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Author Marchant, P.; Hale, J.D.; Sadler, J.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does changing to brighter road lighting improve road safety? Multilevel longitudinal analysis of road traffic collision frequency during the relighting of a UK city Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health Abbreviated Journal J. Epidemiol. Community Health  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Public Safety; traffic safety; Roadway lighting; road safety; road traffic collisions; United Kingdom  
  Abstract (up) Background A step change in the night environment is taking place, with the large-scale installation of bright, broad-spectrum road lighting such as white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). One justification for this is a reduction in road traffic collisions (RTCs). This study aimed to estimate the effect of new lighting on personal injury RTCs within a large UK city.

Methods We analysed a 9-year time series of weekly RTC personal injury counts in 132 areas of the city using multilevel modelling. The RTC rate over a full 24-hour period was the primary outcome; darkness and daylight RTC rates were secondary. The background change in RTC rate was separated from the change associated with the number of newly installed bright lamps by including a polynomial underlying time trend for the logarithm of the mean number of collisions per week for each area. The study was based on a rigorous, predesigned and archived protocol.

Results Within-area coefficients for the broad lighting effect were positive; as the number of bright lamps in an area increased, so did the RTC rate. The estimate for the increase in the within-area 24-hour RTC rate is 11% (95% CI 2% to 20%). The estimate of darkness-only RTCs is 16% (95% CI 2% to 32%). If the effect of lighting on darkness RTC rate is adjusted by that for daylight, one obtains 4% (95% CI −12% to +23%).

Conclusion No evidence was found for bright lamps leading to an improvement in road safety in any of the analyses. For this city, introducing brighter road lighting may have compromised safety rather than reducing harm.
 
  Address Room 221, Leighton Hall, Leeds Beckett University, Headingley Campus, Leeds LS1 3HE, UK; p.marchant(at) leedsbeckett.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher BML Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2835  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stevens, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-at-night, circadian disruption and breast cancer: assessment of existing evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume 38 Issue 4 Pages 963-970  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Blindness/complications/epidemiology; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/metabolism; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/epidemiology/metabolism; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Light Signal Transduction/physiology; Lighting/adverse effects; Melatonin/biosynthesis; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence is increasing globally for largely unknown reasons. The possibility that a portion of the breast cancer burden might be explained by the introduction and increasing use of electricity to light the night was suggested >20 years ago. METHODS: The theory is based on nocturnal light-induced disruption of circadian rhythms, notably reduction of melatonin synthesis. It has formed the basis for a series of predictions including that non-day shift work would increase risk, blind women would be at lower risk, long sleep duration would lower risk and community nighttime light level would co-distribute with breast cancer incidence on the population level. RESULTS: Accumulation of epidemiological evidence has accelerated in recent years, reflected in an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification of shift work as a probable human carcinogen (2A). There is also a strong rodent model in support of the light-at-night (LAN) idea. CONCLUSION: If a consensus eventually emerges that LAN does increase risk, then the mechanisms for the effect are important to elucidate for intervention and mitigation. The basic understanding of phototransduction for the circadian system, and of the molecular genetics of circadian rhythm generation are both advancing rapidly, and will provide for the development of lighting technologies at home and at work that minimize circadian disruption, while maintaining visual efficiency and aesthetics. In the interim, there are strategies now available to reduce the potential for circadian disruption, which include extending the daily dark period, appreciate nocturnal awakening in the dark, using dim red light for nighttime necessities, and unless recommended by a physician, not taking melatonin tablets.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19380369; PMCID:PMC2734067 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 527  
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Author Korompeli, A.; Kavrochorianou, N.; Molcan, L.; Muurlink, O.; Boutzouka, E.; Myrianthefs, P.; Fildissis, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light affects heart rate's 24-h rhythmicity in intensive care unit patients: an observational study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Nursing in Critical Care Abbreviated Journal Nurs Crit Care  
  Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 320-325  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Heart Rate; ICU; Circadian Rhythm  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Intensive care unit (ICU) patients experience two affronts to normal 24-h rhythms: largely internal events such as medication and external factors such as light, noise and nursing interventions. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: We investigated the impact of light variance within an ICU on 24-h rhythmicity of three key physiological parameters: heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and body temperature (BT) in this patient population. DESIGN: Patients were assigned to beds either in the 'light' or 'dark' side within a single ICU. An actigraph continuously recorded light intensity for a 24-72-h period. METHODS: Measurements of HR, MAP and BT were recorded every 30 min. RESULTS: HR, MAP and BT did not follow 24-h rhythmicity in all patients. Higher light exposure in the Light Side of the ICU (122.3 versus 50.6 lx) was related to higher HR (89.4 versus 79.8 bpm), which may translate to clinically relevant outcomes in a larger sample. Duration of stay, the one clinical outcome measured in this study, showed no significant variation between the groups (p = 0.147). CONCLUSIONS: ICU patients are exposed to varying light intensities depending on bed positioning relative to natural sunlight, affecting the 24-h rhythm of HR. Larger, well-controlled studies also investigating the effect of relevant light intensity are indicated. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Light is a variable that can be manipulated in the constrained environment of an ICU, thus offering an avenue for relatively unobtrusive interventions.  
  Address National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, University ICU, Ag. Anargyroi General Hospital, Athens, Greece  
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  ISSN 1362-1017 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:31087602 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2502  
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Author Shang, Y.-M.; Wang, G.-S.; Sliney, D.; Yang, C.-H.; Lee, L.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 122 Issue 3 Pages 269-276  
  Keywords LED; light emitting diode; lighting; retina; Eye Diseases; blue light; Blue-rich light sources  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) deliver higher levels of blue light to the retina than do conventional domestic light sources. Chronic exposure to high-intensity light (2,000-10,000 lux) has previously been found to result in light-induced retinal injury, but chronic exposure to relatively low-intensity (750 lux) light has not been previously assessed with LEDs in a rodent model. OBJECTIVE: We examined LED-induced retinal neuronal cell damage in the Sprague-Dawley rat using functional, histological, and biochemical measurements. METHODS: We used blue LEDs (460 nm) and full-spectrum white LEDs, coupled with matching compact fluorescent lights, for exposures. Pathological examinations included electroretinogram, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also measured free radical production in the retina to determine the oxidative stress level. RESULTS: H&E staining and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors, which indicated blue-light induced photochemical injury of the retina. Free radical production in the retina was increased in LED-exposed groups. IHC staining demonstrated that oxidative stress was associated with retinal injury. Although we found serious retinal light injury in LED groups, the compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) groups showed moderate to mild injury. CONCLUSION: Our results raise questions about adverse effects on the retina from chronic exposure to LED light compared with other light sources that have less blue light. Thus, we suggest a precautionary approach with regard to the use of blue-rich “white” LEDs for general lighting. CITATION: Shang YM, Wang GS, Sliney D, Yang CH, Lee LL. 2014. White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at domestic lighting levels and retinal injury in a rat model. Environ Health Perspect 122:269-276; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307294.  
  Address Institute of Environmental Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:24362357; PMCID:PMC3948037 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 324  
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Author Bauer, S.E.; Wagner, S.E.; Burch, J.; Bayakly, R.; Vena, J.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal Int J Health Geogr  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 23  
  Keywords Human Health; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Georgia/epidemiology; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Registries; Risk Factors  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. METHODS: Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000-2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992-2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0-20 watts per sterradian cm(2)), medium (21-41 watts per sterradian cm(2)), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm(2)). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. RESULTS: Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15-50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. secbauer@ufl.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:23594790; PMCID:PMC3651306 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 718  
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