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Author (down) Srinivasan, V.; Spence, D.W.; Pandi-Perumal, S.R.; Trakht, I.; Esquifino, A.I.; Cardinali, D.P.; Maestroni, G.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin, environmental light, and breast cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Breast Cancer Research and Treatment Abbreviated Journal Breast Cancer Res Treat  
  Volume 108 Issue 3 Pages 339-350  
  Keywords Human Health; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Female; Humans; Light; Lighting/*adverse effects; Melatonin/*physiology; Occupational Exposure/adverse effects  
  Abstract Although many factors have been suggested as causes for breast cancer, the increased incidence of the disease seen in women working in night shifts led to the hypothesis that the suppression of melatonin by light or melatonin deficiency plays a major role in cancer development. Studies on the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea experimental models of human breast cancer indicate that melatonin is effective in reducing cancer development. In vitro studies in MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line have shown that melatonin exerts its anticarcinogenic actions through a variety of mechanisms, and that it is most effective in estrogen receptor (ER) alpha-positive breast cancer cells. Melatonin suppresses ER gene, modulates several estrogen dependent regulatory proteins and pro-oncogenes, inhibits cell proliferation, and impairs the metastatic capacity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The anticarcinogenic action on MCF-7 cells has been demonstrated at the physiological concentrations of melatonin attained at night, suggesting thereby that melatonin acts like an endogenous antiestrogen. Melatonin also decreases the formation of estrogens from androgens via aromatase inhibition. Circulating melatonin levels are abnormally low in ER-positive breast cancer patients thereby supporting the melatonin hypothesis for breast cancer in shift working women. It has been postulated that enhanced endogenous melatonin secretion is responsible for the beneficial effects of meditation as a form of psychosocial intervention that helps breast cancer patients.  
  Address Department of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, Kubang Kerian, Kelantan, Malaysia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0167-6806 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17541739 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 815  
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Author (down) Spoelstra, K.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Donners, M.; Gienapp, P.; Huigens, M.E.; Slaterus, R.; Berendse, F.; Visser, M.E.; Veenendaal, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Experimental illumination of natural habitat—an experimental set-up to assess the direct and indirect ecological consequences of artificial light of different spectral composition Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci  
  Volume 370 Issue Pages 20140129  
  Keywords Lighting; experimental lighting; population dynamics; daily timing; seasonal timing; cascading effects; citizen science; Pipistrellus pipistrellus; bats; pipistrelle bat; wood mouse; birds  
  Abstract Artificial night-time illumination of natural habitats has increased dramatically over the past few decades. Generally, studies that assess the impact of artificial light on various species in the wild make use of existing illumination and are therefore correlative. Moreover, studies mostly focus on short-term consequences at the individual level, rather than long-term consequences at the population and community level—thereby ignoring possible unknown cascading effects in ecosystems. The recent change to LED lighting has opened up the exciting possibility to use light with a custom spectral composition, thereby potentially reducing the negative impact of artificial light. We describe here a large-scale, ecosystem-wide study where we experimentally illuminate forest-edge habitat with different spectral composition, replicated eight times. Monitoring of species is being performed according to rigid protocols, in part using a citizen-science-based approach, and automated where possible. Simultaneously, we specifically look at alterations in behaviour, such as changes in activity, and daily and seasonal timing. In our set-up, we have so far observed that experimental lights facilitate foraging activity of pipistrelle bats, suppress activity of wood mice and have effects on birds at the community level, which vary with spectral composition. Thus far, we have not observed effects on moth populations, but these and many other effects may surface only after a longer period of time.  
  Address 1 Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), PO Box 50, 6700 AB Wageningen, The Netherlands; k.spoelstra@nioo.knaw.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1126  
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Author (down) Spivey, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night and breast cancer risk worldwide Type
  Year 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 118 Issue 12 Pages a525  
  Keywords Human Health; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Female; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Risk Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21123149; PMCID:PMC3002207 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 813  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Sperber, A.N.; Elmore, A.C.; Crow, M.L.; Cawlfield, J.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Performance evaluation of energy efficient lighting associated with renewable energy applications Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Renewable Energy Abbreviated Journal Renewable Energy  
  Volume 44 Issue Pages 423-430  
  Keywords Renewable energy; Energy efficiency; Ultra capacitor; Light emitting diodes; Metal halide; LED; LED lighting  
  Abstract Energy efficiency is a primary consideration when designing off-grid renewable energy systems including portable micro-grids. This study focuses on characterizing the potential benefits associated with using energy efficient exterior area lighting commonly associated with remote installations. Light emitting diode (LED) luminaires are becoming more commercially available, and this study compares two LED products designed for exterior lighting to traditional metal halide lamps. The characterization focuses on the use of a diesel generator, battery bank, and a bank of ultra capacitors (UCAPs) to power the lights because these systems are also used to generate or store energy at renewable energy-powered micro-grids. This field-based study quantifies the illuminance provided by each lighting system, diesel consumption rates associated with powering the lights and/or charging the batteries and UCAPs, and the time of operation for each lighting system when powered by a single discharge cycle of the batteries and UCAPs. The energy efficiency benefit of the LED luminaires is offset by their lower illuminance. However, a comparison of lighting standards for specific purposes such as security lighting indicates that LEDs may be appropriate for applications where a metal halide system would provide significantly more illumination than required at a much higher energy cost. For those purposes where higher levels of illuminance are required, the data presented in the paper may be useful in designing a renewable energy-powered micro-grid that uses multiple LED fixtures to illuminate an exterior area that is currently illuminated by a single metal halide light stand.  
  Address Geological Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 129 McNutt Hall, 1400 N. Bishop Avenue Rolla, MO 65409, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-1481 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 335  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Souman, J.L.; Borra, T.; de Goijer, I.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Vlaskamp, B.N.S.; Lucassen, M.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spectral Tuning of White Light Allows for Strong Reduction in Melatonin Suppression without Changing Illumination Level or Color Temperature Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 420-431  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract Studies with monochromatic light stimuli have shown that the action spectrum for melatonin suppression exhibits its highest sensitivity at short wavelengths, around 460 to 480 nm. Other studies have demonstrated that filtering out the short wavelengths from white light reduces melatonin suppression. However, this filtering of short wavelengths was generally confounded with reduced light intensity and/or changes in color temperature. Moreover, it changed the appearance from white light to yellow/orange, rendering it unusable for many practical applications. Here, we show that selectively tuning a polychromatic white light spectrum, compensating for the reduction in spectral power between 450 and 500 nm by enhancing power at even shorter wavelengths, can produce greatly different effects on melatonin production, without changes in illuminance or color temperature. On different evenings, 15 participants were exposed to 3 h of white light with either low or high power between 450 and 500 nm, and the effects on salivary melatonin levels and alertness were compared with those during a dim light baseline. Exposure to the spectrum with low power between 450 and 500 nm, but high power at even shorter wavelengths, did not suppress melatonin compared with dim light, despite a large difference in illuminance (175 vs. <5 lux). In contrast, exposure to the spectrum with high power between 450 and 500 nm (also 175 lux) resulted in almost 50% melatonin suppression. For alertness, no significant differences between the 3 conditions were observed. These results open up new opportunities for lighting applications that allow for the use of electrical lighting without disturbance of melatonin production.  
  Address Philips Lighting Research, Department Lighting Applications, Eindhoven, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29984614 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1985  
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