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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.
Title Human Factors Impacts of Light-Emitting Diode Airfield Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Volume 2626 Issue Pages 51-57
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) differ from incandescent light sources in several ways that are relevant to energy and maintenance requirements of airfield lighting systems. They have higher luminous efficacy and, when designed properly, have longer useful operating lives; both factors make LEDs attractive candidates for airfield lighting. The photometric, colorimetric, and temporal characteristics of LEDs also differ from those of incandescent light sources, and these can have important implications for the appearance of runway and taxiway lighting systems. The present paper reviews publications summarizing experimental and analytical investigations designed to assess these implications with respect to the following human factors impacts: color identification, brightness and glare, visibility in fog and haze, response to onset of flashing lights, and stroboscopic effects such as the phantom array. Overall, this review of experimental evidence suggests that, in addition to their reduced energy use and maintenance requirements, LED airfield lighting can be advantageous in comparison with incandescent lighting systems used to delineate airport runways and taxiways.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1758
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.
Title Spectral sensitivity for extrafoveal discomfort glare Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Journal of Modern Optics Abbreviated Journal Journal of Modern Optics
Volume 56 Issue 13 Pages 1518-1522
Keywords Vision; Lighting
Abstract Previously published evidence suggests that the discomfort glare response to bright lights has greater short-wavelength spectral sensitivity than implied by the photopic luminous efficiency function, V(λ). The present paper summarizes a series of experiments to characterize spectral sensitivity for discomfort glare from nearly monochromatic light sources presented in the near extrafovea (5° and 10° off-axis). The results are consistent with increased participation in the discomfort glare response from short-wavelength cones and greater short-wavelength sensitivity as eccentricity increases. From the results an empirical family of luminous efficiency functions, V DG(λ), for discomfort glare, is derived. Such data could have implications for specifications of roadway lighting, vehicle headlamps or other light sources that might contribute to discomfort glare.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-0340 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1759
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.; Donnell, E.T.; Rea, M.S.
Title To illuminate or not to illuminate: roadway lighting as it affects traffic safety at intersections Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Accident; Analysis and Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accid Anal Prev
Volume 53 Issue Pages 65-77
Keywords Lighting; Accident Prevention/*methods; Accidents, Traffic/*prevention & control/psychology/statistics & numerical data; Cross-Sectional Studies; *Environment Design; Humans; *Lighting; Minnesota; Models, Statistical; Photoperiod; Psychomotor Performance; Regression Analysis; Safety/statistics & numerical data; Visual Perception
Abstract A two-pronged effort to quantify the impact of lighting on traffic safety is presented. In the statistical approach, the effects of lighting on crash frequency for different intersection types in Minnesota were assessed using count regression models. The models included many geometric and traffic control variables to estimate the association between lighting and nighttime and daytime crashes and the resulting night-to-day crash ratios. Overall, the presence of roadway intersection lighting was found to be associated with an approximately 12% lower night-to-day crash ratio than unlighted intersections. In the parallel analytical approach, visual performance analyses based on roadway intersection lighting practices in Minnesota were made for the same intersection types investigated in the statistical approach. The results of both approaches were convergent, suggesting that visual performance improvements from roadway lighting could serve as input for predicting improvements in crash frequency. A provisional transfer function allows transportation engineers to evaluate alternative lighting systems in the design phase so selections based on expected benefits and costs can be made.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23377085 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 627
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.; Skinner, N.P.
Title Real-World Demonstrations of Novel Pedestrian Crosswalk Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Volume 2661 Issue Pages 62-68
Keywords Lighting; Public Safety; Planning
Abstract Outdoor urban pedestrian lighting serves multiple purposes and should do so in the most efficient and economic manner. An important purpose of outdoor urban pedestrian lighting is to support the safety of pedestrians, particularly those who interact with adjacent vehicle traffic, while enhancing pedestrians’ perceptions of personal safety and security. A review of published literature, as well as the demonstration activities summarized, indicates the potential for bollard-level crosswalk lighting to enhance pedestrian visibility and to improve safety at crosswalks, particularly at locations where the presence of a crosswalk might not be expected by approaching drivers. Such locations include midblock crossings, roundabouts, and locations near schools and other public venues that might experience high levels of pedestrian traffic at sporadic or unexpected times.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1723
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.; Skinner, N.P.; Plummer, T.T.
Title Assessment of an Adaptive Driving Beam Headlighting System: Visibility and Glare Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Volume 2555 Issue Pages 81-85
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Recent developments in solid-state lighting, sensor, and control technologies make new configurations for vehicle forward lighting feasible. Adaptive driving beam (ADB) systems build on systems that automatically switch from high- to low-beam headlights in the presence of oncoming vehicles. ADB systems can detect oncoming headlights and preceding taillights and reduce their intensity only in the direction of the other lights, while they maintain higher levels of illumination throughout the remainder of the field of view. The nominal benefit of ADB systems is the provision of high-beam levels of illumination in the forward scene, while glare is reduced to oncoming and preceding drivers, who perceive low-beam illumination levels. In this study, two dynamic field experiments were conducted: one experiment measured the ability of observers to identify the walking direction of roadside pedestrian targets with and without the use of the ADB system; the other experiment evaluated the discomfort glare elicited by the ADB system compared with the glare from conventional low- and high-beam headlights. The findings from both experiments were consistent with previous analytical and static field tests and suggested that ADB systems can offer safety benefits beyond those offered by conventional headlight systems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1618
Permanent link to this record