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Author (up) Du, J.; Zhang, X.; King, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An investigation into the risk of night light pollution in a glazed office building: The effect of shading solutions Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment  
  Volume 145 Issue Pages 243-259  
  Keywords Lighting; Planning  
  Abstract Light pollution has been recognised as a major environmental problem in urban areas at night. This study presents an investigation into the impact of seven various shading solutions on the risk of light pollution caused by indoor artificial lighting in a fully glazed office building. Radiance, a ray-tracing package, was adopted to calculate external illuminances produced by indoor lighting applications at various positions. It has been determined that: 1) A glazed façade could become a critical source of light pollution or obtrusive light (sky glow and light trespass) due to applications of indoor lighting at night; 2) A light shelf could perform well on the protection of both light trespass and sky glow; 3) A large overhang and horizontal louvre could effectively lower the risk of light trespass, but would possibly cause the deterioration of sky glow; and 4) No significant impact of short overhang and vertical louvre can be found on the two aspects of light pollution. This study exposes a significant implication; apart from their principal functions, the shading devices applied in a largely glazed building may require a new role in controlling obtrusive light in cities at night.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2015  
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Author (up) E. Olvera-Gonzalez; D. Alaniz-Lumbreras; V. Torres-Argüelles; E. González-Ramírez; J. Villa-Hernández; M. Araiza-Esquivel; R. Ivanov-Tsonchev; C. Olvera-Olvera; V.M. Castaño url  openurl
  Title A LED-based smart illumination system for studying plant growth Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Lighting  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 644  
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Author (up) Ebbensgaard, C.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Making sense of diodes and sodium: Vision, visuality and the everyday experience of infrastructural change Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Geoforum Abbreviated Journal Geoforum  
  Volume 103 Issue Pages 95-104  
  Keywords Lighting; visual sensorium; United Kingdom  
  Abstract The recognition of vision as a powerful register for organising urban space locates lighting technologies at the heart of urban experience. Recently, scholars have established that lighting technologies shape not just what we see but how we see, drawing attention towards light as that ‘with which we see’. This article shifts attention from the role of lighting in shaping what and how people see, to how people make sense of changes to their visual sensorium—from what lighting infrastructures do to what is done with them. By following older residents living in the London Borough of Newham along routine travels on foot at night, I demonstrate how they make sense of the Council’s initiative to upgrade their 19,500 street-lamps with Light Emitting Diodes. I demonstrate how such infrastructural change exposes an uneven geographical distribution of and access to light and darkness with potentially detrimental consequences for the formation of public life after dark. Recognising how light infrastructures are reframed through everyday life, I demonstrate how LEDs do not necessarily produce their desired effects and how light clutter and light bleed might contribute to producing nocturnal atmospheres where people feel safe and confident. Broadening the understanding of how different technologies and light sources are important for the formation of inclusive nocturnal publics the article sets out a ‘politics of visibility’ that recognises the role of lighting in creating visibility for and of residents.  
  Address Queen Mary University of London, 329 Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom; c.l.ebbensgaard(at)qmul.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0016-7185 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2360  
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Author (up) Ebbensgaard, C.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Standardised difference: Challenging uniform lighting through standards and regulation Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Urban Studies Abbreviated Journal Urban Studies  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 0042098019866568  
  Keywords Regulation; Lighting; Conservation; Darkness; Planning; Society  
  Abstract Artificial lighting has received increased attention from urban scholars and geographers in recent years. It is celebrated for its experimental aesthetics and experiential qualities and critiqued for its adverse effects on biological life and the environment. Yet scholars and practitioners unite in their disapproval of uniform and homogenous lighting that follows from standardised lighting technologies and design principles. Absent from debates in urban scholarship and geography, however, is any serious consideration of how lighting designers respond to such standardised measures and regulations. In this article, I address this lack of academic attention by exploring how designers overturn the restrictive challenges posed by the standards and regulations of the design and planning process. Drawing on interviews with designers involved in the lighting design of a mixed-use redevelopment project in Canning Town, East London, I demonstrate how the interpretation and translation of lighting standards and regulations resist the tendency to predetermine design aesthetics and functions. By drawing attention away from the technical specifications and numerical values that are prescribed in standards and regulations, and towards lighting’s experiential and performative effects, the article argues that lighting designers can play an important role in challenging how standards and regulations are measured, defined and maintained. Calling on urban scholars to play a more prominent role in foregrounding this process of translation, I suggest that standards and regulations can provide frameworks within which luminous differentiation and preservation of darkness can be achieved, playing a potentially crucial role in ensuring a socially and environmentally sustainable transition to energy efficient lighting.  
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  ISSN 0042-0980 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2678  
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Author (up) Edison, T.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Success of the Electric Light Type Magazine Article
  Year 1880 Publication The North American Review Abbreviated Journal N. American Rev.  
  Volume 131 Issue 287 Pages 295-300  
  Keywords Society; history; artificial light; Lighting  
  Abstract (none)  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher University of Northern Iowa Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1272  
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