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Author (up) Boyce, P.R.
Title The benefits of light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment
Volume 151 Issue Pages 356-367
Keywords Lighting; Society; Conservation
Abstract The use of light at night continues to increase. Simply put, this is because without light we are deprived of our premier sense, vision. By enabling vision the use of light at night delivers a number of benefits to people. Such benefits include greater safety for pedestrians and drivers, reduced fear of crime, more use of outdoor facilities after dark, enhanced economic growth and the creation of built and natural environments that are a source of beauty and entertainment. This suggests that the use of light at night is linked to some very basic human motivations which in turn means that people value such benefits and will not willingly abandon them. Fortunately, careful lighting design, soundly-based outdoor lighting standards and new lighting and sensor technology offer the possibility of providing the benefits of light at night while minimizing the impact on the environment.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2171
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Author (up) Brainard, G.C.; Coyle, W.; Ayers, M.; Kemp, J.; Warfield, B.; Maida, J.; Bowen, C.; Bernecker, C.; Lockley, S.W.; Hanifin, J.P.
Title Solid-state lighting for the International Space Station: Tests of visual performance and melatonin regulation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Acta Astronautica Abbreviated Journal Acta Astronautica
Volume 92 Issue 1 Pages 21-28
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract The International Space Station (ISS) uses General Luminaire Assemblies (GLAs) that house fluorescent lamps for illuminating the astronauts' working and living environments. Solid-state light emitting diodes (LEDs) are attractive candidates for replacing the GLAs on the ISS. The advantages of LEDs over conventional fluorescent light sources include lower up-mass, power consumption and heat generation, as well as fewer toxic materials, greater resistance to damage and long lamp life. A prototype Solid-State Lighting Assembly (SSLA) was developed and successfully installed on the ISS. The broad aim of the ongoing work is to test light emitted by prototype SSLAs for supporting astronaut vision and assessing neuroendocrine, circadian, neurobehavioral and sleep effects. Three completed ground-based studies are presented here including experiments on visual performance, color discrimination, and acute plasma melatonin suppression in cohorts of healthy, human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions within a high-fidelity replica of the ISS Crew Quarters (CQ). All visual tests were done under indirect daylight at 201 lx, fluorescent room light at 531 lx and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ at 1266 lx. Visual performance was assessed with numerical verification tests (NVT). NVT data show that there are no significant differences in score (F=0.73, p=0.48) or time (F=0.14, p=0.87) for subjects performing five contrast tests (10%–100%). Color discrimination was assessed with Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue tests (FM-100). The FM-100 data showed no significant differences (F=0.01, p=0.99) in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light and 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ. Plasma melatonin suppression data show that there are significant differences (F=29.61, p<0.0001) across the percent change scores of plasma melatonin for five corneal irradiances, ranging from 0 to 405 &#956;W/cm2 of 4870 K SSLA light in the CQ (0–1270 lx). Risk factors for the health and safety of astronauts include disturbed circadian rhythms and altered sleep–wake patterns. These studies will help determine if SSLA lighting can be used both to support astronaut vision and serve as an in-flight countermeasure for circadian desynchrony, sleep disruption and cognitive performance deficits on the ISS.
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ISSN 0094-5765 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1533
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Author (up) Brons JA; Bullogh JD; Rea MS
Title Outdoor site-lighting performance: A comprehensive and quantitative framework for assessing light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 40 Issue Pages 201-204
Keywords lighting technology, lighting design
Abstract Outdoor Site-Lighting Performance (OSP) is a comprehensive method for predicting and measuring three different aspects of light pollution: glow, trespass and glare. OSP is based upon the philosophy that a rational framework is necessary for optimising private and public desires for and against night-time lighting. Results are presented from over one hundred outdoor lighting installations that provide an empirical foundation for acknowledging the benefits of night-time lighting while establishing limits on light pollution. Recommended limits for glow, trespass and glare are offered to stimulate discussion among all stakeholders concerned with night-time lighting.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1426
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Author (up) Bryant, J.M.; Hake, H.G.
Title A decision support system for assessment of street lighting tenders based on energy performance indicators and environmental criteria: Overview, methodology and case study Type Journal Article
Year 1911 Publication University of Illinois Bulletin Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue 8 Pages Bulletin No. 51
Keywords Lighting; Energy; Economics; Planning
Abstract It is the purpose of this bulletin to make available information concerning street illumination. The suggestion which led to this compilation came from the many inquiries received by the Electrical Engineering Department each year from those interested in framing ordinances permitting corporations or individuals to operate street lighting systems. An attempt has been made to present this information in such a form as to be readily understood by the general public, without requiring any special technical knowledge. The data have been compiled from reliable sources, and checked in many instances by tests conducted by the writers.
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Publisher University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, College of Engineering Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2739
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.
Title Spectral Sensitivity Modeling and Nighttime Scene Brightness Perception Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Leukos Abbreviated Journal Leukos
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 11-17
Keywords Vision; human vision; Melanopsin; Outdoor Lighting; Scene brightness; Spectral sensitivity; visual psychophysics
Abstract Brightness perception under different light sources is an important visual response, because it is related to perceptions of safety. A growing number of studies have been conducted to assess perceptions of scene brightness under light sources differing in spectral content, including results consistent with a role of melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in scene brightness. Data from recent studies of scene brightness perception at light levels experienced under nighttime driving conditions are used to compare different models of brightness perception. The data support a role of increased short-wavelength sensitivity for scene brightness perception and a provisional spectral sensitivity model that takes into account the possible influence of melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells is suggested as a basis for further investigation. The implications of such a model on brightness perception under several light sources used in transportation lighting are described.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1550-2724 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1073
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