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Author (up) Bryant, J.M.; Hake, H.G.
Title A decision support system for assessment of street lighting tenders based on energy performance indicators and environmental criteria: Overview, methodology and case study Type Journal Article
Year 1911 Publication University of Illinois Bulletin Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue 8 Pages Bulletin No. 51
Keywords Lighting; Energy; Economics; Planning
Abstract It is the purpose of this bulletin to make available information concerning street illumination. The suggestion which led to this compilation came from the many inquiries received by the Electrical Engineering Department each year from those interested in framing ordinances permitting corporations or individuals to operate street lighting systems. An attempt has been made to present this information in such a form as to be readily understood by the general public, without requiring any special technical knowledge. The data have been compiled from reliable sources, and checked in many instances by tests conducted by the writers.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, College of Engineering Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2739
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.
Title Spectral Sensitivity Modeling and Nighttime Scene Brightness Perception Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Leukos Abbreviated Journal Leukos
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 11-17
Keywords Vision; human vision; Melanopsin; Outdoor Lighting; Scene brightness; Spectral sensitivity; visual psychophysics
Abstract Brightness perception under different light sources is an important visual response, because it is related to perceptions of safety. A growing number of studies have been conducted to assess perceptions of scene brightness under light sources differing in spectral content, including results consistent with a role of melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in scene brightness. Data from recent studies of scene brightness perception at light levels experienced under nighttime driving conditions are used to compare different models of brightness perception. The data support a role of increased short-wavelength sensitivity for scene brightness perception and a provisional spectral sensitivity model that takes into account the possible influence of melanopsin-containing, intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells is suggested as a basis for further investigation. The implications of such a model on brightness perception under several light sources used in transportation lighting are described.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1550-2724 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1073
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.
Title Human Factors Impacts of Light-Emitting Diode Airfield Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Volume 2626 Issue Pages 51-57
Keywords Lighting
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) differ from incandescent light sources in several ways that are relevant to energy and maintenance requirements of airfield lighting systems. They have higher luminous efficacy and, when designed properly, have longer useful operating lives; both factors make LEDs attractive candidates for airfield lighting. The photometric, colorimetric, and temporal characteristics of LEDs also differ from those of incandescent light sources, and these can have important implications for the appearance of runway and taxiway lighting systems. The present paper reviews publications summarizing experimental and analytical investigations designed to assess these implications with respect to the following human factors impacts: color identification, brightness and glare, visibility in fog and haze, response to onset of flashing lights, and stroboscopic effects such as the phantom array. Overall, this review of experimental evidence suggests that, in addition to their reduced energy use and maintenance requirements, LED airfield lighting can be advantageous in comparison with incandescent lighting systems used to delineate airport runways and taxiways.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1758
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.
Title Spectral sensitivity for extrafoveal discomfort glare Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Journal of Modern Optics Abbreviated Journal Journal of Modern Optics
Volume 56 Issue 13 Pages 1518-1522
Keywords Vision; Lighting
Abstract Previously published evidence suggests that the discomfort glare response to bright lights has greater short-wavelength spectral sensitivity than implied by the photopic luminous efficiency function, V(λ). The present paper summarizes a series of experiments to characterize spectral sensitivity for discomfort glare from nearly monochromatic light sources presented in the near extrafovea (5° and 10° off-axis). The results are consistent with increased participation in the discomfort glare response from short-wavelength cones and greater short-wavelength sensitivity as eccentricity increases. From the results an empirical family of luminous efficiency functions, V DG(λ), for discomfort glare, is derived. Such data could have implications for specifications of roadway lighting, vehicle headlamps or other light sources that might contribute to discomfort glare.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0950-0340 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1759
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Author (up) Bullough, J.D.; Donnell, E.T.; Rea, M.S.
Title To illuminate or not to illuminate: roadway lighting as it affects traffic safety at intersections Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Accident; Analysis and Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accid Anal Prev
Volume 53 Issue Pages 65-77
Keywords Lighting; Accident Prevention/*methods; Accidents, Traffic/*prevention & control/psychology/statistics & numerical data; Cross-Sectional Studies; *Environment Design; Humans; *Lighting; Minnesota; Models, Statistical; Photoperiod; Psychomotor Performance; Regression Analysis; Safety/statistics & numerical data; Visual Perception
Abstract A two-pronged effort to quantify the impact of lighting on traffic safety is presented. In the statistical approach, the effects of lighting on crash frequency for different intersection types in Minnesota were assessed using count regression models. The models included many geometric and traffic control variables to estimate the association between lighting and nighttime and daytime crashes and the resulting night-to-day crash ratios. Overall, the presence of roadway intersection lighting was found to be associated with an approximately 12% lower night-to-day crash ratio than unlighted intersections. In the parallel analytical approach, visual performance analyses based on roadway intersection lighting practices in Minnesota were made for the same intersection types investigated in the statistical approach. The results of both approaches were convergent, suggesting that visual performance improvements from roadway lighting could serve as input for predicting improvements in crash frequency. A provisional transfer function allows transportation engineers to evaluate alternative lighting systems in the design phase so selections based on expected benefits and costs can be made.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23377085 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 627
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