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Author Hyari, K.H.; Khelifi, A.; Katkhuda, H.
Title Multiobjective Optimization of Roadway Lighting Projects Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Transportation Engineering Abbreviated Journal J. Transp. Eng.
Volume Issue Pages (down) 04016024
Keywords Lighting; multiobjective optimization; traffic safety; road safety; lighting design; uniformity; genetic algorithm
Abstract Roadway lighting systems play a major role in maintaining nighttime traffic safety as they reduce both the number and severity of nighttime traffic accidents. While the design of roadway lighting systems involves multiple objectives, past studies have focused on optimizing only one of the multiple objectives that should be considered. This paper presents a multiobjective optimization model for roadway lighting projects that simultaneously optimizes four design objectives. The incorporated objectives are (1) maximizing the average lighting level on the road surface; (2) maximizing the lighting uniformity along the roadway; (3) minimizing the glare to road users produced by the lighting system; and (4) minimizing the cost of operating the lighting system. The model is designed and developed as a multiobjective genetic algorithm to help decision-makers in their endeavor to provide efficient roadway lighting systems that strike a balance between the four conflicting objectives. The present model considers the following six design variables: type of lighting fixture, mounting height, spacing, fixture offset, fixture’s inclination, and fixture’s rotation angle. An application example is analyzed in this paper to clarify the use of the model and display its significant features in producing better lighting arrangements for roadways.
Address Dept. of Civil Engineering, Hashemite Univ., P.O. Box 150459, Zarqa 13115, Jordan; hyari(at)hu.edu.jo
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher ASCE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0733-947X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1405
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Author Kim, K.-M.; Kim, Y.-W.; Oh, S.-T.; Lim, J.-H.
Title Development of a natural light reproduction system for maintaining the circadian rhythm Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Indoor and Built Environment Abbreviated Journal Indoor and Built Environment
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 1420326X19855421
Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; indoor light
Abstract Circadian rhythm is linked to sleep, arousal and human health overall, affecting body temperature and heart rate. A 24-h natural-light cycle provides optimum lighting environment for humans. However, as people increasingly stay indoors with artificial lighting, lacking periodic characteristics, imbalance in the circadian rhythm ensues. Previous lighting-related studies to resolve such problem partially provided the colour temperatures of natural light but failed to reproduce the 24-h periodic characteristics of it. This study proposes a natural light-reproducing system that provides the daylight cycle characteristics of natural light in order to maintain the circadian rhythm. Natural light was measured through an optical measurement equipment, while the characteristics (colour temperature and short-wavelength ratio) of natural light by season and time were analysed. Subsequently, the control indicator of seasonal and hourly lighting was extracted and applied to the light-emitting diode lighting to provide lighting service, executing a daylight cycle that reflects the characteristics of natural light. After the sunset, especially, the circadian rhythm was maintained by minimizing the short-wavelength ratio of the lighting while maintaining indoor illumination.
Address Department of Computer Science & Engineering, Kongju National University, Cheonan-si, South Korea
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Sage Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1420-326X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2591
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Author Rowse, E.G.; Harris, S.; Jones, G.
Title Effects of dimming light-emitting diode street lights on light-opportunistic and light-averse bats in suburban habitats Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.
Volume 5 Issue 6 Pages (down) 180205
Keywords Animals; Lighting
Abstract Emerging lighting technologies provide opportunities for reducing carbon footprints, and for biodiversity conservation. In addition to installing light-emitting diode street lights, many local authorities are also dimming street lights. This might benefit light-averse bat species by creating dark refuges for these bats to forage and commute in human-dominated habitats. We conducted a field experiment to determine how light intensity affects the activity of the light-opportunistic Pipistrellus pipistrellus and light-averse bats in the genus Myotis. We used four lighting levels controlled under a central management system at existing street lights in a suburban environment (0, 25, 50 and 100% of the original output). Higher light intensities (50 and 100% of original output) increased the activity of light-opportunistic species but reduced the activity of light-averse bats. Compared to the unlit treatment, the 25% lighting level did not significantly affect either P. pipistrellus or Myotis spp. Our results suggest that it is possible to achieve a light intensity that provides both economic and ecological benefits by providing sufficient light for human requirements while not deterring light-averse bats.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1931
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Author Egri, Á.; Száz, D.; Farkas, A.; Pereszlényi, Á; Horváth, G.; Kriska, G.
Title Method to improve the survival of night-swarming mayflies near bridges in areas of distracting light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.
Volume 4 Issue 11 Pages (down) 171166
Keywords Animals; Lighting
Abstract Numerous negative ecological effects of urban lighting have been identified during the last decades. In spite of the development of lighting technologies, the detrimental effect of this form of light pollution has not declined. Several insect species are affected including the night-swarming mayfly Ephoron virgo: when encountering bridges during their mass swarming, these mayflies often fall victim to artificial lighting. We show a simple method for the conservation of these mayflies exploiting their positive phototaxis. With downstream-facing light-emitting diode beacon lights above two tributaries of the river Danube, we managed to guide egg-laying females to the water and prevent them from perishing outside the river near urban lights. By means of measuring the mayfly outflow from the river as a function of time and the on/off state of the beacons, we showed that the number of mayflies exiting the river's area was practically zero when our beacons were operating. Tributaries could be the sources of mayfly recolonization in case of water quality degradation of large rivers. The protection of mayfly populations in small rivers and safeguarding their aggregation and oviposition sites is therefore important.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1786
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Author Rowse, E.G.; Harris, S.; Jones, G.
Title The Switch from Low-Pressure Sodium to Light Emitting Diodes Does Not Affect Bat Activity at Street Lights Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages (down) e0150884
Keywords Animals; bats; England; United Kingdom; low-pressure sodium; LPS; LED; LED lighting; ecology; urban ecology; Feeding Behavior
Abstract We used a before-after-control-impact paired design to examine the effects of a switch from low-pressure sodium (LPS) to light emitting diode (LED) street lights on bat activity at twelve sites across southern England. LED lights produce broad spectrum 'white' light compared to LPS street lights that emit narrow spectrum, orange light. These spectral differences could influence the abundance of insects at street lights and thereby the activity of the bats that prey on them. Most of the bats flying around the LPS lights were aerial-hawking species, and the species composition of bats remained the same after the switch-over to LED. We found that the switch-over from LPS to LED street lights did not affect the activity (number of bat passes), or the proportion of passes containing feeding buzzes, of those bat species typically found in close proximity to street lights in suburban environments in Britain. This is encouraging from a conservation perspective as many existing street lights are being, or have been, switched to LED before the ecological consequences have been assessed. However, lighting of all spectra studied to date generally has a negative impact on several slow-flying bat species, and LED lights are rarely frequented by these 'light-intolerant' bat species.
Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, United Kingdom; liz.rowse(at)bristol.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher PLOS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27008274 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1403
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