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Author Fotios, S.; Yao, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The association between correlated colour temperature and scotopic/photopic ratio Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 35 Issue 10 Pages (down) 1365-1374  
  Keywords Vision; Lighting  
  Abstract The scotopic/photopic ratio (S/P) is a parameter that may be considered in the design of road lighting. This paper compares the S/P ratio and correlated colour temperature (CCT) for 297 light source spectra identified in IES Technical Memorandum TM-30-15 to test the assumption that higher S/P ratios demand higher CCTs. The results suggest that, for a given lamp type, there is a strong association between S/P ratio and CCT, and hence that for a given CCT only a small variation in S/P ratio is available. However, the results also suggest that a larger variation in S/P ratio is possible if the lighting designer is able to consider a change in lamp type.  
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  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1954  
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Author Stevens, R.G.; Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.; Hansen, J.; Lockley, S.W.; Provencio, I.; Rea, M.S.; Reinlib, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meeting report: the role of environmental lighting and circadian disruption in cancer and other diseases Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 115 Issue 9 Pages (down) 1357-1362  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; Environmental Exposure; Humans; *Lighting/adverse effects; *Neoplasms/etiology; Research; breast cancer; circadian rhythms; clock genes; lighting; melatonin; phototransduction; pineal gland  
  Abstract Light, including artificial light, has a range of effects on human physiology and behavior and can therefore alter human physiology when inappropriately timed. One example of potential light-induced disruption is the effect of light on circadian organization, including the production of several hormone rhythms. Changes in light-dark exposure (e.g., by nonday occupation or transmeridian travel) shift the timing of the circadian system such that internal rhythms can become desynchronized from both the external environment and internally with each other, impairing our ability to sleep and wake at the appropriate times and compromising physiologic and metabolic processes. Light can also have direct acute effects on neuroendocrine systems, for example, in suppressing melatonin synthesis or elevating cortisol production that may have untoward long-term consequences. For these reasons, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences convened a workshop of a diverse group of scientists to consider how best to conduct research on possible connections between lighting and health. According to the participants in the workshop, there are three broad areas of research effort that need to be addressed. First are the basic biophysical and molecular genetic mechanisms for phototransduction for circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation. Second are the possible physiologic consequences of disrupting these circadian regulatory processes such as on hormone production, particularly melatonin, and normal and neoplastic tissue growth dynamics. Third are effects of light-induced physiologic disruption on disease occurrence and prognosis, and how prevention and treatment could be improved by application of this knowledge.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17805428; PMCID:PMC1964886 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 821  
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Author Pracki, P.; Skarżyński, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Multi-Criteria Assessment Procedure for Outdoor Lighting at the Design Stage Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages (down) 1330  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract This paper presents an attempt at a unified approach for the assessment of outdoor lighting solutions at the design stage. First of all, the lighting criteria for different types of outdoor lighting installations have been carefully described. Despite the differences in criteria, it is possible to find a common ground for the assessment of lighting solutions at the design stage. This is based on the need for the assessment of lighting solutions to be included in the requirements for the luminous environment, light pollution, and energy efficiency. The review and analysis of the standards and reports allows an experimental procedure to be created, the main aim of which is to find the best and most sustainable lighting solution for any outdoor situation. The procedure was tested by the example of an analysis of parking lot lighting solutions. In the case analyzed, 120 solutions were considered. It appeared that, in only 65 cases were the requirements referring to both lighting condition and light pollution met. Finally, based on the lighting energy efficiency assessment, ten solutions were selected as the most suitable. Furthermore, only one solution out of the ten was the most beneficial, taking into account the extra criterion of basic economic cost. The case study confirms that the assessment procedure allows the most beneficial solution to be selected, taking into account the luminous environment, as well as light pollution and energy efficiency criteria. The proposed multi-criteria assessment procedure may be used as a valuable tool by lighting designers to select the most beneficial solution in order to meet the needs of safety, visual efficiency, and comfort, as well as taking into account light pollution and energy efficiency restrictions.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2869  
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Author Wyse, C.A.; Selman, C.; Page, M.M.; Coogan, A.N.; Hazlerigg, D.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian desynchrony and metabolic dysfunction; did light pollution make us fat? Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Med Hypotheses  
  Volume 77 Issue 6 Pages (down) 1139-1144  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/etiology; History, 20th Century; History, 21st Century; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects/history/statistics & numerical data; Metabolic Diseases/*complications/etiology; Mice; *Models, Biological; Obesity/*epidemiology/*etiology; *Photoperiod; Rats  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations in physiology and behaviour that recur with a period of 24h, and that are entrained by the daily photoperiod. The cycle of sunrise and sunset provided a reliable time cue for many thousands of years, until the advent of artificial lighting disrupted the entrainment of human circadian rhythms to the solar photoperiod. Circadian desynchrony (CD) occurs when endogenous rhythms become misaligned with daily photoperiodic cycles, and this condition is facilitated by artificial lighting. This review examines the hypothesis that chronic CD that has accompanied the availability of electric lighting in the developed world induces a metabolic and behavioural phenotype that is predisposed to the development of obesity. The evidence to support this hypothesis is based on epidemiological data showing coincidence between the appearance of obesity and the availability of artificial light, both geographically, and historically. This association links CD to obesity in humans, and is corroborated by experimental studies that demonstrate that CD can induce obesity and metabolic dysfunction in humans and in rodents. This association between CD and obesity has far reaching implications for human health, lifestyle and work practices. Attention to the rhythmicity of daily sleep, exercise, work and feeding schedules could be beneficial in targeting or reversing the modern human predisposition to obesity.  
  Address Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3TZ, UK. c.wyse@abdn.ac.uk  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21983352 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 837  
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Author Meng, Y.; He, Z.; Yin, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Quantitative calculation of human melatonin suppression induced by inappropriate light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing Abbreviated Journal Med Biol Eng Comput  
  Volume 49 Issue 9 Pages (down) 1083-1088  
  Keywords Algorithms; Circadian Rhythm/physiology/*radiation effects; Humans; *Lighting; Melatonin/*secretion; *Models, Biological; Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells/physiology/radiation effects; Retinal Ganglion Cells/physiology/radiation effects; Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells/physiology/radiation effects  
  Abstract Melatonin (C(1)(3)H(1)(6)N(2)O(2)) has a wide range of functions in the body. When is inappropriately exposed to light at night, human circadian rhythm will be interfered and then melatonin secretion will become abnormal. For nearly three decades great progresses have been achieved in analytic action spectra and melatonin suppression by various light conditions. However, so far few articles focused on the quantitative calculation of melatonin suppression induced by light. In this article, an algorithm is established, in which all the contributions of rods, cones, and intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are considered. Calculation results accords with the experimental data in references very well, which indicate the validity of this algorithm. This algorithm can also interpret the rule of melatonin suppression varying with light correlated color temperature very well.  
  Address Photonics Research Center, School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0140-0118 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21717231 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 236  
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