toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Falchi, F.; Cinzano, P.; Elvidge, C.D.; Keith, D.M.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Limiting the impact of light pollution on human health, environment and stellar visibility Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage  
  Volume 92 Issue 10 Pages 2714-2722  
  Keywords Animals; Animals, Wild; Conservation of Natural Resources; Environment; *Environmental Pollution; Eye; *Health; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects/standards; Melatonin/*antagonists & inhibitors; Sodium; Vision, Ocular/*physiology; Visual Perception  
  Abstract Light pollution is one of the most rapidly increasing types of environmental degradation. Its levels have been growing exponentially over the natural nocturnal lighting levels provided by starlight and moonlight. To limit this pollution several effective practices have been defined: the use of shielding on lighting fixture to prevent direct upward light, particularly at low angles above the horizon; no over lighting, i.e. avoid using higher lighting levels than strictly needed for the task, constraining illumination to the area where it is needed and the time it will be used. Nevertheless, even after the best control of the light distribution is reached and when the proper quantity of light is used, some upward light emission remains, due to reflections from the lit surfaces and atmospheric scatter. The environmental impact of this “residual light pollution”, cannot be neglected and should be limited too. Here we propose a new way to limit the effects of this residual light pollution on wildlife, human health and stellar visibility. We performed analysis of the spectra of common types of lamps for external use, including the new LEDs. We evaluated their emissions relative to the spectral response functions of human eye photoreceptors, in the photopic, scotopic and the 'meltopic' melatonin suppressing bands. We found that the amount of pollution is strongly dependent on the spectral characteristics of the lamps, with the more environmentally friendly lamps being low pressure sodium, followed by high pressure sodium. Most polluting are the lamps with a strong blue emission, like Metal Halide and white LEDs. Migration from the now widely used sodium lamps to white lamps (MH and LEDs) would produce an increase of pollution in the scotopic and melatonin suppression bands of more than five times the present levels, supposing the same photopic installed flux. This increase will exacerbate known and possible unknown effects of light pollution on human health, environment and on visual perception of the Universe by humans. We present quantitative criteria to evaluate the lamps based on their spectral emissions and we suggest regulatory limits for future lighting.  
  Address Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dell'Inquinamento Luminoso, Via Roma 13, I-36106 Thiene, Italy. falchi@lightpollution.it  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21745709 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 131  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gooley, J.J.; Chamberlain, K.; Smith, K.A.; Khalsa, S.B.S.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Van Reen, E.; Zeitzer, J.M.; Czeisler, C.A.; Lockley, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to room light before bedtime suppresses melatonin onset and shortens melatonin duration in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages E463-72  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Female; Humans; *Light; *Lighting; Male; Melatonin/*blood; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; Young Adult  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Millions of individuals habitually expose themselves to room light in the hours before bedtime, yet the effects of this behavior on melatonin signaling are not well recognized. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that exposure to room light in the late evening suppresses the onset of melatonin synthesis and shortens the duration of melatonin production. DESIGN: In a retrospective analysis, we compared daily melatonin profiles in individuals living in room light (<200 lux) vs. dim light (<3 lux). PATIENTS: Healthy volunteers (n = 116, 18-30 yr) were recruited from the general population to participate in one of two studies. SETTING: Participants lived in a General Clinical Research Center for at least five consecutive days. INTERVENTION: Individuals were exposed to room light or dim light in the 8 h preceding bedtime. OUTCOME MEASURES: Melatonin duration, onset and offset, suppression, and phase angle of entrainment were determined. RESULTS: Compared with dim light, exposure to room light before bedtime suppressed melatonin, resulting in a later melatonin onset in 99.0% of individuals and shortening melatonin duration by about 90 min. Also, exposure to room light during the usual hours of sleep suppressed melatonin by greater than 50% in most (85%) trials. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that room light exerts a profound suppressive effect on melatonin levels and shortens the body's internal representation of night duration. Hence, chronically exposing oneself to electrical lighting in the late evening disrupts melatonin signaling and could therefore potentially impact sleep, thermoregulation, blood pressure, and glucose homeostasis.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. gmsjjg@nus.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21193540; PMCID:PMC3047226 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 139  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vollmer, C.; Michel, U.; Randler, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night (LAN) is correlated with eveningness in adolescents Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 4 Pages 502-508  
  Keywords Adolescent; *Adolescent Behavior/drug effects; Biological Clocks; Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage; *Circadian Rhythm/drug effects; Computers; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Germany; Humans; *Light; Lighting; Male; *Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Questionnaires; *Sleep/drug effects; Television; Time Factors; Video Games; *Wakefulness/drug effects  
  Abstract External zeitgebers synchronize the human circadian rhythm of sleep and wakefulness. Humans adapt their chronotype to the day-night cycle, the strongest external zeitgeber. The human circadian rhythm shifts to evening-type orientation when daylight is prolonged into the evening and night hours by artificial light sources. Data from a survey of 1507 German adolescents covering questions about chronotype and electronic screen media use combined with nocturnal satellite image data suggest a relationship between chronotype and artificial nocturnal light. Adolescents living in brightly illuminated urban districts had a stronger evening-type orientation than adolescents living in darker and more rural municipalities. This result persisted when controlling for time use of electronic screen media, intake of stimulants, type of school, age, puberty status, time of sunrise, sex, and population density. Time spent on electronic screen media use-a source of indoor light at night-is also correlated with eveningness, as well as intake of stimulants, age, and puberty status, and, to a lesser degree, type of school and time of sunrise. Adequate urban development design and parents limiting adolescents' electronic screen media use in the evening could help to adjust adolescents' zeitgeber to early school schedules when they provide appropriate lighting conditions for daytime and for nighttime.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Education Heidelberg, Germany. vollmer@ph-heidelberg.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22214237 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 150  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Evans, J.A.; Elliott, J.A.; Gorman, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim nighttime illumination accelerates adjustment to timezone travel in an animal model Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages R156-7  
  Keywords *Adaptation, Physiological; Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Biological Clocks/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cricetinae; Humans; *Lighting; Mesocricetus; Mice; Motor Activity/physiology; Phodopus; *Photoperiod; Time Factors  
  Abstract Jetlag reflects a mismatch between local and circadian time following rapid timezone travel [1]. Appropriately timed bright light can shift human circadian rhythms but recovery is slow (e.g., 1-2 days per timezone). Most symptoms subside after resynchronization, but chronic jetlag may have enduring negative effects [2], including even accelerated mortality in mice [3]. Melatonin, prescription drugs, and/or exercise may help shift the clock but, like bright light, require complex schedules of application [1]. Thus, there is a need for more efficient and practical treatments for addressing jetlag. In contrast to bright daytime lighting, nighttime conditions have received scant attention. By incorporating more naturalistic nighttime lighting comparable in intensity to dim moonlight, we demonstrate that recovery after simulated jetlag is accelerated when nights are dimly lit rather than completely dark.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19243688 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 152  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kloog, I.; Stevens, R.G.; Haim, A.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime light level co-distributes with breast cancer incidence worldwide Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 2059-2068  
  Keywords Adult; Birth Rate; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Carcinoma/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cohort Studies; Electricity; Female; Humans; Incidence; *Light/adverse effects; Lighting; Photoperiod; Registries; Urban Population/statistics & numerical data; World Health; oncogenesis  
  Abstract Breast cancer incidence varies widely among countries of the world for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether country-level light at night (LAN) is associated with incidence. We compared incidence rates of five common cancers in women (breast, lung, colorectal, larynx, and liver), observed in 164 countries of the world from the GLOBOCAN database, with population-weighted country-level LAN, and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including fertility rate, per capita income, percent of urban population, and electricity consumption. Two types of regression models were used in the analysis: Ordinary Least Squares and Spatial Errors. We found a significant positive association between population LAN level and incidence rates of breast cancer. There was no such an association between LAN level and colorectal, larynx, liver, and lung cancers. A sensitivity test, holding other variables at their average values, yielded a 30-50% higher risk of breast cancer in the highest LAN exposed countries compared to the lowest LAN exposed countries. The possibility that under-reporting from the registries in the low-resource, and also low-LAN, countries created a spurious association was evaluated in several ways and shown not to account for the results. These findings provide coherence of the previously reported case-control and cohort studies with the co-distribution of LAN and breast cancer in entire populations.  
  Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, University of Haifa, 31905 Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN (down) Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:20680434 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 160  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: