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Author Rockhill, A.P.; DePerno, C.S.; Powell, R.A.
Title The effect of illumination and time of day on movements of bobcats (Lynx rufus) Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 8 Issue 7 Pages e69213
Keywords (up) Animals; Female; *Lighting; Lynx/*physiology; Male; Moon; Movement/*physiology; North Carolina; Time Factors; Wetlands
Abstract Understanding behavioral changes of prey and predators based on lunar illumination provides insight into important life history, behavioral ecology, and survival information. The objectives of this research were to determine if bobcat movement rates differed by period of day (dark, moon, crepuscular, day), lunar illumination (<10%, 10 – <50%, 50 – <90%, >90%), and moon phase (new, full). Bobcats had high movement rates during crepuscular and day periods and low movement rates during dark periods with highest nighttime rates at 10-<50% lunar illumination. Bobcats had highest movement rates during daytime when nighttime illumination was low (new moon) and higher movement rates during nighttime when lunar illumination was high (full moon). The behaviors we observed are consistent with prey availability being affected by light level and by limited vision by bobcats during darkness.
Address Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. aimee_rockhill@ncsu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23861963; PMCID:PMC3704646 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 84
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Author Gao, X.; Li, X.; Zhang, M.; Chi, L.; Song, C.; Liu, Y.
Title Effects of LED light quality on the growth, survival and metamorphosis ofHaliotis discus hannaiIno larvae Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Aquaculture Research Abbreviated Journal Aquac Res
Volume 47 Issue 12 Pages 3705–3717
Keywords (up) Animals; Haliotis discus hannai Ino; larva; LED light quality; initial stage of lighting; embryonic development; abalone; photobiology
Abstract Light is a key environmental factor influencing the growth, development and survival of aquatic organisms. We examined the effects of different light qualities (red, orange, white, blue, green or no light) and developmental stage at initial lighting [fertilized egg (FE), trochophore larva (TL), or eye-spot larva (EL)] on the growth, development, and survival of larvae of the Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino. Larva-hatching success was significantly higher under blue, green, or no light compared with red, orange or white light (P < 0.05). Larval abnormalities were significantly increased under red, orange or white light compared with all other light qualities (P < 0.05). The incidence of metamorphosis in larvae illuminated from the TL stage was significantly higher under blue compared with other light qualities. Irrespective of the stage at initial illumination, the incidence of metamorphosis was lower in larvae cultured under red, orange or no light compared with other light qualities, but the differences were not significant (P > 0.05). Juvenile survival was significantly higher under blue or green compared with other light qualities (P < 0.05), with no significant effect of stage at initial illumination (P > 0.05). Larval size at completion of the shell was unaffected by stage at initial illumination, but was greater under blue or green light, while size at metamorphosis was greatest following illumination with blue or green light since the TL or EL stage (P < 0.05). Metamorphosis time was shortest with blue or green light and in cultures illuminated from the FE or TL stage (P < 0.05). Larval development from the FE to formation of the fourth tubule on the cephalic tentacles was fastest in larvae exposed since the FE or TL stage to blue or green light, compared with other light qualities (P < 0.05). However, there was no difference in terms of the rate of development from the FE to the TL stage between cultures lit or unlit since the FE egg stage (P > 0.05). These results suggest that a blue or green light source applied from the TL stage can increase the hatching and yield of H. discus hannai Ino, with important implications for the development of the aquaculture industry.
Address Research and Development Center of Marine Biotechnology, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Science, 7 Nanhai Road, Qingdao 266071, Shandong Province, China; 18354292961(at)163.com.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1355557X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1340
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Author Pendoley, K.; Kamrowski, R.
Title Influence of horizon elevation on the sea-finding behaviour of hatchling flatback turtles exposed to artificial light glow Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 529 Issue Pages 279-288
Keywords (up) Animals; Hatchling orientation; Artificial lighting; Horizon elevation; Marine turtle; Conservation management; Elevation; Industry; Coastal development; Sea turtle; Sea turtle conservation
Abstract Marine turtles are threatened globally by increasing coastal development. In particular, increased artificial lighting at the nesting beach has the potential to disrupt turtle breeding success. Few published data exist regarding the behaviour of the flatback turtle Natator depressus, a species endemic to Australia, in response to artificial light. Given the ongoing industrialisation of the Australian coastline, this study is a timely investigation into the orientation of flatback hatchlings exposed to light glow produced by lighting typically used in industrial settings. We recorded the orientation of hatchlings at the nesting beach on Barrow Island, Western Australia, exposed to 3 types of standard lighting — high-pressure sodium vapour (HPS), metal halide (MH), and fluorescent white (FW)—at 3 different intensities. The light array was positioned either behind a high dune (producing a high, dark silhouette; 16° elevation), or in a low creek bed (producing a low silhouette and bright horizon; 2° elevation). At medium and high light intensities of all 3 light types, hatchlings were significantly less ocean-oriented when exposed to light at 2° elevation compared to 16° elevation. This difference remained with glow from low-intensity MH light; however, there was no significant difference in orientation of hatchlings exposed to low- intensity HPS and FW light glow at either elevation. Our study emphasises the importance of horizon elevation cues in hatchling sea-finding. Since all species of marine turtles show similar sea-finding behaviour, our results have important implications for management of lighting adjacent to turtle nesting beaches in Australia and elsewhere, as coastal development continues.
Address Pendoley Environmental Pty Ltd, 12A Pitt Way, Booragoon, Western Australia 6154, Australia; ruth.kamrowski@penv.com.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1189
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Author Mammola, S.; Isaia, M.; Demonte, D.; Triolo, P.; Nervo, M.
Title Artificial lighting triggers the presence of urban spiders and their webs on historical buildings Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume 180 Issue Pages 187-194
Keywords (up) Animals; Lighting
Abstract Different spider species living in the urban environment spin their webs on building facades. Due to air pollution, web aggregations entrap dirt particles over time, assuming a brownish-greyish colouration and thus determining an aesthetic impact on buildings and street furniture. In Europe, the most common species causing such an aesthetic nuisance is Brigittea civica (Lucas) (Dictynidae). In spite of the socio-economical relevance of the problem, the ecological factors driving the proliferation of this species in the urban environment are poorly described and the effectiveness of potential cleaning activities has never been discussed in scientific literature. Over one year, we studied the environmental drivers of B. civica webs in the arcades of the historical down-town district of Turin (NW-Italy). We selected a number of sampling plots on arcade ceilings and we estimated the density of B. civica webs by means of digital image analysis. In parallel, we collected information on a number of potential explanatory variables driving the arcade colonization, namely artificial lighting at night, substrate temperature, distance from the main artificial light sources and distance from the river. Regression analysis showed that the coverage of spider webs increased significantly at plots with higher light intensity, with a major effect related to the presence of historical lampposts with incandescent lamps rather than halogen lamps. We also detected a seasonal variation in the web coverage, with significant higher values in summer. Stemming from our results, we are able to suggest good practices for the containment of this phenomenon.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2002
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Author Egri, Á.; Száz, D.; Farkas, A.; Pereszlényi, Á; Horváth, G.; Kriska, G.
Title Method to improve the survival of night-swarming mayflies near bridges in areas of distracting light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.
Volume 4 Issue 11 Pages 171166
Keywords (up) Animals; Lighting
Abstract Numerous negative ecological effects of urban lighting have been identified during the last decades. In spite of the development of lighting technologies, the detrimental effect of this form of light pollution has not declined. Several insect species are affected including the night-swarming mayfly Ephoron virgo: when encountering bridges during their mass swarming, these mayflies often fall victim to artificial lighting. We show a simple method for the conservation of these mayflies exploiting their positive phototaxis. With downstream-facing light-emitting diode beacon lights above two tributaries of the river Danube, we managed to guide egg-laying females to the water and prevent them from perishing outside the river near urban lights. By means of measuring the mayfly outflow from the river as a function of time and the on/off state of the beacons, we showed that the number of mayflies exiting the river's area was practically zero when our beacons were operating. Tributaries could be the sources of mayfly recolonization in case of water quality degradation of large rivers. The protection of mayfly populations in small rivers and safeguarding their aggregation and oviposition sites is therefore important.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1786
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