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Author Owen, D.
Title The Dark Side. Making war on light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication (down) The New Yorker Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 791
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Author Raynham, P.; Saksvikronning, T.
Title White Light and Facial Recognition Type Journal Article
Year 2003 Publication (down) The Lighting Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 68 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Society; Lighting
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1056
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Author Riad Saraiji, M. Saju Oommen
Title Light Pollution Index (LPI): An Integrated Approach to Study Light Pollution with Street Lighting and Façade Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication (down) The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue 2 Pages 127-145
Keywords Planning; Lighting
Abstract Rather than being complementary, street lighting and façade lighting are typically designed independently of each other. As a result, light from street lighting luminaires might spill onto building façades and influence characteristics of the façade lighting including required light levels and color. Conversely, façade lighting might reflect onto the street and contribute to the street illumination. This manuscript presents an integrated approach to analyzing the interaction between the street and façade lighting in consideration of light pollution control. A generic street model with various calculation grids was studied. It was found that a moderately lit façade contributes to a horizontal illuminance of 5 lux or more on the street and a vertical illuminance of 4 lux or more 1.5 m above the sidewalk. An over-illuminated street may result when both street and façade lighting exist without reference to each other. The size of the light-pollution calculation grid and the use of a 3-D illuminance graph were studied. It was found that fluctuations in the calculated amount of light pollution could occur unless the size of the pollution calculation grid is large enough to capture all of the upward flux. A method of achieving the optimal size of the calculation grid is demonstrated. Shortcomings of using light pollution percentage as a light pollution index are highlighted and an alternative light pollution index is proposed.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1764
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Author Gooley, J.J.; Chamberlain, K.; Smith, K.A.; Khalsa, S.B.S.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Van Reen, E.; Zeitzer, J.M.; Czeisler, C.A.; Lockley, S.W.
Title Exposure to room light before bedtime suppresses melatonin onset and shortens melatonin duration in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication (down) The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab
Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages E463-72
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Female; Humans; *Light; *Lighting; Male; Melatonin/*blood; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; Young Adult
Abstract CONTEXT: Millions of individuals habitually expose themselves to room light in the hours before bedtime, yet the effects of this behavior on melatonin signaling are not well recognized. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that exposure to room light in the late evening suppresses the onset of melatonin synthesis and shortens the duration of melatonin production. DESIGN: In a retrospective analysis, we compared daily melatonin profiles in individuals living in room light (<200 lux) vs. dim light (<3 lux). PATIENTS: Healthy volunteers (n = 116, 18-30 yr) were recruited from the general population to participate in one of two studies. SETTING: Participants lived in a General Clinical Research Center for at least five consecutive days. INTERVENTION: Individuals were exposed to room light or dim light in the 8 h preceding bedtime. OUTCOME MEASURES: Melatonin duration, onset and offset, suppression, and phase angle of entrainment were determined. RESULTS: Compared with dim light, exposure to room light before bedtime suppressed melatonin, resulting in a later melatonin onset in 99.0% of individuals and shortening melatonin duration by about 90 min. Also, exposure to room light during the usual hours of sleep suppressed melatonin by greater than 50% in most (85%) trials. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that room light exerts a profound suppressive effect on melatonin levels and shortens the body's internal representation of night duration. Hence, chronically exposing oneself to electrical lighting in the late evening disrupts melatonin signaling and could therefore potentially impact sleep, thermoregulation, blood pressure, and glucose homeostasis.
Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. gmsjjg@nus.edu
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ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:21193540; PMCID:PMC3047226 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 139
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Author Kayumov, L.; Casper, R.F.; Hawa, R.J.; Perelman, B.; Chung, S.A.; Sokalsky, S.; Shapiro, C.M.
Title Blocking low-wavelength light prevents nocturnal melatonin suppression with no adverse effect on performance during simulated shift work Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication (down) The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab
Volume 90 Issue 5 Pages 2755-2761
Keywords Lighting; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/*secretion; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract Decreases in melatonin production in human and animals are known to be caused by environmental lighting, especially short-wavelength lighting (between 470 and 525 nm). We investigated the novel hypothesis that the use of goggles with selective exclusion of all wavelengths less than 530 nm could prevent the suppression of melatonin in bright-light conditions during a simulated shift-work experiment. Salivary melatonin levels were measured under dim (<5 lux), bright (800 lux), and filtered (800 lux) light at hourly intervals between 2000 and 0800 h in 11 healthy young males and eight females (mean age, 24.7 +/- 4.6 yr). The measurements were performed during three nonconsecutive nights over a 2-wk period. Subjective sleepiness was measured by self-report scales, whereas objective performance was assessed with the Continuous Performance Test. All subjects demonstrated preserved melatonin levels in filtered light similar to their dim-light secretion profile. Unfiltered bright light drastically suppressed melatonin production. Normalization of endogenous melatonin production while wearing goggles did not impair measures of performance, subjective sleepiness, or alertness.
Address Sleep Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, ECW 3D-035, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. lkayumov@uhnres.utoronto.ca
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ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:15713707 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 640
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