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Author Kinzey, B.R.; Perrin, T.E.; Miller, N.J.; Kocifaj, M.; Aubé, M.; Lamphar, H.A. openurl 
  Title An investigation of LED street lighting's impact on sky glow Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume PNNL-26411 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; Lighting  
  Abstract A significant amount of public attention has recently focused on perceived impacts of converting street lighting from incumbent lamp-based products to LED technology. Much of this attention pertains to the higher content of short wavelength light (commonly referred to as “blue light”) of LEDs and its attendant influences on sky glow (a brightening of the night sky that can interfere with astronomical observation and may be associated with a host of other issues). The complexity of this topic leads to common misunderstandings and misperceptions among the public, and for this reason the U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Program embarked on a study of sky glow using a well-established astronomical model to investigate some of the primary factors influencing sky glow. This report details the results of the investigation and attempts to present those results in terms accessible to the general lighting community. The report also strives to put the results into a larger context, and help educate interested readers on various topics relevant to the issues being discussed.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States) Thesis  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2014  
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Author O'Connell, H. A. url  openurl
  Title Streetlights in the city: understanding the distribution of Houston streetlights Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Society  
  Abstract There are at least 173,724 streetlights in the city of Houston, or about 15 streetlights per mile of roadway in the average Houston neighborhood. But there is wide variation in streetlight density across those neighborhoods. This report offers several important findings. First, black and Hispanic neighborhoods have higher concentrations of streetlights than white neighborhoods. Second, mixed-income neighborhoods tend to have higher concentrations of streetlights than the city’s wealthiest and poorest neighborhoods.

In the context of this discussion, we should consider the possibility that some areas of the city are overly lit in addition to being concerned about the places without enough lights. There may be a point at which having more lights actually becomes a negative. We need to get a better understanding of the lived consequences of the level of available lighting before making any further decisions regarding city streetlights.
 
  Address  
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  Publisher Rice | Kinder Institute for urban research Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2068  
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Author Foth, M., Caldwell, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title More-than-human media architecture Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Architecture; Lighting; Planning  
  Abstract We consider some of the planetary conditions and global circumstances that both research and practice of media architecture are embedded within, such as climate change, pollution, resource consumption, and loss of biodiversity. While there has been a notable increase in emphasis on participation and engagement in design and use, with the aim to increase the involvement of diverse and often marginalised citizens, a human-centred approach to media architecture comes with its own set of problems. In this paper, we want to draw the attention of the media architecture community to the fallacy of human exceptionalism and anthropocentrism. We present a critical review of examples of media architecture projects and installations that question our understanding of urban space as separate from nature, and designed primarily for humans and just humans. Informed by studies in disciplines such as science and technology studies, critical geography, urban planning, and interaction design, we use insights derived from our review to discuss ways towards a more-than-human approach to media architecture. We conclude by proposing for discussion nascent design considerations for media architecture to go beyond the needs of just humans and to consider new ways to appreciate and cater for our broader ecological entanglements with plants, animals, and the environment at large.  
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  Area Expedition Conference Media Architecture Biennale, 13-16 November 2018, Beijing, China  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2081  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wallace, H. D. openurl 
  Title Electric Lighting Policy in the Federal Government, 1880-2016 Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords History; Policy; Lighting  
  Abstract Federal policies have targeted electric lighting since the 1880s with varying success. This dissertation examines the history of those policies to understand policy makers’ intent and how their decisions affected the course of events. This qualitative study poses three research questions: How have changes in lamp efficacy affected policy development? How and why have federal policies targeted electric lighting? How have private sector actors adapted public policy to further their own goals? The analysis uses an interdisciplinary approach taking advantage of overlapping methodologies drawn from policy and political sciences, economics, and the history of technology. The concepts of path dependency, context, and actor networks are especially important. Adoption of electric lighting spurred the construction of complex and capital intensive infrastructures now considered indispensable, and lighting always consumed a significant fraction of US electric power. Engineers and scientists created many lamps over the decades, in part to meet a growing demand for energy efficient products. Invention and diffusion of those lamps occurred amid changing standards and definitions of efficiency, shifting relations between network actors, and the development of path dependencies that constrained efforts to affect change. Federal actors typically used lighting policy to conserve resources, promote national security, or to symbolically emphasize the onset of a national crisis. The study shows that after an initial introductory phase, lighting-specific policies developed during two distinct periods. The earlier period consisted of intermittent, crisis-driven federal interventions of mixed success. The later period featured a sustained engagement between public and private sectors wherein incremental adjustments achieved policy goals. A time of transition occurred between the two main periods during which technical, economic, and political contexts changed, while several core social values remained constant. In both early and later periods, private sector actors used policy opportunities to further commercial goals, a practice that public sector actors in the later period used to promote policy acceptance. Recently enacted energy standards removing ordinary incandescent lamps in favor of high efficiency lamps mark the end of the later period. Apparent success means that policy makers should reconsider how they use lighting to achieve future goals.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher University of Maryland Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2210  
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Author Ringwald, R.; Rönitzsch, H.; Riedel, M. url  openurl
  Title Praxishandbuch Öffentliche Beleuchtung – Wirtschaftlichkeit, Recht, Technik Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) 1. Aufl. DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V., hrsg., Berlin Wien Zürich: Beuth Verlags GmbH. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1058  
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