toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Stevens, R.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-at-night, circadian disruption and breast cancer: assessment of existing evidence Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication (up) International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Int J Epidemiol  
  Volume 38 Issue 4 Pages 963-970  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Blindness/complications/epidemiology; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/metabolism; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/epidemiology/metabolism; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Light Signal Transduction/physiology; Lighting/adverse effects; Melatonin/biosynthesis; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence is increasing globally for largely unknown reasons. The possibility that a portion of the breast cancer burden might be explained by the introduction and increasing use of electricity to light the night was suggested >20 years ago. METHODS: The theory is based on nocturnal light-induced disruption of circadian rhythms, notably reduction of melatonin synthesis. It has formed the basis for a series of predictions including that non-day shift work would increase risk, blind women would be at lower risk, long sleep duration would lower risk and community nighttime light level would co-distribute with breast cancer incidence on the population level. RESULTS: Accumulation of epidemiological evidence has accelerated in recent years, reflected in an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification of shift work as a probable human carcinogen (2A). There is also a strong rodent model in support of the light-at-night (LAN) idea. CONCLUSION: If a consensus eventually emerges that LAN does increase risk, then the mechanisms for the effect are important to elucidate for intervention and mitigation. The basic understanding of phototransduction for the circadian system, and of the molecular genetics of circadian rhythm generation are both advancing rapidly, and will provide for the development of lighting technologies at home and at work that minimize circadian disruption, while maintaining visual efficiency and aesthetics. In the interim, there are strategies now available to reduce the potential for circadian disruption, which include extending the daily dark period, appreciate nocturnal awakening in the dark, using dim red light for nighttime necessities, and unless recommended by a physician, not taking melatonin tablets.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19380369; PMCID:PMC2734067 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 527  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Valentová, M.; Quicheron, M.; Bertoldi, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title LED Projects and Economic Test Cases in Europe Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication (up) International Journal of Green Energy Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Green Energy  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages 843-851  
  Keywords Economics; Lighting  
  Abstract Solid-State Lighting (SSL) is a fast evolving, promising energy-efficient technology, offering a wide range of potential uses. The article presents the status of the existing light emitting diode (LED) pilot actions in Europe, analyzing 106 LED test cases from 17 European countries. Projects from the public and commercial sectors form the focus of this article, with special attention devoted to the economics of LED projects – particularly in terms of energy savings. The results of the test cases demonstrate wide variation. Installations offer energy savings of 59% on average (savings range from 10% to more than 90%). In many applications, LEDs are competitive (with payback time ranging from two to 10 years), yet a large number of projects are still in the trial phase. From the test cases reviewed, the most successful applications are, in terms of savings and economic considerations, replacement of both (1) incandescent light bulbs in traffic light systems, and (2) halogen spotlights in indoor applications. The LED projects bring many co-benefits, including lower maintenance costs, improved lighting characteristics, or improved ambience. Some challenges remain to be addressed, such as to improve the quality characteristics of LEDs and the quality of information and data provided by manufacturers/suppliers, and optimality of LED technology for existing street lighting systems.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1543-5075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1631  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bauer, S.E.; Wagner, S.E.; Burch, J.; Bayakly, R.; Vena, J.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (up) International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal Int J Health Geogr  
  Volume 12 Issue Pages 23  
  Keywords Human Health; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Georgia/epidemiology; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Registries; Risk Factors  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. METHODS: Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000-2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992-2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0-20 watts per sterradian cm(2)), medium (21-41 watts per sterradian cm(2)), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm(2)). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. RESULTS: Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15-50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. secbauer@ufl.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23594790; PMCID:PMC3651306 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 718  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, J.; Le, L.-T.; Le, H.-T.; Liao, H.-Y.; Huang, G.-Z.; Ma, H.-Y.; Wen, C.-C.; Fang, Y.C.; Chen, C.-H.; Chang, S.-H.; Lee, H.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Low-Glare Freeform-Surfaced Street Light Luminaire Optimization to Meet Enhanced Road Lighting Standards Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) International Journal of Optics Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Optics  
  Volume 2020 Issue Pages 1-12  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract To enhance driving safety at night, a new freeform-surface street light luminaire was proposed and evaluated in this study that meets the requirements of the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) M3 class standard for road lighting. The luminaire was designed using simulations to optimize the location of the bulb according to the requirements of the standard. The light source IES file was experimentally obtained for the optimized luminaire prototype with a 150 W ceramic metal halide lamp using an imaging goniophotometer. The trial road lighting simulation results computed by the lighting software DIALux indicated that the proposed luminaire provided an average road surface brightness of 1.1 cd/m2 (compared to a minimum requirement of 1.0 cd/m2), a brightness uniformity of 0.41 (compared to a minimum requirement of 0.4), a longitudinal brightness uniformity of 0.64 (compared to a minimum requirement of 0.6), and a glare factor of 7.6% (compared to a maximum limit of 15%). The findings of the image goniophotometer tests were then confirmed by the results of a certified mirror goniophotometer test conducted by the Taiwan Accreditation Foundation (TAF). The results of this study can be used to provide improved street lighting designs to meet enhanced international standards.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1687-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3103  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Agbo David, O., Madukwe Chinaza, A., & Anyalewechi Chika, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Development of Solar Power Intelligent Street Lights System Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Energy  
  Abstract The lack of natural light during night time in the urban environment has always been a problem. From people not being able to see where they are going, to the greater chance of being attacked or mugged at night which as we all know is a problem that has been in existence since humans started living together. The main advantage of this system exists in the reduction of costs related to energy consumption by the street light by integrating a vehicle/human detection algorithm into the system. The introduction of this vehicle/human detection algorithm further reduces the power consumption costs. In this project, solar PV is used to supply the energy to charge the battery. The battery later powers the operation of the whole system. The 12- 17V of the solar is buck to a steady 12V for battery charging. A light sensor is connected to the microcontroller that sense the light during day time, when the presence of day light is sensed the microcontroller turns ON the mosfet of the buck converter. If the voltage of the solar PV is greater than 12V, it charges the battery and switches off the load transistor. But at dawn, when the solar PV voltage is less than 12V the microcontroller turn OFF the buck converter mosfet and switch ON the load transistor. When no vehicle or human is detected for 10mins the microcontroller dims the LED lamp. If vehicle or human is detected the microcontroller brighten the LED lamp and inform the next microcontroller to brighten its LED lamp. If the next street light did not detect a vehicle or human after 10 mins it dims the lamp but if it detects a vehicle or human the lamp remain brightened. The microcontroller uses the ultrasonic sensor to detect object and the PIR sensor to detect human. The RF module is used for communication between the microcontrollers to inform each other the presence of vehicle or human.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2971  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: