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Author Kempenaers, B.; Borgstrom, P.; Loes, P.; Schlicht, E.; Valcu, M.
Title Artificial night lighting affects dawn song, extra-pair siring success, and lay date in songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 20 Issue 19 Pages 1735-1739
Keywords Animals; Environmental Pollution; Female; Light; *Lighting; Male; *Reproduction; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Songbirds/*physiology; Time Factors; *Vocalization, Animal
Abstract Associated with a continued global increase in urbanization, anthropogenic light pollution is an important problem. However, our understanding of the ecological consequences of light pollution is limited. We investigated effects of artificial night lighting on dawn song in five common forest-breeding songbirds. In four species, males near street lights started singing significantly earlier at dawn than males elsewhere in the forest, and this effect was stronger in naturally earlier-singing species. We compared reproductive behavior of blue tits breeding in edge territories with and without street lights to that of blue tits breeding in central territories over a 7 year period. Under the influence of street lights, females started egg laying on average 1.5 days earlier. Males occupying edge territories with street lights were twice as successful in obtaining extra-pair mates than their close neighbors or than males occupying central forest territories. Artificial night lighting affected both age classes but had a stronger effect on yearling males. Our findings indicate that light pollution has substantial effects on the timing of reproductive behavior and on individual mating patterns. It may have important evolutionary consequences by changing the information embedded in previously reliable quality-indicator traits.
Address Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard-Gwinner-Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany. b.kempenaers@orn.mpg.de
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20850324 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 51
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Author Riley, W.D.; Bendall, B.; Ives, M.J.; Edmonds, N.J.; Maxwell, D.L.
Title Street lighting disrupts the diel migratory pattern of wild Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., smolts leaving their natal stream Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Aquaculture Abbreviated Journal Aquaculture
Volume 330-333 Issue Pages 74-81
Keywords Artificial light; Behaviour; Migration; Salmon; Smolt; Street lighting
Abstract The migratory timing and behaviour of wild Atlantic salmon smolts leaving their natal stream was determined using a passive integrated transponder (PIT) antennae system at a study site on a tributary of the River Itchen, England. Experiments compared the downstream migration of smolts under natural control conditions (2000–2006) with two years (2008 and 2009) when the main downstream exit of the study site was subject to street-lit conditions every alternate night (maximum light intensity measured at the stream surface = 14 lx). Migration of smolts under control conditions was significantly (p < 0.01, n = 170) correlated with sunset. By contrast, street lighting resulted in the timing of migration being random (p = 0.11, n = 7; p = 0.76, n = 34, respectively) with respect to time of day. Furthermore, migration of smolts was significantly (p = 0.01, n = 19) correlated with the time of sunset for fish migrating when the lamp had been off, but random (p = 0.36, n = 22) when the lamp had been on (2008 and 2009 data, combined). This alteration in migratory behaviour due to street lighting may impact fitness.
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ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 69
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Author Sella, K.N.; Salmon, M.; Witherington, B.E.
Title Filtered Streetlights Attract Hatchling Marine Turtles Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal Chelonian Conservation and Biology
Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 255-261
Keywords Reptilia; Testudines; Cheloniidae; Loggerhead turtle; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; hatchlings; artificial lighting; light “trapping”; orientation; seafinding; Florida
Abstract On many nesting beaches, hatchling marine turtles are exposed to poled street lighting that disrupts their ability to crawl to the sea. Experiments were done to determine how hatchlings responded to street lighting transmitted through 2 filters that excluded the most disruptive wavelengths (those <&#8201;530 nm; those <&#8201;570 nm). Filtered lighting, however, also attracted the turtles though not as strongly as an unfiltered (high-pressure sodium vapor) lighting. Filtering is therefore of limited utility for light management, especially since other alternatives (such as lowering, shielding, or turning off unnecessary lighting; use of dimmer lights embedded in roadways) are more effective.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title (down) Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1071-8443 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 78
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Author Rockhill, A.P.; DePerno, C.S.; Powell, R.A.
Title The effect of illumination and time of day on movements of bobcats (Lynx rufus) Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 8 Issue 7 Pages e69213
Keywords Animals; Female; *Lighting; Lynx/*physiology; Male; Moon; Movement/*physiology; North Carolina; Time Factors; Wetlands
Abstract Understanding behavioral changes of prey and predators based on lunar illumination provides insight into important life history, behavioral ecology, and survival information. The objectives of this research were to determine if bobcat movement rates differed by period of day (dark, moon, crepuscular, day), lunar illumination (<10%, 10 – <50%, 50 – <90%, >90%), and moon phase (new, full). Bobcats had high movement rates during crepuscular and day periods and low movement rates during dark periods with highest nighttime rates at 10-<50% lunar illumination. Bobcats had highest movement rates during daytime when nighttime illumination was low (new moon) and higher movement rates during nighttime when lunar illumination was high (full moon). The behaviors we observed are consistent with prey availability being affected by light level and by limited vision by bobcats during darkness.
Address Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. aimee_rockhill@ncsu.edu
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:23861963; PMCID:PMC3704646 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 84
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Author Evans, J.A.; Carter, S.N.; Freeman, D.A.; Gorman, M.R.
Title Dim nighttime illumination alters photoperiodic responses of hamsters through the intergeniculate leaflet and other photic pathways Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience
Volume 202 Issue Pages 300-308
Keywords Animals; Biological Clocks/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cricetinae; Darkness; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Geniculate Bodies/*physiology; *Lighting; Male; Motor Activity/physiology; Phodopus; *Photoperiod; Visual Pathways/*physiology
Abstract In mammals, light entrains the central pacemaker within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through both a direct neuronal projection from the retina and an indirect projection from the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) of the thalamus. Although light comparable in intensity to moonlight is minimally effective at resetting the phase of the circadian clock, dimly lit and completely dark nights are nevertheless perceived differentially by the circadian system, even when nighttime illumination is below putative thresholds for phase resetting. Under a variety of experimental paradigms, dim nighttime illumination exerts effects that may be characterized as enhancing the plasticity of circadian entrainment. For example, relative to completely dark nights, dimly lit nights accelerate development of photoperiodic responses of Siberian hamsters transferred from summer to winter day lengths. Here we assess the neural pathways underlying this response by testing whether IGL lesions eliminate the effects of dim nighttime illumination under short day lengths. Consistent with previous work, dimly lit nights facilitated the expansion of activity duration under short day lengths. Ablation of the IGL, moreover, did not influence photoperiodic responses in animals held under completely dark nights. However, among animals that were provided dimly lit nights, IGL lesions prevented the short-day typical expansion of activity duration as well as the seasonally appropriate gonadal regression and reduction in body weight. Thus, the present data indicate that the IGL plays a central role in mediating the facilitative effects of dim nighttime illumination under short day lengths, but in the absence of the IGL, dim light at night influences photoperiodic responses through residual photic pathways.
Address Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. jevans@msm.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22155265; PMCID:PMC3578228 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 87
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