toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links (down)
Author Lin, Y.; Liu, Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhu, X.; Lai, J.; Heynderickx, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Model predicting discomfort glare caused by LED road lights Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Optics Express Abbreviated Journal Opt. Express  
  Volume 22 Issue 15 Pages 18056  
  Keywords LED; LED lighting; glare; road safety; traffic  
  Abstract To model discomfort glare from LED road lighting, the effect of four key variables on perceived glare was explored. These variables were: the average glare source luminance (Lg), the background luminance (Lb), the solid angle of the glare source from the perspective of the viewer; and the angle between the glare source and the line of sight. Based on these four variables 72 different light conditions were simulated in a scaled experimental set-up. Participants were requested to judge the perceived discomfort glare of these light conditions using the deBoer rating scale. All four variables and some of their interactions had indeed a significant effect on the deBoer rating. Based on these findings, we developed a model, and tested its general applicability in various verification experiments, including laboratory conditions as well as real road conditions. This verification proved the validity of the model with a correlation between measured and predicted values as high as 0.87 and a residual deviation of about 1 unit on the deBoer rating scale. These results filled the gap in estimating discomfort glare of LED road lighting and clarified similarities of and differences in discomfort glare between LED and traditional light sources.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1094-4087 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 351  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaston, K.J.; Bennie, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Demographic effects of artificial nighttime lighting on animal populations Type Book Chapter
  Year 2014 Publication Environmental Reviews Abbreviated Journal Environ. Rev.  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 323-330  
  Keywords diurnal; lighting; night; nocturnal; light pollution; light at night; Photoperiodism; demography; demographics; population dynamics  
  Abstract Artificial lighting, especially but not exclusively through street lights, has transformed the nighttime environment in much of the world. Impacts have been identified across multiple levels of biological organization and process. The influences, however, on population dynamics, particularly through the combined effects on the key demographic rates (immigration, births, deaths, emigration) that determine where individual species occur and in what numbers, have not previously been well characterized. The majority of attention explicitly on demographic parameters to date has been placed on the attraction of organisms to lights, and thus effectively local immigration, the large numbers of individuals that can be involved, and then to some extent the mortality that can often result. Some of the most important influences of nighttime lighting, however, are likely more subtle and less immediately apparent to the human observer. Particularly significant are effects of nighttime lighting on demography that act through (i) circadian clocks and photoperiodism and thence on birth rates; (ii) time partitioning and thence on death rates; and (iii) immigration/emigration through constraining the movements of individuals amongst habitat networks, especially as a consequence of continuously lit linear features such as roads and footpaths. Good model organisms are required to enable the relative consequences of such effects to be effectively determined, and a wider consideration of the effects of artificial light at night is needed in demographic studies across a range of species.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Canadian Science Publishing Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1181-8700 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 317  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Owen, D. url  openurl
  Title The Dark Side. Making war on light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication The New Yorker Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 791  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wieduwilt, A.; Alsat, E.A.; Blickwedel, J.; Strizek, B.; Di Battista, C.; Lachner, A.B.; Plischke, H.; Melaku, T.; Muller, A.; Bagci, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dramatically altered environmental lighting conditions in women with high-risk pregnancy during hospitalization Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Pregnant women; circadian rhythm; color temperatures; hospital light environmental; illuminance; indoor  
  Abstract The maternal circadian time structure is incredibly important in the entrainment and programing of the fetal and newborn circadian time structure. Natural sunlight is the primary environmental time cue for entrainment of circadian rhythms, but high-risk pregnant women spend most of their time indoors with artificial light sources and extremely low levels of natural light both during the day and night. Because the daily level, timing, duration of light exposure and its spectral properties are important in maintaining the normal circadian physiology in humans, we aimed to evaluate the environmental lighting conditions in high-risk pregnant women admitted to hospital for long-term stay. About 30 patients were included in the study. Exposed illuminance, color temperature and effective circadian radiation dose were measured and recorded every 10 s by light dosimeters attached to the patients' clothing. We documented the illuminance of 29 pregnant women on 235 inpatient days. Median (IQR) measured illuminance was 70 (28-173) lux in the morning, 124 (63-241) lux in the afternoon, 19 (6-53) lux in the evening and 0 (0-0) lux at the night. Median illuminance for the 235 inpatient days of assessment was below the recommended EU standard of 100 lux-60.5% of the mornings and 42.7% of the afternoons. The women confined to indoor locations rarely achieved an illuminances more than 300 lux in the morning and in the afternoon. Compared to women with outdoor mobility, those confined indoors have a significantly lower illuminance and color temperature, both in the morning and in the afternoon. Our study presents the first information about the dramatically altered environmental lighting conditions experienced by high-risk pregnant women during their hospital stay. Their exposure to light while in the hospital is significantly lower than exposure to natural daylight levels and below the recommended EU standard.  
  Address Department of Neonatology and Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine, Children's Hospital, University of Bonn , Bonn, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32752886 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3061  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Takemura, Y.; Ito, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Okano, K.; Okano, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Adaptive light: a lighting control method aligned with dark adaptation of human vision Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 11204  
  Keywords Human Health; Vision; Lighting  
  Abstract Light exposure before sleep causes a reduction in the quality and duration of sleep. In order to reduce these detrimental effects of light exposure, it is important to dim the light. However, dimming the light often causes inconvenience and can lower the quality of life (QOL). We therefore aimed to develop a lighting control method for use before going to bed, in which the illuminance of lights can be ramped down with less of a subjective feeling of changes in illuminance. We performed seven experiments in a double-blind, randomized crossover design. In each experiment, we compared two lighting conditions. We examined constant illuminance, linear dimming, and three monophasic and three biphasic exponential dimming, to explore the fast and slow increases in visibility that reflect the dark adaptation of cone and rod photoreceptors in the retina, respectively. Finally, we developed a biphasic exponential dimming method termed Adaptive Light 1.0. Adaptive Light 1.0 significantly prevented the misidentification seen in constant light and effectively suppressed perceptions of the illuminance change. This novel lighting method will help to develop new intelligent lighting instruments that reduce the negative effect of light on sleep and also lower energy consumption.  
  Address The Smart Life Science Institute, ACROSS, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan. okano@waseda.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32641723; PMCID:PMC7343865 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3050  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: