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Author Laze, K. url  openurl
  Title Assessing Public Perceptions about Road Lighting in five Neighborhoods of Tirana, Albania Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Public Safety; Psychology; Roadway lighting; Albania; Europe  
  Abstract Lighting is essential for sight, human health and well-being, emerging the need for assessing exterior lighting to better understand how far public is satisfied about exterior lighting. Exterior lighting was assessed in five major roads of the capital city of Tirana, Albania, in November 2017. Security, obstacle detection and visibility were evaluated using questionnaires for road lighting. The approximately 87 and 60 percent of respondents, respectively, were not able to detect a pavement obstacle after-dark and to distinguish a

familiar face at a distance of 5 m and 10 m along roads. Road lighting after-dark was unsatisfactory to 60 percent of respondents. These findings identified road lighting could be inadequate for users, requiring further investigation and new data collection of road lighting in neighborhoods of Tirana.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2651  
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Author Haddock, J., K., Threlfall, C. G., Law, B., & Hochuli, D. F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Responses of insectivorous bats and nocturnal insects to local changes in street light technology Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Austral Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 44 Issue 6 Pages 1052-1064  
  Keywords Animals; Mammals; Bats; Chalinolobus gouldii; Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis; Australia; LED; lighting; street lighting  
  Abstract Artificial light at night is a pervasive anthropogenic stressor for biodiversity. Many fast‐flying insectivorous bat species feed on insects that are attracted to light‐emitting ultraviolet radiation (10–400 nm). Several countries are currently focused on replacing mercury vapour lamps, which emit ultraviolet light, with more cost‐efficient light‐emitting diode (LED) lights, which emit less ultraviolet radiation. This reduction in ultraviolet light may cause declines in insect densities in cities, predatory fast‐flying bats, and some edge‐foraging and slow‐flying bats. Capitalising on a scheme to update streetlights from high ultraviolet mercury vapour to low ultraviolet LED in Sydney, Australia, we measured the activity of individual bat species, the activity of different functional groups and the bat and insect communities, before and after the change in technology. We also surveyed sites with already LED lights, sites with mercury vapour lights and unlit bushland remnants. Species adapted to foraging in cluttered vegetation, and some edge‐space foraging species, were more active in unlit bushland sites than in all lit sites and decreased in activity at lit sites after the change to LED lights. The change to LED streetlights caused a decrease in the fast‐flying Chalinolobus gouldii but not Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis, the latter being more influenced by seasonal and environmental variables. Insect biomass was not affected by changing light types, but instead was negatively correlated with the moon's percentage illuminance. Changing streetlights to LEDs could result in a decline in some insectivorous bats in cities. This study confirms that unlit urban bushland remnants are important refuges for high bat diversity, particularly for more clutter‐adapted species and some edge‐space foraging species. Preventing light penetration into unlit bushland patches and corridors remains essential to protect the urban bat community.  
  Address School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, Heydon‐Laurence Building, Science Road, Sydney, New South Wales, 2006 Australia; joanna.haddock(at)sydney.edu.au  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2636  
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Author Marchant, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do brighter, whiter street lights improve road safety? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Significance Abbreviated Journal Significance  
  Volume 16 Issue 5 Pages 8-9  
  Keywords Public Safety; Lighting; Statistics  
  Abstract Would a billion‐dollar investment in improved street lighting make Australian roads safer at night? Paul Marchant finds the evidence wanting  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1740-9705 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2686  
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Author Zielińska-Dąbkowska, K. url  openurl
  Title Home Sweet Home. Connecting the dots for healthy evening residential illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication ARC Lighting In Architecture Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 55-60  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health  
  Abstract During the twentieth century, lighting designers would commonly use incandescent light sources for residential homes as they provided a visual comfort, with high quality colour rendering properties, along with relaxing ambient atmosphere. Unfortunately, it’s now difficult to buy incandescent light sources because they have been banned in many countries (https://bit.ly/2GwN2Wv). This article addresses some of the challenges in regards to health, brought about by the changeover to new LEDs and other related technologies, and tries to offer some context on how to keep up with these rapid transformations. While we know it’s necessary to limit blue-rich light at night (as it prevents melatonin production and impaires nocturnal sleep), and that it’s important to maximise exposure to the blue wavelength of light in the morning (to trigger circadian timing, increase alertness), there are other issues that are misunderstood and often ignored. This includes flicker from LEDs and electromagnetic fields (EMFs), which can be produced by smart home lighting technology.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2726  
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Author Straka, T.M.; Greif, S.; Schultz, S.; Goerlitz, H.R.; Voigt, C.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of cave illumination on bats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Global Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Global Ecology and Conservation  
  Volume 21 Issue Pages e00808  
  Keywords Animals; Lighting  
  Abstract Artificial light at night has large impacts on nocturnal wildlife such as bats, yet its effect varies with wavelength of light, context, and across species involved. Here, we studied in two experiments how wild bats of cave-roosting species (Rhinolophus mehelyi, R. euryale, Myotis capaccinii and Miniopterus schreibersii) respond to LED lights of different colours. In dual choice experiments, we measured the acoustic activity of bats in response to neutral-white, red or amber LED at a cave entrance and in a flight room – mimicking a cave interior. In the flight room, M. capaccinii and M. schreibersii preferred red to white light, but showed no preference for red over amber, or amber over white light. In the cave entrance experiment, all light colours reduced the activity of all emerging species, yet red LED had the least negative effect. Rhinolophus species reacted most strongly, matching their refusal to fly at all under any light treatment in the flight room. We conclude that the placement and light colour of LED light should be considered carefully in lighting concepts for caves both in the interior and at the entrance. In a cave interior, red LED light could be chosen – if needed at all – for careful temporary illumination of areas, yet areas important for bats should be avoided based on the precautionary principle. At cave entrances, the high sensitivity of most bat species, particularly of Rhinolophus spp., towards light sources almost irrespective of colour, calls for utmost caution when illuminating cave entrances.  
  Address  
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  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2351-9894 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2700  
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