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Author Stefani, O.; Freyburger, M.; Veitz, S.; Basishvili, T.; Meyer, M.; Weibel, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Shirakawa, Y.; Cajochen, C.
Title Changing color and intensity of LED lighting across the day impacts on circadian melatonin rhythms and sleep in healthy men Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume in press Issue Pages e12714
Keywords Human health; Lighting; cognition; humans; male; melatonin; non-visual effects of light; sleep; wakefulness
Abstract We examined whether dynamically changing light across a scheduled 16-h waking day influences sleepiness, cognitive performance, visual comfort, melatonin secretion, and sleep under controlled laboratory conditions in healthy men. Fourteen participants underwent a 49-h laboratory protocol in a repeated-measures study design. They spent the first 5-h in the evening under standard lighting, followed by an 8-h nocturnal sleep episode at habitual bedtimes. Thereafter, volunteers either woke up to static light or to a dynamic light that changed spectrum and intensity across the scheduled 16-h waking day. Following an 8-h nocturnal sleep episode, the volunteers spent another 11-h either under static or dynamic light. Static light attenuated the evening rise in melatonin levels more compared to dynamic light as indexed by a significant reduction in the melatonin AUC prior to bedtime during static light only. Participants felt less vigilant in the evening during dynamic light. After dynamic light, sleep latency was significantly shorter in both the baseline and treatment night while sleep structure, sleep quality, cognitive performance and visual comfort did not significantly differ. The study shows that dynamic changes in spectrum and intensity of light promote melatonin secretion and sleep initiation in healthy men.
Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences (MCN), University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
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ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33378563 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3219
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Author Mills, W.; Martin, K.; Cathey, J.
Title Light and Lighting Basics for OSH Professionals Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Professional Safety Abbreviated Journal
Volume 65 Issue 07 Pages 22-30
Keywords Review; Human Health; Lighting; Safety
Abstract Visible light is all around us, from sunlight to street lighting and automobile headlights to the backlight on a smartphone and in nearly every indoor space. Humans are so accustomed to working and living in artificial light that many of us have not stopped to consider the implications. Most OSH professionals’ experience with light and artificial lighting is likely limited to assessing whether sufficient light exists for people to see where they are going or carry out a task, or whether a light is too bright. This article aims to provide a current review of lighting for OSH professionals. Such a review is timely due to emerging issues including energy efficiency, human health impacts (e.g., blue light hazard, circadian rhythm disruption, fatigue), human performance (e.g., visual performance, visual comfort) and environmental impacts (e.g., light pollution).
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ISSN 0099-0027 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3222
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Author Ardavani O.
Title Alternatives to artificial lighting: Varying patterns of bio-light in architecture Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Archidoct Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 80-91
Keywords Lighting
Abstract The notion of variability is identical to the phenomenon of light.The present paper examines characteristics that shape this variability, in all forms of light, both natural and artificial, as well as light that is experimentally produced in a laboratory environment, through genetic modification of plants, in line with current trend of architectural fluidity. At a time when architecture is interacting with emerging technologies by creating parametrically changing shells and environments, that are evolving as biological models and organisms, lighting is becoming a tool for highlighting forms while ensuring the functionality of spaces. It is up to the designer to manage these variables of light in an inspired way, in order to create an elegant, sustainable and environmentally friendly environment for all beings.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2309-0103 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3223
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Author Kretzer, D. M.; Walczak, M.
Title The Impact of Vertical Densification on Public Lighting in Informal Settlements: Using Virtual Environments as an Evaluation Tool for Policy Making Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Athens Journal of Architecture Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Lighting
Abstract There are a variety of reasons to support the premise that public lighting is beneficial to urban communities. At the same time, a key challenge for the provision of public lighting in informal settlements is their constant physical transformation. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the application of virtual environments (VEs) in lighting planning and policy making. Despite the fact that VEs offer the opportunity to explore an environment by freely navigating through it, including environments that change over time, this feature is rarely taken into account in decision-making processes. A VE-based analysis tool for informal settlement lighting is presented using a case-study street in the informal settlement of Caracolí in Bogotá as its basis. The main data set for the VE scenarios was comprised of results from a household survey, spatial measurements, and participant observations as well as luminous intensity distribution curves. The household survey was used to collect time-related data on the incremental construction of Caracoli's informal dwellings, which was then projected into past, present, and future night-time scenarios. The lighting quality of these different scenarios was systematically evaluated via lighting calculation software, revealing a variety of shortcomings caused by the current lighting approach. Based on these findings, an alternative lighting approach was developed and re-examined using lighting calculations. Finally, custom game-engine technology and GPU computing were deployed, which allowed for real-time visualisation of the different lighting scenarios and their lighting quality. This setup therefore enables fast iterative feedback loops for current and future lighting policy scenarios and the resulting lighting design. In the first instance, a VE can illustrate well how current lighting policy results in a significant delay of lighting provision in the early stage of a settlement as well as highlight the mismatch between lighting technology and the built environment during the vertical densification phases. Second, the VE is able to showcase alternative lighting technologies and policy approaches as well as the resulting lighting effects, enabling a visual comparison of different policy scenarios over several decades. In conclusion it will be argued that the dynamic VE technology appears to be a promising decision-making tool for illustrating potential planning and design shortcomings to policy stakeholders in a manner understandable to the layman.
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Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3226
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Author Clarke, R.B.; Amini, H.; James, P.; von Euler-Chelpin, M.; Jorgensen, J.T.; Mehta, A.; Cole-Hunter, T.; Westendorp, R.; Mortensen, L.H.; Loft, S.; Brandt, J.; Hertel, O.; Ketzel, M.; Backalarz, C.; Andersen, Z.J.; Lim, Y.-H.
Title Outdoor light at night and breast cancer incidence in the Danish Nurse Cohort Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environ Res
Volume 194 Issue Pages 110631
Keywords Human health; Remote sensing; Breast neoplasms; Environmental exposure; Female; Incidence; Lighting; Middle-aged; Prospective studies; Risk factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the role of melatonin, xenograft experiments, and epidemiological studies suggests that exposure to light at night (LAN) may disturb circadian rhythms, possibly increasing the risk of developing breast cancer. OBJECTIVES: We examined the association between residential outdoor LAN and the incidence of breast cancer: overall and subtypes classified by estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor status. METHODS: We used data on 16,941 nurses from the Danish Nurse Cohort who were followed-up from the cohort baseline in 1993 or 1999 through 2012 in the Danish Cancer Registry for breast cancer incidence and the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group for breast cancer ER and PR status. LAN exposure data were obtained from the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) available for 1996, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2006, and 2010 in nW/cm(2)/sr unit, and assigned to the study participants' residence addresses during the follow-up. Time-varying Cox regression models were used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between LAN and breast cancer, adjusting for individual characteristics, road traffic noise, and air pollution. RESULTS: Of 16,941 nurses, 745 developed breast cancer in total during 320,289 person-years of follow-up. We found no association between exposure to LAN and overall breast cancer. In the fully adjusted models, HRs for the highest (65.8-446.4 nW/cm(2)/sr) and medium (22.0-65.7 nW/cm(2)/sr) LAN tertiles were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.77, 1.23) and 1.09 (95% CI: 0.90, 1.31), respectively, compared to the lowest tertile of LAN exposure (0-21.9 nW/cm(2)/sr). We found a suggestive association between LAN and ER-breast cancer. CONCLUSION: This large cohort study of Danish female nurses suggests weak evidence of the association between LAN and breast cancer incidence.
Address Section of Environmental Health, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: younhee.lim@sund.ku.dk
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33345898 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3256
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