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Author Kanikowska, D.; Sugenoya, J.; Sato, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Inukai, Y.; Nishimura, N.; Iwase, S.
Title Seasonal variation in blood concentrations of interleukin-6, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, metabolites of catecholamine and cortisol in healthy volunteers Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal (up) Int J Biometeorol
Volume 53 Issue 6 Pages 479-485
Keywords Human Health; Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/*blood; Catecholamines/*blood; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Humans; Hydrocortisone/*blood; Interleukin-6/*blood; Male; Reference Values; *Seasons; Young Adult
Abstract We investigated seasonal changes in blood concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), metabolites of catecholamine (VMA, HVA, and 5-HIAA) and cortisol in humans. Eight volunteers were investigated at four times during the year (February, May, August and October) at latitude 35 degrees N. The mean ambient temperature at the collection periods was higher in the order of summer > autumn approximately spring > winter. Changes in mood were also monitored by a profile of mood states (POMS) questionnaire. The concentration of IL-6 was significantly higher in winter and summer than in spring and autumn. The concentrations of ACTH, HVA and VMA were significantly higher in summer. No seasonal variation was detected in cortisol. There were significant differences among the seasons in subscale tension and anger in the POMS questionnaire; the tension subscale showed significant differences between spring and autumn, with a higher score in spring. The results demonstrate that Il-6, ACTH, HVA and VMA exhibit statistically significant seasonal rhythms, which might have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.
Address Department of Physiology, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1195, Japan. dkanikowska@hotmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19506914 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 768
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Author Kujanik, S.; Mikulecky, M.
Title Circadian and ultradian extrasystole rhythms in healthy individuals at elevated versus lowland altitudes Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal (up) Int J Biometeorol
Volume 54 Issue 5 Pages 531-538
Keywords Human Health; Acclimatization/physiology; Aged; *Altitude; Anoxia/etiology; Cardiac Complexes, Premature/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Electrocardiography, Ambulatory; Heart Rate/*physiology; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Reference Values; Time Factors
Abstract We defined chronobiologic norms for supraventricular and ventricular single extrasystoles (SV and VE, respectively) in healthy older males in lowland areas. The study was extended to higher altitudes, where hypobaric hypoxia was expected to increase extrasystole frequency, while perhaps not changing rhythmicity. In healthy men (lowland n = 37, altitude n = 22), aged 49-72 years, mean numbers of SVs and VEs were counted over a 24-h period. Cosinor regression was used to test the 24-h rhythm and its 2nd-10th harmonics. The resulting approximating function for either extrasystole type includes its point, 95% confidence interval of the mean, and 95% tolerance for single measurement estimates. Separate hourly differences (delta) between altitude and lowland (n = 59) were also analysed. Hourly means were significantly higher in the mountains versus lowland, by +0.8 beats/h on average for SVs, and by +0.9 beats/h for VEs. A relatively rich chronogram for VEs in mountains versus lowland exists. Delta VEs clearly display a 24-h component and its 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 7th harmonics. This results in significantly higher accumulation of VEs around 8.00 a.m., 11.00 a.m. and 3.00 p.m. in the mountains. The increase in extrasystole occurrence in the mountains is probably caused by higher hypobaric hypoxia and resulting sympathetic drive. Healthy men at elevated altitudes show circadian and several ultradian rhythms of single VEs dependent on the hypoxia level. This new methodological approach--evaluating the differences between two locations using delta values--promises to provide deeper insight into the occurrence of premature beats.
Address Dept of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Trieda SNP 1, 040 66 Kosice, Slovak Republic. stefan.kujanik@upjs.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20195873 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 774
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Author Menegaux, F.; Truong, T.; Anger, A.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Lamkarkach, F.; Arveux, P.; Kerbrat, P.; Fevotte, J.; Guenel, P.
Title Night work and breast cancer: a population-based case-control study in France (the CECILE study) Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer Abbreviated Journal (up) Int J Cancer
Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 924-931
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm; Employment; Female; France/epidemiology; Humans; Middle Aged; Occupations; Pregnancy; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract Night work involving disruption of circadian rhythm was suggested as a possible cause of breast cancer. We examined the role of night work in a large population-based case-control study carried out in France between 2005 and 2008. Lifetime occupational history including work schedules of each night work period was elicited in 1,232 cases of breast cancer and 1,317 population controls. Thirteen percent of the cases and 11% of the controls had ever worked on night shifts (OR = 1.27 [95% confidence interval = 0.99-1.64]). Odds ratios were 1.35 [1.01-1.80] in women who worked on overnight shifts, 1.40 [1.01-1.92] in women who had worked at night for 4.5 or more years, and 1.43 [1.01-2.03] in those who worked less than three nights per week on average. The odds ratio was 1.95 [1.13-3.35] in women employed in night work for >4 years before their first full-term pregnancy, a period where mammary gland cells are incompletely differentiated and possibly more susceptible to circadian disruption effects. Our results support the hypothesis that night work plays a role in breast cancer, particularly in women who started working at night before first full-term pregnancy.
Address Inserm, CESP Center for research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Environmental Epidemiology of Cancer, Villejuif, France; Univ Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7136 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22689255 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 781
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Author Stevens, R.G.
Title Light-at-night, circadian disruption and breast cancer: assessment of existing evidence Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication International Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal (up) Int J Epidemiol
Volume 38 Issue 4 Pages 963-970
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Blindness/complications/epidemiology; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/metabolism; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/epidemiology/metabolism; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Light Signal Transduction/physiology; Lighting/adverse effects; Melatonin/biosynthesis; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence is increasing globally for largely unknown reasons. The possibility that a portion of the breast cancer burden might be explained by the introduction and increasing use of electricity to light the night was suggested >20 years ago. METHODS: The theory is based on nocturnal light-induced disruption of circadian rhythms, notably reduction of melatonin synthesis. It has formed the basis for a series of predictions including that non-day shift work would increase risk, blind women would be at lower risk, long sleep duration would lower risk and community nighttime light level would co-distribute with breast cancer incidence on the population level. RESULTS: Accumulation of epidemiological evidence has accelerated in recent years, reflected in an International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classification of shift work as a probable human carcinogen (2A). There is also a strong rodent model in support of the light-at-night (LAN) idea. CONCLUSION: If a consensus eventually emerges that LAN does increase risk, then the mechanisms for the effect are important to elucidate for intervention and mitigation. The basic understanding of phototransduction for the circadian system, and of the molecular genetics of circadian rhythm generation are both advancing rapidly, and will provide for the development of lighting technologies at home and at work that minimize circadian disruption, while maintaining visual efficiency and aesthetics. In the interim, there are strategies now available to reduce the potential for circadian disruption, which include extending the daily dark period, appreciate nocturnal awakening in the dark, using dim red light for nighttime necessities, and unless recommended by a physician, not taking melatonin tablets.
Address Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0300-5771 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19380369; PMCID:PMC2734067 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 527
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Author Bauer, S.E.; Wagner, S.E.; Burch, J.; Bayakly, R.; Vena, J.E.
Title A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal (up) Int J Health Geogr
Volume 12 Issue Pages 23
Keywords Human Health; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Georgia/epidemiology; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Registries; Risk Factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. METHODS: Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000-2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992-2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0-20 watts per sterradian cm(2)), medium (21-41 watts per sterradian cm(2)), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm(2)). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. RESULTS: Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15-50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.
Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. secbauer@ufl.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23594790; PMCID:PMC3651306 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 718
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