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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night and risk of depression in the elderly Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal J Affect Disord  
  Volume 151 Issue 1 Pages 331-336  
  Keywords Aged; Circadian Rhythm; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/*etiology; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/urine; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Risk Factors; Circadian rhythm; Daytime light; Depression; Elderly; Light at night; Melatonin; Mental Health  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Recent advances in understanding the fundamental links between chronobiology and depressive disorders have enabled exploring novel risk factors for depression in the field of biological rhythms. Increased exposure to light at night (LAN) is common in modern life, and LAN exposure is associated with circadian misalignment. However, whether LAN exposure in home settings is associated with depression remains unclear. METHODS: We measured the intensities of nighttime bedroom light and ambulatory daytime light along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion (UME) in 516 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale. RESULTS: The median nighttime light intensity was 0.8lx (interquartile range, 0.2-3.3). The depressed group (n=101) revealed significantly higher prevalence of LAN exposure (average intensity, >/= 5 lx) compared with that of the nondepressed group (n=415) using a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for daytime light exposure, insomnia, hypertension, sleep duration, and physical activity [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-3.25; P=0.02]. Consistently, another parameter of LAN exposure (duration of intensity >/= 10 lx, >/= 30 min) was significantly more prevalent in the depressed than in the nondepressed group (adjusted OR: 1.71; 95% CI, 1.01-2.89; P=0.046). In contrast, UME was not significantly associated with depressive symptoms. LIMITATION: Cross-sectional analysis. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that LAN exposure in home settings is significantly associated with depressive symptoms in the general elderly population. The risk of depression may be reduced by keeping nighttime bedroom dark.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23856285 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 165  
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Author Fritschi, L.; Erren, T.C.; Glass, D.C.; Girschik, J.; Thomson, A.K.; Saunders, C.; Boyle, T.; El-Zaemey, S.; Rogers, P.; Peters, S.; Slevin, T.; D'Orsogna, A.; de Vocht, F.; Vermeulen, R.; Heyworth, J.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The association between different night shiftwork factors and breast cancer: a case-control study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer  
  Volume 109 Issue 9 Pages 2472-2480  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Case-Control Studies; Female; Humans; Life Style; Middle Aged; Questionnaires; Risk; Risk Factors; Western Australia/epidemiology; *Work Schedule Tolerance; Young Adult; oncogenesis  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Research on the possible association between shiftwork and breast cancer is complicated because there are many different shiftwork factors, which might be involved including: light at night, phase shift, sleep disruption and changes in lifestyle factors while on shiftwork (diet, physical activity, alcohol intake and low sun exposure). METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study in Western Australia from 2009 to 2011 with 1205 incident breast cancer cases and 1789 frequency age-matched controls. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect demographic, reproductive, and lifestyle factors and lifetime occupational history and a telephone interview was used to obtain further details about the shiftwork factors listed above. RESULTS: A small increase in risk was suggested for those ever doing the graveyard shift (work between midnight and 0500 hours) and breast cancer (odds ratio (OR)=1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.97-1.39). For phase shift, we found a 22% increase in breast cancer risk (OR=1.22, 95% CI=1.01-1.47) with a statistically significant dose-response relationship (P=0.04). For the other shiftwork factors, risks were marginally elevated and not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: We found some evidence that some of the factors involved in shiftwork may be associated with breast cancer but the ORs were low and there were inconsistencies in duration and dose-response relationships.  
  Address Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24022188; PMCID:PMC3817316 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 153  
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Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.X.; Korkmaz, A.; Rosales-Corral, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin and stable circadian rhythms optimize maternal, placental and fetal physiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Human Reproduction Update Abbreviated Journal Hum Reprod Update  
  Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 293-307  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Antioxidants/physiology; Biological Clocks/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Fetus/*physiology; Humans; Mammals; Melatonin/biosynthesis/*physiology; Mice; Oxidative Stress/physiology; Parturition/physiology; Placenta/metabolism/*physiology; Pre-Eclampsia/etiology/metabolism; Pregnancy; Uterus/metabolism; circadian rhythms; fetus; melatonin; placenta; pre-eclampsia  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Research within the last decade has shown melatonin to have previously-unsuspected beneficial actions on the peripheral reproductive organs. Likewise, numerous investigations have documented that stable circadian rhythms are also helpful in maintaining reproductive health. The relationship of melatonin and circadian rhythmicity to maternal and fetal health is summarized in this review. METHODS: Databases were searched for the related published English literature up to 15 May 2013. The search terms used in various combinations included melatonin, circadian rhythms, biological clock, suprachiasmatic nucleus, ovary, pregnancy, uterus, placenta, fetus, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, ischemia-reperfusion, chronodisruption, antioxidants, oxidative stress and free radicals. The results of the studies uncovered are summarized herein. RESULTS: Both melatonin and circadian rhythms impact reproduction, especially during pregnancy. Melatonin is a multifaceted molecule with direct free radical scavenging and indirect antioxidant activities. Melatonin is produced in both the ovary and in the placenta where it protects against molecular mutilation and cellular dysfunction arising from oxidative/nitrosative stress. The placenta, in particular, is often a site of excessive free radical generation due to less than optimal adhesion to the uterine wall, which leads to either persistent hypoxia or intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation, processes that cause massive free radical generation and organ dysfunction. This may contribute to pre-eclampsia and other disorders which often complicate pregnancy. Melatonin has ameliorated free radical damage to the placenta and to the fetus in experiments using non-human mammals. Likewise, the maintenance of a regular maternal light/dark and sleep/wake cycle is important to stabilize circadian rhythms generated by the maternal central circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Optimal circadian rhythmicity in the mother is important since her circadian clock, either directly or indirectly via the melatonin rhythm, programs the developing master oscillator of the fetus. Experimental studies have shown that disturbed maternal circadian rhythms, referred to as chronodisruption, and perturbed melatonin cycles have negative consequences for the maturing fetal oscillators, which may lead to psychological and behavioral problems in the newborn. To optimize regular circadian rhythms and prevent disturbances of the melatonin cycle during pregnancy, shift work and bright light exposure at night should be avoided, especially during the last trimester of pregnancy. Finally, melatonin synergizes with oxytocin to promote delivery of the fetus. Since blood melatonin levels are normally highest during the dark period, the propensity of childbirth to occur at night may relate to the high levels of melatonin at this time which work in concert with oxytocin to enhance the strength of uterine contractions. CONCLUSIONS: A number of conclusions naturally evolve from the data summarized in this review: (i) melatonin, of both pineal and placental origin, has essential functions in fetal maturation and placenta/uterine homeostasis; (ii) circadian clock genes, which are components of all cells including those in the peripheral reproductive organs, have important roles in reproductive and organismal (fetal and maternal) physiology; (iii) due to the potent antioxidant actions of melatonin, coupled with its virtual absence of toxicity, this indoleamine may have utility in the treatment of pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, placental and fetal ischemia/reperfusion, etc. (iv) the propensity for parturition to occur at night may relate to the synergism between the nocturnal increase in melatonin and oxytocin.  
  Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1355-4786 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24132226 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 504  
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Author Summa, K.C.; Vitaterna, M.H.; Turek, F.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Environmental perturbation of the circadian clock disrupts pregnancy in the mouse Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 7 Issue 5 Pages e37668  
  Keywords Animals; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; *Environment; Female; Locomotion/physiology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Photoperiod; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Outcome; Reproduction/*physiology  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: The circadian clock has been linked to reproduction at many levels in mammals. Epidemiological studies of female shift workers have reported increased rates of reproductive abnormalities and adverse pregnancy outcomes, although whether the cause is circadian disruption or another factor associated with shift work is unknown. Here we test whether environmental disruption of circadian rhythms, using repeated shifts of the light:dark (LD) cycle, adversely affects reproductive success in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Young adult female C57BL/6J (B6) mice were paired with B6 males until copulation was verified by visual identification of vaginal plug formation. Females were then randomly assigned to one of three groups: control, phase-delay or phase-advance. Controls remained on a constant 12-hr light:12-hr dark cycle, whereas phase-delayed and phase-advanced mice were subjected to 6-hr delays or advances in the LD cycle every 5-6 days, respectively. The number of copulations resulting in term pregnancies was determined. Control females had a full-term pregnancy success rate of 90% (11/12), which fell to 50% (9/18; p<0.1) in the phase-delay group and 22% (4/18; p<0.01) in the phase-advance group. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Repeated shifting of the LD cycle, which disrupts endogenous circadian timekeeping, dramatically reduces pregnancy success in mice. Advances of the LD cycle have a greater negative impact on pregnancy outcomes and, in non-pregnant female mice, require longer for circadian re-entrainment, suggesting that the magnitude or duration of circadian misalignment may be related to the severity of the adverse impact on pregnancy. These results explicitly link disruptions of circadian entrainment to adverse pregnancy outcomes in mammals, which may have important implications for the reproductive health of female shift workers, women with circadian rhythm sleep disorders and/or women with disturbed circadian rhythms for other reasons.  
  Address Center for Sleep and Circadian Biology, Department of Neurobiology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, United States of America  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22649550; PMCID:PMC3359308 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 92  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Filipski, E.; Subramanian, P.; Carriere, J.; Guettier, C.; Barbason, H.; Levi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian disruption accelerates liver carcinogenesis in mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Mutation Research Abbreviated Journal Mutat Res  
  Volume 680 Issue 1-2 Pages 95-105  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Alanine Transaminase/blood; Animals; Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood; Bile Duct Neoplasms/chemically induced/pathology; Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic/drug effects/pathology; Body Weight/drug effects; Carcinogens/administration & dosage/*toxicity; Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/chemically induced/pathology; Cholangiocarcinoma/chemically induced/pathology; Circadian Rhythm/*drug effects; Diethylnitrosamine/administration & dosage/*toxicity; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Injections, Intraperitoneal; Liver/drug effects/pathology; Liver Neoplasms/blood/*chemically induced/pathology; Male; Mice; Neoplasms, Multiple Primary/chemically induced/pathology; Sarcoma/chemically induced/pathology; Time Factors  
  Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: The circadian timing system rhythmically controls behavior, physiology, cellular proliferation and xenobiotic metabolism over the 24-h period. The suprachiasmatic nuclei in the hypothalamus coordinate the molecular clocks in most mammalian cells through an array of circadian physiological rhythms including rest-activity, body temperature, feeding patterns and hormonal secretions. As a result, shift work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic in humans. In experimental models, chronic jet-lag (CJL) suppresses rest-activity and body temperature rhythms and accelerates growth of two transplantable tumors in mice. CJL also suppresses or significantly alters the expression rhythms of clock genes in liver and tumors. Circadian clock disruption from CJL downregulates p53 and upregulates c-Myc, thus favoring cellular proliferation. Here, we investigate the role of CJL as a tumor promoter in mice exposed to the hepatic carcinogen, diethylnitrosamine (DEN). METHODS: In experiment 1 (Exp 1), the dose-dependent carcinogenicity of chronic intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DEN was explored in mice. In Exp 2, mice received DEN at 10 mg/kg/day (cumulative dose: 243 mg/kg), then were randomized to remain in a photoperiodic regimen where 12 h of light alternates with 12 h of darkness (LD 12:12) or to be submitted to CJL (8-h advance of light onset every 2 days). Rest-activity and body temperature were monitored. Serum liver enzymes were determined repeatedly. Mice were sacrificed and examined for neoplastic lesions at 10 months. RESULTS: In Exp 1, DEN produced liver cancers in all the mice receiving 10 mg/kg/day. In Exp 2, mice on CJL had increased mean plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase and more liver tumors as compared to LD mice at approximately 10 months (p = 0.005 and 0.028, respectively). The mean diameter of the largest liver tumor was twice as large in CJL vs LD mice (8.5 vs 4.4 mm, p = 0.027). In LD, a single histologic tumor type per liver was observed. In CJL, up to four different types were associated in the same liver (hepatocellular- or cholangio-carcinomas, sarcomas or mixed tumors). DEN itself markedly disrupted the circadian rhythms in rest-activity and body temperature in all the mice. DEN-induced disruption was prolonged for >or= 3 months by CJL exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The association of circadian disruption with chronic DEN exposure suggests that circadian clocks actively control the mechanisms of liver carcinogenesis in mice. Persistent circadian coordination may further be critical for slowing down and/or reverting cancer development after carcinogen exposure.  
  Address INSERM, U776 Rythmes Biologiques et Cancers, Hopital Paul Brousse, Villejuif F-94807, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-5107 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19833225 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 747  
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