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Author Wilhelm, I.; Born, J.; Kudielka, B.M.; Schlotz, W.; Wust, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is the cortisol awakening rise a response to awakening? Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 358-366  
  Keywords Human Health; Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/blood; Adult; Arousal/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Hydrocortisone/blood/*metabolism; Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/physiology; Male; Pituitary-Adrenal System/physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/physiology  
  Abstract A distinct rise in cortisol levels that occurs after morning awakening is increasingly used as an indicator of adrenocortical activity which is associated with different pathologies. Although it was previously assumed that the transition from sleep to wake is essential for the occurrence of the cortisol morning rise, this has never been tested. Here, we examined 16 healthy young men (20-33 yrs) between 2300 and 0800 h under sleep laboratory conditions. Serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) as well as salivary cortisol levels (after subjects were woken up at 0700 h) were repeatedly assessed. In a supplementary study condition, salivary cortisol levels in the first hour after awakening were measured at the subjects' home on two consecutive days. Comparison of pre- and post awakening measurements revealed significantly steeper increases in cortisol and ACTH after awakening. The rise in cortisol upon awakening under laboratory conditions did not significantly differ from that observed at home. We conclude that the cortisol increase after awakening is a response to morning awakening that is distinct from the circadian rise in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in the morning hours. Although the cortisol awakening response is modulated by circadian influences, it primarily reflects phasic psychophysiological processes specific to the sleep-wake transition.  
  Address Department of Psychobiology, University of Trier, Johanniterufer 15, 54290 Trier, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (up) 0306-4530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17408865 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 834  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bennett, S.; Alpert, M.; Kubulins, V.; Hansler, R.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Use of modified spectacles and light bulbs to block blue light at night may prevent postpartum depression Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Med Hypotheses  
  Volume 73 Issue 2 Pages 251-253  
  Keywords Depression, Postpartum/*prevention & control; *Eyeglasses; Female; Humans; *Lighting; blue light; light therapy; blue blocker  
  Abstract In 2001 it was discovered that exposing the eyes to light in the blue end of the visible spectrum suppresses the production of the sleep hormone, melatonin. New mothers need to get up during the night to care for their babies. This is the time when melatonin is normally flowing. Exposing their eyes to light can cut off the flow. It may also reset their circadian (internal) clock. On subsequent nights the melatonin may not begin flowing at the normal time making it difficult to fall asleep. Over time, disruption of the circadian rhythm plus sleep deprivation may result in depression. Women suffering postpartum depression were enrolled in a small clinical trial. Some were provided with glasses and light bulbs that block blue light. Others were equipped with glasses and light bulbs that looked colored but did not block the rays causing melatonin suppression. Those with the “real glasses” recovered somewhat more quickly than those with the placebo glasses and light bulbs. The hypothesis that should be tested in large scale clinical trials is that the risk of postpartum depression can be reduced when a new mother avoids exposing her eyes to blue light when she gets up at night to care for her baby. In the meantime, all new mothers may benefit from using glasses and light bulbs that block blue light when getting up at night to care for their babies.  
  Address Postpartum Support, International P.O. Box 60931, Santa Barbara, CA 93160, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (up) 0306-9877 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19329259 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 296  
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Author Knutsson, A.; Alfredsson, L.; Karlsson, B.; Akerstedt, T.; Fransson, E.I.; Westerholm, P.; Westerlund, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Breast cancer among shift workers: results of the WOLF longitudinal cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health Abbreviated Journal Scand J Work Environ Health  
  Volume 39 Issue 2 Pages 170-177  
  Keywords Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; Incidence; Longitudinal Studies; Middle Aged; Proportional Hazards Models; Risk Assessment; Sweden/epidemiology; *Work Schedule Tolerance; oncogenesis  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether shift work (with or without night work) is associated with increased risk of breast cancer. METHODS: The population consisted of 4036 women. Data were obtained from WOLF (Work, Lipids, and Fibrinogen), a longitudinal cohort study. Information about baseline characteristics was based on questionnaire responses and medical examination. Cancer incidence from baseline to follow-up was obtained from the national cancer registry. Two exposure groups were identified: shift work with and without night work. The group with day work only was used as the reference group in the analysis. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate relative risk. RESULTS: In total, 94 women developed breast cancer during follow-up. The average follow-up time was 12.4 years. The hazard ratio for breast cancer was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.70-2.17] for shifts without night work and 2.02 (95% CI 1.03-3.95) for shifts with night work. When including only women <60 years of age, the risk estimates were 1.18 (95% CI 0.67-2.07) for shifts without night work, and 2.15 (95% CI 1.10-4.21) for shifts with night work. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate an increased risk for breast cancer among women who work shifts that includes night work.  
  Address Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall. Sweden. Anders.Knutsson@miun.se  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (up) 0355-3140 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23007867 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 154  
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Author Wright, K.P.J.; Hull, J.T.; Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Relationship between alertness, performance, and body temperature in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol  
  Volume 283 Issue 6 Pages R1370-7  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Attention/*physiology; *Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cognition/*physiology; Female; Humans; Male; Memory/physiology; Reaction Time; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; Wakefulness/physiology; NASA Discipline Regulatory Physiology; Non-NASA Center  
  Abstract Body temperature has been reported to influence human performance. Performance is reported to be better when body temperature is high/near its circadian peak and worse when body temperature is low/near its circadian minimum. We assessed whether this relationship between performance and body temperature reflects the regulation of both the internal biological timekeeping system and/or the influence of body temperature on performance independent of circadian phase. Fourteen subjects participated in a forced desynchrony protocol allowing assessment of the relationship between body temperature and performance while controlling for circadian phase and hours awake. Most neurobehavioral measures varied as a function of internal biological time and duration of wakefulness. A number of performance measures were better when body temperature was elevated, including working memory, subjective alertness, visual attention, and the slowest 10% of reaction times. These findings demonstrate that an increased body temperature, associated with and independent of internal biological time, is correlated with improved performance and alertness. These results support the hypothesis that body temperature modulates neurobehavioral function in humans.  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. kenneth.wright@colorado.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0363-6119 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12388468 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 835  
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Author Kamrowski, R.L.; Sutton, S.G.; Tobin, R.C.; Hamann, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Potential applicability of persuasive communication to light-glow reduction efforts: a case study of marine turtle conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal Environ Manage  
  Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages 583-595  
  Keywords Society; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Animals; *Conservation of Natural Resources; Culture; Female; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Middle Aged; Persuasive Communication; Public Opinion; Queensland; Questionnaires; *Turtles; Young Adult  
  Abstract Artificial lighting along coastlines poses a significant threat to marine turtles due to the importance of light for their natural orientation at the nesting beach. Effective lighting management requires widespread support and participation, yet engaging the public with light reduction initiatives is difficult because benefits associated with artificial lighting are deeply entrenched within modern society. We present a case study from Queensland, Australia, where an active light-glow reduction campaign has been in place since 2008 to protect nesting turtles. Semi-structured questionnaires explored community beliefs about reducing light and evaluated the potential for using persuasive communication techniques based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to increase engagement with light reduction. Respondents (n = 352) had moderate to strong intentions to reduce light. TPB variables explained a significant proportion of variance in intention (multiple regression: R (2) = 0.54-0.69, P < 0.001), but adding a personal norm variable improved the model (R (2) = 0.73-0.79, P < 0.001). Significant differences in belief strength between campaign compliers and non-compliers suggest that targeting the beliefs reducing light leads to “increased protection of local turtles” (P < 0.01) and/or “benefits to the local economy” (P < 0.05), in combination with an appeal to personal norms, would produce the strongest persuasion potential for future communications. Selective legislation and commitment strategies may be further useful strategies to increase community light reduction. As artificial light continues to gain attention as a pollutant, our methods and findings will be of interest to anyone needing to manage public artificial lighting.  
  Address School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, 4811, Australia, ruth.kamrowski(at)my.jcu.edu.au  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 0364-152X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24957580 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1283  
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