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Author Bennett, S.; Alpert, M.; Kubulins, V.; Hansler, R.L.
Title Use of modified spectacles and light bulbs to block blue light at night may prevent postpartum depression Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Med Hypotheses
Volume 73 Issue (up) 2 Pages 251-253
Keywords Depression, Postpartum/*prevention & control; *Eyeglasses; Female; Humans; *Lighting; blue light; light therapy; blue blocker
Abstract In 2001 it was discovered that exposing the eyes to light in the blue end of the visible spectrum suppresses the production of the sleep hormone, melatonin. New mothers need to get up during the night to care for their babies. This is the time when melatonin is normally flowing. Exposing their eyes to light can cut off the flow. It may also reset their circadian (internal) clock. On subsequent nights the melatonin may not begin flowing at the normal time making it difficult to fall asleep. Over time, disruption of the circadian rhythm plus sleep deprivation may result in depression. Women suffering postpartum depression were enrolled in a small clinical trial. Some were provided with glasses and light bulbs that block blue light. Others were equipped with glasses and light bulbs that looked colored but did not block the rays causing melatonin suppression. Those with the “real glasses” recovered somewhat more quickly than those with the placebo glasses and light bulbs. The hypothesis that should be tested in large scale clinical trials is that the risk of postpartum depression can be reduced when a new mother avoids exposing her eyes to blue light when she gets up at night to care for her baby. In the meantime, all new mothers may benefit from using glasses and light bulbs that block blue light when getting up at night to care for their babies.
Address Postpartum Support, International P.O. Box 60931, Santa Barbara, CA 93160, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19329259 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 296
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Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.X.; Korkmaz, A.; Rosales-Corral, S.A.
Title Melatonin and stable circadian rhythms optimize maternal, placental and fetal physiology Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Human Reproduction Update Abbreviated Journal Hum Reprod Update
Volume 20 Issue (up) 2 Pages 293-307
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Antioxidants/physiology; Biological Clocks/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Fetus/*physiology; Humans; Mammals; Melatonin/biosynthesis/*physiology; Mice; Oxidative Stress/physiology; Parturition/physiology; Placenta/metabolism/*physiology; Pre-Eclampsia/etiology/metabolism; Pregnancy; Uterus/metabolism; circadian rhythms; fetus; melatonin; placenta; pre-eclampsia
Abstract BACKGROUND: Research within the last decade has shown melatonin to have previously-unsuspected beneficial actions on the peripheral reproductive organs. Likewise, numerous investigations have documented that stable circadian rhythms are also helpful in maintaining reproductive health. The relationship of melatonin and circadian rhythmicity to maternal and fetal health is summarized in this review. METHODS: Databases were searched for the related published English literature up to 15 May 2013. The search terms used in various combinations included melatonin, circadian rhythms, biological clock, suprachiasmatic nucleus, ovary, pregnancy, uterus, placenta, fetus, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, ischemia-reperfusion, chronodisruption, antioxidants, oxidative stress and free radicals. The results of the studies uncovered are summarized herein. RESULTS: Both melatonin and circadian rhythms impact reproduction, especially during pregnancy. Melatonin is a multifaceted molecule with direct free radical scavenging and indirect antioxidant activities. Melatonin is produced in both the ovary and in the placenta where it protects against molecular mutilation and cellular dysfunction arising from oxidative/nitrosative stress. The placenta, in particular, is often a site of excessive free radical generation due to less than optimal adhesion to the uterine wall, which leads to either persistent hypoxia or intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation, processes that cause massive free radical generation and organ dysfunction. This may contribute to pre-eclampsia and other disorders which often complicate pregnancy. Melatonin has ameliorated free radical damage to the placenta and to the fetus in experiments using non-human mammals. Likewise, the maintenance of a regular maternal light/dark and sleep/wake cycle is important to stabilize circadian rhythms generated by the maternal central circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Optimal circadian rhythmicity in the mother is important since her circadian clock, either directly or indirectly via the melatonin rhythm, programs the developing master oscillator of the fetus. Experimental studies have shown that disturbed maternal circadian rhythms, referred to as chronodisruption, and perturbed melatonin cycles have negative consequences for the maturing fetal oscillators, which may lead to psychological and behavioral problems in the newborn. To optimize regular circadian rhythms and prevent disturbances of the melatonin cycle during pregnancy, shift work and bright light exposure at night should be avoided, especially during the last trimester of pregnancy. Finally, melatonin synergizes with oxytocin to promote delivery of the fetus. Since blood melatonin levels are normally highest during the dark period, the propensity of childbirth to occur at night may relate to the high levels of melatonin at this time which work in concert with oxytocin to enhance the strength of uterine contractions. CONCLUSIONS: A number of conclusions naturally evolve from the data summarized in this review: (i) melatonin, of both pineal and placental origin, has essential functions in fetal maturation and placenta/uterine homeostasis; (ii) circadian clock genes, which are components of all cells including those in the peripheral reproductive organs, have important roles in reproductive and organismal (fetal and maternal) physiology; (iii) due to the potent antioxidant actions of melatonin, coupled with its virtual absence of toxicity, this indoleamine may have utility in the treatment of pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, placental and fetal ischemia/reperfusion, etc. (iv) the propensity for parturition to occur at night may relate to the synergism between the nocturnal increase in melatonin and oxytocin.
Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1355-4786 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24132226 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 504
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Finy, M.S.; Walton, J.C.; Weil, Z.M.; Workman, J.L.; Ross, J.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Influence of light at night on murine anxiety- and depressive-like responses Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res
Volume 205 Issue (up) 2 Pages 349-354
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Anxiety/*physiopathology; Corticosterone/blood; Depression/*physiopathology; Dietary Sucrose/administration & dosage; Drinking Behavior/physiology; Light/*adverse effects; Lighting; Locomotion/physiology; Male; Maze Learning; Mice; Neuropsychological Tests; Organ Size; Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Random Allocation; Swimming; Testis/pathology
Abstract Individuals are increasingly exposed to light at night. Exposure to constant light (LL) disrupts circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature, hormones, and the sleep-wake cycle in animals. Other behavioural responses to LL have been reported, but are inconsistent. The present experiment sought to determine whether LL produces changes in affective responses and whether behavioural changes are mediated by alterations in glucocorticoid concentrations. Relative to conspecifics maintained in a light/dark cycle (LD, 16:8 light/dark), male Swiss-Webster mice exposed to LL for three weeks increased depressive-like behavioural responses as evaluated by the forced swim test and sucrose anhedonia. Furthermore, providing a light escape tube reversed the effects of LL in the forced swim test. LL mice displayed reduced anxiety as evaluated by the open field and elevated-plus maze. Glucocorticoid concentrations were reduced in the LL group suggesting that the affective behavioural responses to LL are not the result of elevated corticosterone. Additionally, mice housed in LD with a clear tube displayed increased paired testes mass as compared to LL mice. Taken together, these data provide evidence that exposure to unnatural lighting can induce significant changes in affect, increasing depressive-like and decreasing anxiety-like responses.
Address Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Fonken.1@osu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19591880 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 749
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Author Lerchl, A.; Schindler, C.; Eichhorn, K.; Kley, F.; Erren, T.C.
Title Indirect blue light does not suppress nocturnal salivary melatonin in humans in an automobile setting Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 47 Issue (up) 2 Pages 143-146
Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; *Automobiles; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Melatonin/metabolism/*secretion; Salivary Glands/*secretion; Statistics, Nonparametric
Abstract In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified shift work that involves circadian disruption as being probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A). In this context, light exposure during the night plays a key role because it can suppress nocturnal melatonin levels when exposures exceed a certain threshold. Blue light around 464 nm is most effective in suppressing melatonin because of the spectral sensitivity of melanopsin, a recently discovered photopigment in retinal ganglion cells; the axons of these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a circadian master clock in the brain. Due to advances in light technologies, normal tungsten light bulbs are being replaced by light-emitting diodes which produce quasi-monochromatic or white light. The objective of this study was to assess whether the light-melanopsin-melatonin axis might be affected in automobiles at night which employ the new generation diodes. To this end, we have tested in an experimental automobile setting whether indirect blue light (lambda(max) = 465 nm) at an intensity of 0.22 or 1.25 lx can suppress salivary melatonin levels in 12 male volunteers (age range 17-27 years) who served as their own controls. Daytime levels were low (2.7 +/- 0.5 pg/mL), and night-time levels without light exposure were high (14.5 +/- 1.1 pg/mL), as expected. Low-intensity light exposures had no significant effect on melatonin levels (0.22 lx: 17.2 +/- 2.8 pg/mL; P > 0.05; 1.25 lx: 12.6 +/- 2.0 pg/mL; P > 0.05). It is concluded that indirect blue light exposures in automobiles up to 1.25 lx do not cause unintentional chronodisruption via melatonin suppression.
Address School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University, D-28759 Bremen, Germany. a.lerchl@jacobs-university.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19555449 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 777
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Author Longcore, T.
Title Sensory ecology: night lights alter reproductive behavior of blue tits Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 20 Issue (up) 20 Pages R893-5
Keywords Animals; Austria; *Cities; Female; *Light; Male; Oviposition/*physiology; Passeriformes/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Vocalization, Animal/*physiology
Abstract Research on songbirds indicates that streetlights influence timing of dawn chorus, egg-laying and male success in siring extra-pair young, providing new evidence that artificial lighting is an ecologically disruptive force.
Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, CA 90024-0020, USA. longcore@urbanwildlands.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20971434 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 699
Permanent link to this record