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Author Abay, K.A.; Amare, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night light intensity and women's body weight: Evidence from Nigeria Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Economics and Human Biology Abbreviated Journal Econ Hum Biol  
  Volume 31 Issue (up) Pages 238-248  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Body Mass Index; *Body Weight; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Lighting/*statistics & numerical data; Middle Aged; Nigeria/epidemiology; Obesity/epidemiology; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prevalence; *Urbanization; Young Adult; *Bmi; *Nigeria; *Night light; *Obesity; *Overweight; *Urbanization  
  Abstract The prevalence of overweight and obesity are increasing in many African countries and hence becoming regional public health challenges. We employ satellite-based night light intensity data as a proxy for urbanization to investigate the relationship between urbanization and women's body weight. We use two rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey data from Nigeria. We employ both nonparametric and parametric estimation approaches that exploit both the cross-sectional and longitudinal variations in night light intensities. Our empirical analysis reveals nonlinear relationships between night light intensity and women's body weight measures. Doubling the sample's average level of night light intensity is associated with up to a ten percentage point increase in the probability of overweight. However, despite the generally positive relationship between night light intensity and women's body weight, the strength of the relationship varies across the assorted stages of night light intensity. Early stages of night light intensity are not significantly associated with women's body weight, while higher stages of nightlight intensities are associated with higher rates of overweight and obesity. Given that night lights are strong predictors of urbanization and related economic activities, our results hint at nonlinear relationships between various stages of urbanization and women's body weight.  
  Address International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA. Electronic address: M.Amare@cgiar.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1570-677X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30312904 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2714  
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Author Kloog, I.; Haim, A.; Stevens, R.G.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and cancers of prostate, colon, and lung in men Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 26 Issue (up) 1 Pages 108-125  
  Keywords Circadian Rhythm; Colonic Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Electricity; Humans; Incidence; *Light; Lung Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Urban Population; World Health; Oncogenesis  
  Abstract The incidence rates of cancers in men differ by countries of the world. We compared the incidence rates of three of the most common cancers (prostate, lung, and colon) in men residing in 164 different countries with the population-weighted light at night (LAN) exposure and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including per capita income, percent urban population, and electricity consumption. The estimate of per capita LAN exposure was a novel aspect of this study. Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and spatial error (SE) regression models were used in the analysis. We found a significant positive association between population exposure to LAN and incidence rates of prostate cancer, but no such association with lung cancer or colon cancer. The prostate cancer result is consistent with a biological theory and a limited number of previous studies of circadian disruption and risk. The LAN-prostate cancer connection is postulated to be due to suppression of melatonin and/or disruption of clock gene function. An analysis holding other variables at average values across the 164 countries yielded a risk of prostate cancer in the highest LAN-exposed countries 110% higher than in the lowest LAN exposed countries. This observed association is a necessary condition for a potentially large effect of LAN on risk of prostate cancer. However, it is not sufficient due to potential confounding by factors that increase the risk of prostate cancer and are also associated with LAN among the studied countries.  
  Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19142761 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 163  
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night and risk of depression in the elderly Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal J Affect Disord  
  Volume 151 Issue (up) 1 Pages 331-336  
  Keywords Aged; Circadian Rhythm; Cross-Sectional Studies; Depression/*etiology; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Melatonin/urine; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Risk Factors; Circadian rhythm; Daytime light; Depression; Elderly; Light at night; Melatonin; Mental Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Recent advances in understanding the fundamental links between chronobiology and depressive disorders have enabled exploring novel risk factors for depression in the field of biological rhythms. Increased exposure to light at night (LAN) is common in modern life, and LAN exposure is associated with circadian misalignment. However, whether LAN exposure in home settings is associated with depression remains unclear. METHODS: We measured the intensities of nighttime bedroom light and ambulatory daytime light along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion (UME) in 516 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale. RESULTS: The median nighttime light intensity was 0.8lx (interquartile range, 0.2-3.3). The depressed group (n=101) revealed significantly higher prevalence of LAN exposure (average intensity, >/= 5 lx) compared with that of the nondepressed group (n=415) using a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for daytime light exposure, insomnia, hypertension, sleep duration, and physical activity [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-3.25; P=0.02]. Consistently, another parameter of LAN exposure (duration of intensity >/= 10 lx, >/= 30 min) was significantly more prevalent in the depressed than in the nondepressed group (adjusted OR: 1.71; 95% CI, 1.01-2.89; P=0.046). In contrast, UME was not significantly associated with depressive symptoms. LIMITATION: Cross-sectional analysis. CONCLUSION: These results suggested that LAN exposure in home settings is significantly associated with depressive symptoms in the general elderly population. The risk of depression may be reduced by keeping nighttime bedroom dark.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Nara, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23856285 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 165  
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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Iwamoto, J.; Okamoto, N.; Tomioka, K.; Nezu, S.; Ikada, Y.; Kurumatani, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to light at night, nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion, and obesity/dyslipidemia in the elderly: a cross-sectional analysis of the HEIJO-KYO study Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 98 Issue (up) 1 Pages 337-344  
  Keywords *Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Case-Control Studies; *Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cross-Sectional Studies; Dyslipidemias/complications/metabolism/*urine; Female; Humans; Japan; *Light; Male; Melatonin/secretion/*urine; Obesity/complications/metabolism/*urine; Photoperiod  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Obesity and exposure to light at night (LAN) have increased globally. Although LAN suppresses melatonin secretion and disturbs body mass regulation in experimental settings, its associations with melatonin secretion, obesity, and other metabolic consequences in uncontrolled home settings remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the association of exposure to LAN in an uncontrolled home setting with melatonin secretion, obesity, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 528 elderly individuals (mean age, 72.8 yr). MEASURES: The intensity of LAN in the bedroom was measured at 1-min intervals during two consecutive nights, along with overnight urinary melatonin excretion and metabolic parameters. RESULTS: Compared with the Dim group (average <3 lux; n = 383), the LAN group (average >/=3 lux; n = 145) showed significantly higher body weight (adjusted mean, 58.8 vs. 56.6 kg; P = 0.01), body mass index (23.3 vs. 22.7 kg/m(2); P = 0.04), waist circumference (84.9 vs. 82.8 cm; P = 0.01), triglyceride levels (119.7 vs. 99.5 mg/dl; P < 0.01), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (128.6 vs. 122.2 mg/dl; P = 0.04), and showed significantly lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (57.4 vs. 61.3 mg/dl; P = 0.02). These associations were independent of numerous potential confounders, including urinary melatonin excretion. Furthermore, LAN exposure is associated with higher odds ratios (ORs) for obesity (body mass index: OR, 1.89; P = 0.02; abdominal: OR, 1.62; P = 0.04) and dyslipidemia (OR, 1.72; P = 0.02) independent of demographic and socioeconomic parameters. In contrast, urinary melatonin excretion and glucose parameters did not show significant differences between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to LAN in an uncontrolled home setting is associated with impaired obese and lipid parameters independent of nocturnal urinary melatonin excretion in elderly individuals. Moreover, LAN exposure is associated with higher ORs for obesity and dyslipidemia independent of demographic and socioeconomic parameters.  
  Address Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 840 Shijocho, Kashiharashi, Nara, 634-8521, Japan. obayashi@naramed-u.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23118419 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 168  
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Author Chellappa, S.L.; Steiner, R.; Blattner, P.; Oelhafen, P.; Gotz, T.; Cajochen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Non-visual effects of light on melatonin, alertness and cognitive performance: can blue-enriched light keep us alert? Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One  
  Volume 6 Issue (up) 1 Pages e16429  
  Keywords Circadian Rhythm/radiation effects; Cognition/*radiation effects; Color; Cross-Over Studies; Fluorescence; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/*radiation effects; Reaction Time/*radiation effects; Young Adult; blue light  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Light exposure can cascade numerous effects on the human circadian process via the non-imaging forming system, whose spectral relevance is highest in the short-wavelength range. Here we investigated if commercially available compact fluorescent lamps with different colour temperatures can impact on alertness and cognitive performance. METHODS: Sixteen healthy young men were studied in a balanced cross-over design with light exposure of 3 different light settings (compact fluorescent lamps with light of 40 lux at 6500K and at 2500K and incandescent lamps of 40 lux at 3000K) during 2 h in the evening. RESULTS: Exposure to light at 6500K induced greater melatonin suppression, together with enhanced subjective alertness, well-being and visual comfort. With respect to cognitive performance, light at 6500K led to significantly faster reaction times in tasks associated with sustained attention (Psychomotor Vigilance and GO/NOGO Task), but not in tasks associated with executive function (Paced Visual Serial Addition Task). This cognitive improvement was strongly related with attenuated salivary melatonin levels, particularly for the light condition at 6500K. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the sensitivity of the human alerting and cognitive response to polychromatic light at levels as low as 40 lux, is blue-shifted relative to the three-cone visual photopic system. Thus, the selection of commercially available compact fluorescent lights with different colour temperatures significantly impacts on circadian physiology and cognitive performance at home and in the workplace.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21298068; PMCID:PMC3027693 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 286  
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