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Author Longcore, T.
Title Sensory ecology: night lights alter reproductive behavior of blue tits Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 20 Issue 20 Pages R893-5
Keywords Animals; Austria; *Cities; Female; *Light; Male; Oviposition/*physiology; Passeriformes/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Vocalization, Animal/*physiology
Abstract Research on songbirds indicates that streetlights influence timing of dawn chorus, egg-laying and male success in siring extra-pair young, providing new evidence that artificial lighting is an ecologically disruptive force.
Address The Urban Wildlands Group, Los Angeles, CA 90024-0020, USA. longcore@urbanwildlands.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:20971434 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 699
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Author Orbach, D.N.; Fenton, B.
Title Vision impairs the abilities of bats to avoid colliding with stationary obstacles Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 5 Issue 11 Pages e13912
Keywords Analysis of Variance; Animals; Chiroptera/*physiology; Cyclonic Storms; Echolocation/*physiology; Female; Flight, Animal/*physiology; Light; Male; Space Perception/physiology/radiation effects; Vision, Ocular/*physiology/radiation effects; Vocalization, Animal/physiology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Free-flying insectivorous bats occasionally collide with stationary objects they should easily detect by echolocation and avoid. Collisions often occur with lighted objects, suggesting ambient light may deleteriously affect obstacle avoidance capabilities. We tested the hypothesis that free-flying bats may orient by vision when they collide with some obstacles. We additionally tested whether acoustic distractions, such as “distress calls” of other bats, contributed to probabilities of collision. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the role of visual cues in the collisions of free-flying little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) with stationary objects, we set up obstacles in an area of high bat traffic during swarming. We used combinations of light intensities and visually dissimilar obstacles to verify that bats orient by vision. In early August, bats collided more often in the light than the dark, and probabilities of collision varied with the visibility of obstacles. However, the probabilities of collisions altered in mid to late August, coincident with the start of behavioural, hormonal, and physiological changes occurring during swarming and mating. Distress calls did not distract bats and increase the incidence of collisions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that visual cues are more important for free-flying bats than previously recognized, suggesting integration of multi-sensory modalities during orientation. Furthermore, our study highlights differences between responses of captive and wild bats, indicating a need for more field experiments.
Address Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. dnorbach@gmail.com
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:21085481; PMCID:PMC2976695 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 96
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Author Spivey, A.
Title Light at night and breast cancer risk worldwide Type
Year 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect
Volume 118 Issue 12 Pages a525
Keywords Human Health; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Female; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Risk Factors
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:21123149; PMCID:PMC3002207 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 813
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Author Kloog, I.; Portnov, B.A.; Rennert, H.S.; Haim, A.
Title Does the modern urbanized sleeping habitat pose a breast cancer risk? Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 76-80
Keywords Human Health; ged; Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sleep; Urbanization
Abstract Due to its disruptive effects on circadian rhythms and sleep deprivation at night, shiftworking is currently recognized as a risk factor for breast cancer (BC). As revealed by the present analysis based on a comparative case-control study of 1679 women, exposure to light-at-night (LAN) in the “sleeping habitat” is significantly associated with BC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.118-1.311; p < .001), controlling for education, ethnicity, fertility, and alcohol consumption. The novelty of the present research is that, to the best of the authors' knowledge, it is the first study to have identified an unequivocal positive association between bedroom-light intensity and BC risk. Thus, according to the results of the present study, not only should artificial light exposure in the working environment be considered as a potential risk factor for BC, but also LAN in the “sleeping habitat.”
Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Graduate School of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:21182407 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 770
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Author Gooley, J.J.; Chamberlain, K.; Smith, K.A.; Khalsa, S.B.S.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Van Reen, E.; Zeitzer, J.M.; Czeisler, C.A.; Lockley, S.W.
Title Exposure to room light before bedtime suppresses melatonin onset and shortens melatonin duration in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab
Volume 96 Issue 3 Pages E463-72
Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Female; Humans; *Light; *Lighting; Male; Melatonin/*blood; Sleep/physiology; Time Factors; Young Adult
Abstract CONTEXT: Millions of individuals habitually expose themselves to room light in the hours before bedtime, yet the effects of this behavior on melatonin signaling are not well recognized. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that exposure to room light in the late evening suppresses the onset of melatonin synthesis and shortens the duration of melatonin production. DESIGN: In a retrospective analysis, we compared daily melatonin profiles in individuals living in room light (<200 lux) vs. dim light (<3 lux). PATIENTS: Healthy volunteers (n = 116, 18-30 yr) were recruited from the general population to participate in one of two studies. SETTING: Participants lived in a General Clinical Research Center for at least five consecutive days. INTERVENTION: Individuals were exposed to room light or dim light in the 8 h preceding bedtime. OUTCOME MEASURES: Melatonin duration, onset and offset, suppression, and phase angle of entrainment were determined. RESULTS: Compared with dim light, exposure to room light before bedtime suppressed melatonin, resulting in a later melatonin onset in 99.0% of individuals and shortening melatonin duration by about 90 min. Also, exposure to room light during the usual hours of sleep suppressed melatonin by greater than 50% in most (85%) trials. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that room light exerts a profound suppressive effect on melatonin levels and shortens the body's internal representation of night duration. Hence, chronically exposing oneself to electrical lighting in the late evening disrupts melatonin signaling and could therefore potentially impact sleep, thermoregulation, blood pressure, and glucose homeostasis.
Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. gmsjjg@nus.edu
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes (up) PMID:21193540; PMCID:PMC3047226 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 139
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