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Author Lerchl, A.; Schindler, C.; Eichhorn, K.; Kley, F.; Erren, T.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Indirect blue light does not suppress nocturnal salivary melatonin in humans in an automobile setting Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication (down) Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 47 Issue 2 Pages 143-146  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; *Automobiles; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Melatonin/metabolism/*secretion; Salivary Glands/*secretion; Statistics, Nonparametric  
  Abstract In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified shift work that involves circadian disruption as being probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A). In this context, light exposure during the night plays a key role because it can suppress nocturnal melatonin levels when exposures exceed a certain threshold. Blue light around 464 nm is most effective in suppressing melatonin because of the spectral sensitivity of melanopsin, a recently discovered photopigment in retinal ganglion cells; the axons of these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a circadian master clock in the brain. Due to advances in light technologies, normal tungsten light bulbs are being replaced by light-emitting diodes which produce quasi-monochromatic or white light. The objective of this study was to assess whether the light-melanopsin-melatonin axis might be affected in automobiles at night which employ the new generation diodes. To this end, we have tested in an experimental automobile setting whether indirect blue light (lambda(max) = 465 nm) at an intensity of 0.22 or 1.25 lx can suppress salivary melatonin levels in 12 male volunteers (age range 17-27 years) who served as their own controls. Daytime levels were low (2.7 +/- 0.5 pg/mL), and night-time levels without light exposure were high (14.5 +/- 1.1 pg/mL), as expected. Low-intensity light exposures had no significant effect on melatonin levels (0.22 lx: 17.2 +/- 2.8 pg/mL; P > 0.05; 1.25 lx: 12.6 +/- 2.0 pg/mL; P > 0.05). It is concluded that indirect blue light exposures in automobiles up to 1.25 lx do not cause unintentional chronodisruption via melatonin suppression.  
  Address School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University, D-28759 Bremen, Germany. a.lerchl@jacobs-university.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19555449 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 777  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Santhi, N.; Thorne, H.C.; van der Veen, D.R.; Johnsen, S.; Mills, S.L.; Hommes, V.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Archer, S.N.; Dijk, D.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The spectral composition of evening light and individual differences in the suppression of melatonin and delay of sleep in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication (down) Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 53 Issue 1 Pages 47-59  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; *Circadian Clocks; Cross-Sectional Studies; Electroencephalography; Female; Humans; Male; Melatonin/*metabolism; Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Rod Opsins/*metabolism; *Sleep; *Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/etiology/metabolism/physiopathology; Time Factors  
  Abstract The effect of light on circadian rhythms and sleep is mediated by a multi-component photoreceptive system of rods, cones and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. The intensity and spectral sensitivity characteristics of this system are to be fully determined. Whether the intensity and spectral composition of light exposure at home in the evening is such that it delays circadian rhythms and sleep also remains to be established. We monitored light exposure at home during 6-8wk and assessed light effects on sleep and circadian rhythms in the laboratory. Twenty-two women and men (23.1+/-4.7yr) participated in a six-way, cross-over design using polychromatic light conditions relevant to the light exposure at home, but with reduced, intermediate or enhanced efficacy with respect to the photopic and melanopsin systems. The evening rise of melatonin, sleepiness and EEG-assessed sleep onset varied significantly (P<0.01) across the light conditions, and these effects appeared to be largely mediated by the melanopsin, rather than the photopic system. Moreover, there were individual differences in the sensitivity to the disruptive effect of light on melatonin, which were robust against experimental manipulations (intra-class correlation=0.44). The data show that light at home in the evening affects circadian physiology and imply that the spectral composition of artificial light can be modified to minimize this disruptive effect on sleep and circadian rhythms. These findings have implications for our understanding of the contribution of artificial light exposure to sleep and circadian rhythm disorders such as delayed sleep phase disorder.  
  Address Surrey Sleep Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK. n.santhi@surrey.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22017511 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 802  
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Author Schoech, S.J.; Bowman, R.; Hahn, T.P.; Goymann, W.; Schwabl, I.; Bridge, E.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of low levels of light at night upon the endocrine physiology of western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (down) Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological Genetics and Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol  
  Volume 319 Issue 9 Pages 527-538  
  Keywords Animals; Corticosterone/blood; Ecosystem; Female; *Light; Male; Melatonin/blood; Passeriformes/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Reproduction/*physiology; Testosterone/blood  
  Abstract Florida scrub-jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in the suburbs breed earlier than jays in native habitat. Amongst the possible factors that influence this advance (e.g., food availability, microclimate, predator regime, etc.), is exposure to artificial lights at night (LAN). LAN could stimulate the reproductive axis of the suburban jays. Alternatively, LAN could inhibit pineal melatonin (MEL), thus removing its inhibitory influence on the reproductive axis. Because Florida scrub-jays are a threatened species, we used western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) to investigate the effects of LAN upon reproductive hormones and melatonin. Jays were held under conditions in which the dark-phase of the light:dark cycle was without illumination and then under low levels of LAN. Under both conditions, birds were exposed first to short-days (9.5L:14.5D) that were gradually increased to long-days (14.5L:9.5D). At various times, blood samples were collected during the light part of the cycle to measure reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone, LH; testosterone, T; and estradiol, E2 ). Similarly, samples to assess melatonin were collected during the dark. In males, LAN caused a depression in LH levels and levels were approximately 4x greater under long- than short-days. In females, there was no effect of LAN or photoperiod upon LH. LAN resulted in depressed T levels in females, although there was no effect on T in males. E2 levels in both sexes were lower under LAN than under an unlighted dark-phase. Paradoxically, MEL was higher in jays under LAN, and under long-days. MEL did not differ by sex. LAN disrupted the extraordinarily strong correlation between T and E2 that existed under unlighted nocturnal conditions. Overall, our findings fail to support the hypothesis that LAN stimulates the reproductive axis. Rather, the data demonstrate that LAN tends to inhibit reproductive hormone secretion, although not in a consistent fashion between the sexes.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1932-5223 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23970442 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 37  
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Author Landers, J.A.; Tamblyn, D.; Perriam, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of a blue-light-blocking intraocular lens on the quality of sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication (down) Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery Abbreviated Journal J Cataract Refract Surg  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 83-88  
  Keywords Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Female; Humans; *Lens Implantation, Intraocular; *Lenses, Intraocular; Light; Male; *Phacoemulsification; Prosthesis Design; Questionnaires; Sleep/*physiology; blue light; sleep  
  Abstract PURPOSE: To evaluate whether implantation of a blue-light-blocking intraocular lens (IOL) affects sleep quality. SETTING: Repatriation General Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. METHODS: This study comprised patients who had bilateral cataract surgery during the preceding 12 months with implantation of a conventional SI40NB IOL or an AcrySof Natural SN60WF blue-light-blocking IOL. Patients were contacted by telephone at least 6 months after second-eye surgery, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire was administered. Results were compared between groups. RESULTS: Of the 49 patients, 31 received conventional IOLs and 18, blue-light-blocking IOLs. The mean age of the patients was 80 years +/- 8.1 (SD). The median PSQI score was 6 (interquartile range 3 to 8). There were no statistically significant differences in PSQI scores between the 2 IOL groups (P = .65). This remained true after adjustment for sex, age, medication, and time since surgery. CONCLUSION: The blue-light-blocking IOL had no effect on the sleep quality of patients, indicating that these IOLs might serve as an alternative to conventional IOLs without a detrimental effect on circadian rhythm.  
  Address Department of Ophthalmology, Repatriation General Hospital, Adelaide, Australia. john.landers@bigpond.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0886-3350 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19101429 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 288  
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Aubrecht, T.G.; Melendez-Fernandez, O.H.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night disrupts molecular circadian rhythms and increases body weight Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication (down) Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 262-271  
  Keywords Animals; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Body Weight/*physiology; CLOCK Proteins/biosynthesis/genetics; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Corticosterone/metabolism; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Immunohistochemistry; Light; *Lighting; Male; Mice; Motor Activity; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/metabolism/physiology; clock genes; feeding rhythm; light pollution; obesity  
  Abstract With the exception of high latitudes, life has evolved under bright days and dark nights. Most organisms have developed endogenously driven circadian rhythms that are synchronized to this daily light/dark cycle. In recent years, humans have shifted away from the naturally occurring solar light cycle in favor of artificial and sometimes irregular light schedules produced by electric lighting. Exposure to unnatural light cycles is increasingly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, the means by which environmental lighting alters metabolism are poorly understood. Thus, we exposed mice to dim light at night and investigated changes in the circadian system and metabolism. Here we report that exposure to ecologically relevant levels of dim (5 lux) light at night altered core circadian clock rhythms in the hypothalamus at both the gene and protein level. Circadian rhythms in clock expression persisted during light at night; however, the amplitude of Per1 and Per2 rhythms was attenuated in the hypothalamus. Circadian oscillations were also altered in peripheral tissues critical for metabolic regulation. Exposure to dimly illuminated, as compared to dark, nights decreased the rhythmic expression in all but one of the core circadian clock genes assessed in the liver. Additionally, mice exposed to dim light at night attenuated Rev-Erb expression in the liver and adipose tissue. Changes in the circadian clock were associated with temporal alterations in feeding behavior and increased weight gain. These results are significant because they provide evidence that mild changes in environmental lighting can alter circadian and metabolic function. Detailed analysis of temporal changes induced by nighttime light exposure may provide insight into the onset and progression of obesity and metabolic syndrome, as well as other disorders involving sleep and circadian rhythm disruption.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience and Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23929553; PMCID:PMC4033305 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 28  
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