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Author Spivey, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Light at night and breast cancer risk worldwide Type
  Year 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 118 Issue 12 Pages a525  
  Keywords Human Health; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Female; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Risk Factors  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21123149; PMCID:PMC3002207 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 813  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wilhelm, I.; Born, J.; Kudielka, B.M.; Schlotz, W.; Wust, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Is the cortisol awakening rise a response to awakening? Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 358-366  
  Keywords Human Health; Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/blood; Adult; Arousal/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Hydrocortisone/blood/*metabolism; Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/physiology; Male; Pituitary-Adrenal System/physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/physiology  
  Abstract A distinct rise in cortisol levels that occurs after morning awakening is increasingly used as an indicator of adrenocortical activity which is associated with different pathologies. Although it was previously assumed that the transition from sleep to wake is essential for the occurrence of the cortisol morning rise, this has never been tested. Here, we examined 16 healthy young men (20-33 yrs) between 2300 and 0800 h under sleep laboratory conditions. Serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) as well as salivary cortisol levels (after subjects were woken up at 0700 h) were repeatedly assessed. In a supplementary study condition, salivary cortisol levels in the first hour after awakening were measured at the subjects' home on two consecutive days. Comparison of pre- and post awakening measurements revealed significantly steeper increases in cortisol and ACTH after awakening. The rise in cortisol upon awakening under laboratory conditions did not significantly differ from that observed at home. We conclude that the cortisol increase after awakening is a response to morning awakening that is distinct from the circadian rise in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in the morning hours. Although the cortisol awakening response is modulated by circadian influences, it primarily reflects phasic psychophysiological processes specific to the sleep-wake transition.  
  Address Department of Psychobiology, University of Trier, Johanniterufer 15, 54290 Trier, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17408865 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 834  
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Author Bhatti, P.; Mirick, D.K.; Davis, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Invited commentary: Shift work and cancer Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol  
  Volume 176 Issue 9 Pages 760-3; discussion 764-5  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Male; *Men's Health; Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Occupations/*statistics & numerical data; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*statistics & numerical data  
  Abstract In this issue of the Journal, Parent et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(9):751-759) report significant associations between night-shift work and risk of cancer at several sites among men. These findings not only address the need for shift-work studies that evaluate cancers other than breast and prostate cancer but also support the increasing concern that the negative effects of shift work may be broadly applicable to risk of many cancers via the direct oncostatic properties of melatonin. Studies of shift work have been limited by a lack of detailed data for determining which aspects of this multifaceted exposure may be associated with increased cancer risk. Additionally, the influence of individual-level characteristics, such as preference for daytime activity versus nighttime activity or chronotype, has not been considered. In moving forward, launching new cohort studies of shift work and cancer risk is the most tenable approach, though it will be limited by the years of follow-up required in order to accrue adequate numbers of cancer cases. Studies incorporating biomarkers of effect are useful for providing immediate information that can aid not only in identifying the underlying mechanisms of the shift-work-cancer association but also in interpreting existing epidemiologic data and informing the design of future epidemiologic studies of cancer risk.  
  Address Program in Epidemiology, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. pbhatti@fhcrc.org  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23035018 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 507  
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Finy, M.S.; Walton, J.C.; Weil, Z.M.; Workman, J.L.; Ross, J.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Influence of light at night on murine anxiety- and depressive-like responses Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 205 Issue 2 Pages 349-354  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Anxiety/*physiopathology; Corticosterone/blood; Depression/*physiopathology; Dietary Sucrose/administration & dosage; Drinking Behavior/physiology; Light/*adverse effects; Lighting; Locomotion/physiology; Male; Maze Learning; Mice; Neuropsychological Tests; Organ Size; Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Random Allocation; Swimming; Testis/pathology  
  Abstract Individuals are increasingly exposed to light at night. Exposure to constant light (LL) disrupts circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature, hormones, and the sleep-wake cycle in animals. Other behavioural responses to LL have been reported, but are inconsistent. The present experiment sought to determine whether LL produces changes in affective responses and whether behavioural changes are mediated by alterations in glucocorticoid concentrations. Relative to conspecifics maintained in a light/dark cycle (LD, 16:8 light/dark), male Swiss-Webster mice exposed to LL for three weeks increased depressive-like behavioural responses as evaluated by the forced swim test and sucrose anhedonia. Furthermore, providing a light escape tube reversed the effects of LL in the forced swim test. LL mice displayed reduced anxiety as evaluated by the open field and elevated-plus maze. Glucocorticoid concentrations were reduced in the LL group suggesting that the affective behavioural responses to LL are not the result of elevated corticosterone. Additionally, mice housed in LD with a clear tube displayed increased paired testes mass as compared to LL mice. Taken together, these data provide evidence that exposure to unnatural lighting can induce significant changes in affect, increasing depressive-like and decreasing anxiety-like responses.  
  Address Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19591880 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 749  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lerchl, A.; Schindler, C.; Eichhorn, K.; Kley, F.; Erren, T.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (down) Indirect blue light does not suppress nocturnal salivary melatonin in humans in an automobile setting Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 47 Issue 2 Pages 143-146  
  Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; *Automobiles; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Humans; *Lighting; Male; Melatonin/metabolism/*secretion; Salivary Glands/*secretion; Statistics, Nonparametric  
  Abstract In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified shift work that involves circadian disruption as being probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A). In this context, light exposure during the night plays a key role because it can suppress nocturnal melatonin levels when exposures exceed a certain threshold. Blue light around 464 nm is most effective in suppressing melatonin because of the spectral sensitivity of melanopsin, a recently discovered photopigment in retinal ganglion cells; the axons of these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a circadian master clock in the brain. Due to advances in light technologies, normal tungsten light bulbs are being replaced by light-emitting diodes which produce quasi-monochromatic or white light. The objective of this study was to assess whether the light-melanopsin-melatonin axis might be affected in automobiles at night which employ the new generation diodes. To this end, we have tested in an experimental automobile setting whether indirect blue light (lambda(max) = 465 nm) at an intensity of 0.22 or 1.25 lx can suppress salivary melatonin levels in 12 male volunteers (age range 17-27 years) who served as their own controls. Daytime levels were low (2.7 +/- 0.5 pg/mL), and night-time levels without light exposure were high (14.5 +/- 1.1 pg/mL), as expected. Low-intensity light exposures had no significant effect on melatonin levels (0.22 lx: 17.2 +/- 2.8 pg/mL; P > 0.05; 1.25 lx: 12.6 +/- 2.0 pg/mL; P > 0.05). It is concluded that indirect blue light exposures in automobiles up to 1.25 lx do not cause unintentional chronodisruption via melatonin suppression.  
  Address School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University, D-28759 Bremen, Germany. a.lerchl@jacobs-university.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19555449 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 777  
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