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Author Stevens, R.G.
Title (up) Artificial lighting in the industrialized world: circadian disruption and breast cancer Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 501-507
Keywords Human Health; Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Chronobiology Disorders/*etiology/physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm; Developing Countries; Female; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Melatonin/metabolism; Risk Factors; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiopathology
Abstract Breast cancer risk is high in industrialized societies, and increases as developing countries become more Westernized. The reasons are poorly understood. One possibility is circadian disruption from aspects of modern life, in particular the increasing use of electric power to light the night, and provide a sun-free environment during the day inside buildings. Circadian disruption could lead to alterations in melatonin production and in changing the molecular time of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). There is evidence in humans that the endogenous melatonin rhythm is stronger for persons in a bright-day environment than in a dim-day environment; and the light intensity necessary to suppress melatonin at night continues to decline as new experiments are done. Melatonin suppression can increase breast tumorigenesis in experimental animals, and altering the endogenous clock mechanism may have downstream effects on cell cycle regulatory genes pertinent to breast tissue development and susceptibility. Therefore, maintenance of a solar day-aligned circadian rhythm in endogenous melatonin and in clock gene expression by exposure to a bright day and a dark night, may be a worthy goal. However, exogenous administration of melatonin in an attempt to achieve this goal may have an untoward effect given that pharmacologic dosing with melatonin has been shown to phase shift humans depending on the time of day it's given. Exogenous melatonin may therefore contribute to circadian disruption rather than alleviate it.
Address University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030-6325, USA. bugs@neuron.uchc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16596303 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 818
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Author Kempenaers, B.; Borgstrom, P.; Loes, P.; Schlicht, E.; Valcu, M.
Title (up) Artificial night lighting affects dawn song, extra-pair siring success, and lay date in songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 20 Issue 19 Pages 1735-1739
Keywords Animals; Environmental Pollution; Female; Light; *Lighting; Male; *Reproduction; Sexual Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Songbirds/*physiology; Time Factors; *Vocalization, Animal
Abstract Associated with a continued global increase in urbanization, anthropogenic light pollution is an important problem. However, our understanding of the ecological consequences of light pollution is limited. We investigated effects of artificial night lighting on dawn song in five common forest-breeding songbirds. In four species, males near street lights started singing significantly earlier at dawn than males elsewhere in the forest, and this effect was stronger in naturally earlier-singing species. We compared reproductive behavior of blue tits breeding in edge territories with and without street lights to that of blue tits breeding in central territories over a 7 year period. Under the influence of street lights, females started egg laying on average 1.5 days earlier. Males occupying edge territories with street lights were twice as successful in obtaining extra-pair mates than their close neighbors or than males occupying central forest territories. Artificial night lighting affected both age classes but had a stronger effect on yearling males. Our findings indicate that light pollution has substantial effects on the timing of reproductive behavior and on individual mating patterns. It may have important evolutionary consequences by changing the information embedded in previously reliable quality-indicator traits.
Address Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard-Gwinner-Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany. b.kempenaers@orn.mpg.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20850324 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 51
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Author Lowden, A.; Akerstedt, T.
Title (up) Assessment of a new dynamic light regimen in a nuclear power control room without windows on quickly rotating shiftworkers--effects on health, wakefulness, and circadian alignment: a pilot study Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 641-649
Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; Darkness/adverse effects; *Environment, Controlled; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Middle Aged; Photic Stimulation; Pilot Projects; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/*physiology; *Wakefulness; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract The aim of the study was to test whether a new dynamic light regime would improve alertness, sleep, and adaptation to rotating shiftwork. The illumination level in a control room without windows at a nuclear power station was ~200 lux (straight-forward horizontal gaze) using a weak yellow light of 200 lux, 3000 K (Philips Master TLD 36 W 830). New lighting equipment was installed in one area of the control room above the positions of the reactor operators. The new lights were shielded from the control group by a distance of >6 m, and the other operators worked at desks turned away from the new light. The new lights were designed to give three different light exposures: (i) white/blue strong light of 745 lux, 6000 K; (ii) weak yellow light of 650 lux, 4000 K; and (iii) yellow moderate light of 700 lux, 4000 K. In a crossover design, the normal and new light exposures were given during a sequence of three night shifts, two free days, two morning shifts, and one afternoon shift (NNN + MMA), with 7 wks between sessions. The operators consisted of two groups; seven reactor operators from seven work teams were at one time exposed to the new equipment and 16 other operators were used as controls. The study was conducted during winter with reduced opportunities of daylight exposure during work, after night work, or before morning work. Operators wore actigraphs, filled in a sleep/wake diary, including ratings of sleepiness on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) every 2 h, and provided saliva samples for analysis of melatonin at work (every 2nd h during one night shift and first 3 h during one morning shift). Results from the wake/sleep diary showed the new light treatment increased alertness during the 2nd night shift (interaction group x light x time, p < .01). Time of waking was delayed in the light condition after the 3rd night shift (group x light, p < .05), but the amount of wake time during the sleep span increased after the 2nd night shift (p < .05), also showing a tendency to affect sleep efficiency (p < .10). Effects on circadian phase were difficult to establish given the small sample size and infrequent sampling of saliva melatonin. Nonetheless, it seems that appropriate dynamic light in rooms without windows during the dark Nordic season may promote alertness, sleep, and better adaptation to quickly rotating shiftwork.
Address Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. arne.lowden@stress.su.se
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22621361 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 148
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Author Nadis, S.
Title (up) Biologists join drive to turn down the lights Type
Year 2002 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume 419 Issue 6910 Pages 868
Keywords Ecology; Animal Migration; Animals; Astronomical Phenomena; Astronomy; Biology/*trends; Breast Neoplasms/etiology; Environment; Environmental Pollution/*adverse effects/prevention & control; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Risk Factors; Vision, Ocular/physiology
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Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:12410271 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 787
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Author Kayumov, L.; Casper, R.F.; Hawa, R.J.; Perelman, B.; Chung, S.A.; Sokalsky, S.; Shapiro, C.M.
Title (up) Blocking low-wavelength light prevents nocturnal melatonin suppression with no adverse effect on performance during simulated shift work Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab
Volume 90 Issue 5 Pages 2755-2761
Keywords Lighting; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/*secretion; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract Decreases in melatonin production in human and animals are known to be caused by environmental lighting, especially short-wavelength lighting (between 470 and 525 nm). We investigated the novel hypothesis that the use of goggles with selective exclusion of all wavelengths less than 530 nm could prevent the suppression of melatonin in bright-light conditions during a simulated shift-work experiment. Salivary melatonin levels were measured under dim (<5 lux), bright (800 lux), and filtered (800 lux) light at hourly intervals between 2000 and 0800 h in 11 healthy young males and eight females (mean age, 24.7 +/- 4.6 yr). The measurements were performed during three nonconsecutive nights over a 2-wk period. Subjective sleepiness was measured by self-report scales, whereas objective performance was assessed with the Continuous Performance Test. All subjects demonstrated preserved melatonin levels in filtered light similar to their dim-light secretion profile. Unfiltered bright light drastically suppressed melatonin production. Normalization of endogenous melatonin production while wearing goggles did not impair measures of performance, subjective sleepiness, or alertness.
Address Sleep Research Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, ECW 3D-035, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5T 2S8. lkayumov@uhnres.utoronto.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15713707 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 640
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