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Author Oike, H.; Sakurai, M.; Ippoushi, K.; Kobori, M.
Title Time-fixed feeding prevents obesity induced by chronic advances of light/dark cycles in mouse models of jet-lag/shift work Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications Abbreviated Journal Biochem Biophys Res Commun
Volume (down) 465 Issue 3 Pages 556-561
Keywords Animals; *Circadian Clocks; *Disease Models, Animal; *Feeding Behavior; Jet Lag Syndrome/*physiopathology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Obesity/etiology/*physiopathology/*prevention & control; Photoperiod; Circadian rhythm; Clock genes; Jet lag; Metabolic disorders; Obesity; Shift work
Abstract Recent findings have uncovered intimate relationships between circadian clocks and energy metabolism. Epidemiological studies have shown that the frequency of obesity and metabolic disorders increases among shift-workers. Here we found that a chronic shift in light/dark (LD) cycles comprising an advance of six hours twice weekly, induced obesity in mice. Under such conditions that imitate jet lag/shift work, body weight and glucose intolerance increased, more fat accumulated in white adipose tissues and the expression profiles of metabolic genes changed in the liver compared with normal LD conditions. Mice fed at a fixed 12 h under the LD shift notably did not develop symptoms of obesity despite isocaloric intake. These results suggest that jet lag/shift work induces obesity as a result of fluctuating feeding times and it can be prevented by fixing meal times. This rodent model of obesity might serve as a useful tool for understanding why shift work induces metabolic disorders.
Address Food Function Division, National Food Research Institute, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NARO), 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642, Japan; oike(at)affrc.go.jp
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-291X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26297949 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1318
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Author Nadis, S.
Title Biologists join drive to turn down the lights Type
Year 2002 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume (down) 419 Issue 6910 Pages 868
Keywords Ecology; Animal Migration; Animals; Astronomical Phenomena; Astronomy; Biology/*trends; Breast Neoplasms/etiology; Environment; Environmental Pollution/*adverse effects/prevention & control; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Risk Factors; Vision, Ocular/physiology
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:12410271 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 787
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Author Boivin, D.B.; Duffy, J.F.; Kronauer, R.E.; Czeisler, C.A.
Title Dose-response relationships for resetting of human circadian clock by light Type Journal Article
Year 1996 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature
Volume (down) 379 Issue 6565 Pages 540-542
Keywords Human Health; Adult; Body Temperature; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Humans; *Light; Male; NASA Discipline Number 18-10; NASA Discipline Regulatory Physiology; NASA Program Space Physiology and Countermeasures; Non-NASA Center
Abstract Since the first report in unicells, studies across diverse species have demonstrated that light is a powerful synchronizer which resets, in an intensity-dependent manner, endogenous circadian pacemakers. Although it is recognized that bright light (approximately 7,000 to 13,000 lux) is an effective circadian synchronizer in humans, it is widely believed that the human circadian pacemaker is insensitive to ordinary indoor illumination (approximately 50-300 lux). It has been proposed that the relationship between the resetting effect of light and its intensity follows a compressive nonlinear function, such that exposure to lower illuminances still exerts a robust effect. We therefore undertook a series of experiments which support this hypothesis and report here that light of even relatively low intensity (approximately 180 lux) significantly phase-shifts the human circadian pacemaker. Our results clearly demonstrate that humans are much more sensitive to light than initially suspected and support the conclusion that they are not qualitatively different from other mammals in their mechanism of circadian entrainment.
Address Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:8596632 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 722
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Author Czeisler, C.A.; Shanahan, T.L.; Klerman, E.B.; Martens, H.; Brotman, D.J.; Emens, J.S.; Klein, T.; Rizzo, J.F. 3rd
Title Suppression of melatonin secretion in some blind patients by exposure to bright light Type Journal Article
Year 1995 Publication The New England Journal of Medicine Abbreviated Journal N Engl J Med
Volume (down) 332 Issue 1 Pages 6-11
Keywords Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Blindness/etiology/*physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/blood/*secretion; Middle Aged; Photic Stimulation; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/physiopathology; Visual Perception
Abstract BACKGROUND: Complete blindness generally results in the loss of synchronization of circadian rhythms to the 24-hour day and in recurrent insomnia. However, some blind patients maintain circadian entrainment. We undertook this study to determine whether some blind patients' eyes convey sufficient photic information to entrain the hypothalamic circadian pacemaker and suppress melatonin secretion, despite an apparently complete loss of visual function. METHODS: We evaluated the input of light to the circadian pacemaker by testing the ability of bright light to decrease plasma melatonin concentrations in 11 blind patients with no conscious perception of light and in 6 normal subjects. We also evaluated circadian entrainment over time in the blind patients. RESULTS: Plasma melatonin concentrations decreased during exposure to bright light in three sightless patients by an average (+/- SD) of 69 +/- 21 percent and in the normal subjects by an average of 66 +/- 15 percent. When two of these blind patients were tested with their eyes covered during exposure to light, plasma melatonin did not decrease. The three blind patients reported no difficulty sleeping and maintained apparent circadian entrainment to the 24-hour day. Plasma melatonin concentrations did not decrease during exposure to bright light in seven of the remaining blind patients; in the eighth, plasma melatonin was undetectable. These eight patients reported a history of insomnia, and in four the circadian temperature rhythm was not entrained to the 24-hour day. CONCLUSIONS: The visual subsystem that mediates light-induced suppression of melatonin secretion remains functionally intact in some sightless patients. The absence of photic input to the circadian system thus constitutes a distinct form of blindness, associated with periodic insomnia, that afflicts most but not all patients with no conscious perception of light.
Address Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0028-4793 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:7990870 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 732
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Author Schoech, S.J.; Bowman, R.; Hahn, T.P.; Goymann, W.; Schwabl, I.; Bridge, E.S.
Title The effects of low levels of light at night upon the endocrine physiology of western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological Genetics and Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Genet Physiol
Volume (down) 319 Issue 9 Pages 527-538
Keywords Animals; Corticosterone/blood; Ecosystem; Female; *Light; Male; Melatonin/blood; Passeriformes/*physiology; *Photoperiod; Reproduction/*physiology; Testosterone/blood
Abstract Florida scrub-jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) in the suburbs breed earlier than jays in native habitat. Amongst the possible factors that influence this advance (e.g., food availability, microclimate, predator regime, etc.), is exposure to artificial lights at night (LAN). LAN could stimulate the reproductive axis of the suburban jays. Alternatively, LAN could inhibit pineal melatonin (MEL), thus removing its inhibitory influence on the reproductive axis. Because Florida scrub-jays are a threatened species, we used western scrub-jays (Aphelocoma californica) to investigate the effects of LAN upon reproductive hormones and melatonin. Jays were held under conditions in which the dark-phase of the light:dark cycle was without illumination and then under low levels of LAN. Under both conditions, birds were exposed first to short-days (9.5L:14.5D) that were gradually increased to long-days (14.5L:9.5D). At various times, blood samples were collected during the light part of the cycle to measure reproductive hormones (luteinizing hormone, LH; testosterone, T; and estradiol, E2 ). Similarly, samples to assess melatonin were collected during the dark. In males, LAN caused a depression in LH levels and levels were approximately 4x greater under long- than short-days. In females, there was no effect of LAN or photoperiod upon LH. LAN resulted in depressed T levels in females, although there was no effect on T in males. E2 levels in both sexes were lower under LAN than under an unlighted dark-phase. Paradoxically, MEL was higher in jays under LAN, and under long-days. MEL did not differ by sex. LAN disrupted the extraordinarily strong correlation between T and E2 that existed under unlighted nocturnal conditions. Overall, our findings fail to support the hypothesis that LAN stimulates the reproductive axis. Rather, the data demonstrate that LAN tends to inhibit reproductive hormone secretion, although not in a consistent fashion between the sexes.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-5223 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23970442 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 37
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