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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Bierman, A.; Plitnick, B.; Rea, M.S.
Title Preliminary evidence that both blue and red light can induce alertness at night Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication BMC Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal BMC Neurosci
Volume (up) 10 Issue Pages 105
Keywords Adult; Alpha Rhythm; Analysis of Variance; Beta Rhythm; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cornea/physiology; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Electrocardiography; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/secretion; Middle Aged; *Photic Stimulation; Psychomotor Performance; Radioimmunoassay; Salivary Glands/secretion; Wakefulness/*physiology; physiology of vision; blue light; red light
Abstract BACKGROUND: A variety of studies have demonstrated that retinal light exposure can increase alertness at night. It is now well accepted that the circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light and is quite insensitive to long-wavelength (red) light. Retinal exposures to blue light at night have been recently shown to impact alertness, implicating participation by the circadian system. The present experiment was conducted to look at the impact of both blue and red light at two different levels on nocturnal alertness. Visually effective but moderate levels of red light are ineffective for stimulating the circadian system. If it were shown that a moderate level of red light impacts alertness, it would have had to occur via a pathway other than through the circadian system. METHODS: Fourteen subjects participated in a within-subject two-night study, where each participant was exposed to four experimental lighting conditions. Each night each subject was presented a high (40 lx at the cornea) and a low (10 lx at the cornea) diffuse light exposure condition of the same spectrum (blue, lambda(max) = 470 nm, or red, lambda(max) = 630 nm). The presentation order of the light levels was counterbalanced across sessions for a given subject; light spectra were counterbalanced across subjects within sessions. Prior to each lighting condition, subjects remained in the dark (< 1 lx at the cornea) for 60 minutes. Electroencephalogram (EEG) measurements, electrocardiogram (ECG), psychomotor vigilance tests (PVT), self-reports of sleepiness, and saliva samples for melatonin assays were collected at the end of each dark and light periods. RESULTS: Exposures to red and to blue light resulted in increased beta and reduced alpha power relative to preceding dark conditions. Exposures to high, but not low, levels of red and of blue light significantly increased heart rate relative to the dark condition. Performance and sleepiness ratings were not strongly affected by the lighting conditions. Only the higher level of blue light resulted in a reduction in melatonin levels relative to the other lighting conditions. CONCLUSION: These results support previous findings that alertness may be mediated by the circadian system, but it does not seem to be the only light-sensitive pathway that can affect alertness at night.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. figuem@rpi.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2202 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19712442; PMCID:PMC2744917 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 285
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Author Smith, M.R.; Revell, V.L.; Eastman, C.I.
Title Phase advancing the human circadian clock with blue-enriched polychromatic light Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume (up) 10 Issue 3 Pages 287-294
Keywords Adult; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Lighting/*methods; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Phototherapy/*methods; Sleep; Wakefulness; Young Adult; blue light; sleep
Abstract BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light. Whether this sensitivity can be utilized to increase the size of phase shifts using light boxes and protocols designed for practical settings is not known. We assessed whether bright polychromatic lamps enriched in the short-wavelength portion of the visible light spectrum could produce larger phase advances than standard bright white lamps. METHODS: Twenty-two healthy young adults received either a bright white or bright blue-enriched 2-h phase advancing light pulse upon awakening on each of four treatment days. On the first treatment day the light pulse began 8h after the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), on average about 2h before baseline wake time. On each subsequent day, light treatment began 1h earlier than the previous day, and the sleep schedule was also advanced. RESULTS: Phase advances of the DLMO for the blue-enriched (92+/-78 min, n=12) and white groups (76+/-45 min, n=10) were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: Bright blue-enriched polychromatic light is no more effective than standard bright light therapy for phase advancing circadian rhythms at commonly used therapeutic light levels.
Address Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Rush University Medical Center, Suite 425, 1645 W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18805055; PMCID:PMC2723863 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 289
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Author Sharkey, K.M.; Carskadon, M.A.; Figueiro, M.G.; Zhu, Y.; Rea, M.S.
Title Effects of an advanced sleep schedule and morning short wavelength light exposure on circadian phase in young adults with late sleep schedules Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Sleep Medicine Abbreviated Journal Sleep Med
Volume (up) 12 Issue 7 Pages 685-692
Keywords Affect/physiology/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology/*radiation effects; Color; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Photoperiod; Phototherapy/*methods; Saliva/metabolism; Sleep/physiology/radiation effects; Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm/prevention & control/*therapy; Stress, Psychological/prevention & control/therapy; Treatment Outcome; Young Adult; blue light
Abstract OBJECTIVE: We examined the effects of an advanced sleep/wake schedule and morning short wavelength (blue) light in 25 adults (mean age+/-SD=21.8+/-3 years; 13 women) with late sleep schedules and subclinical features of delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). METHODS: After a baseline week, participants kept individualized, fixed, advanced 7.5-h sleep schedules for 6days. Participants were randomly assigned to groups to receive “blue” (470nm, approximately 225lux, n=12) or “dim” (<1lux, n=13) light for 1h after waking each day. Head-worn “Daysimeters” measured light exposure; actigraphs and sleep diaries confirmed schedule compliance. Salivary dim light melatonin onset (DLMO), self-reported sleep, and mood were examined with 2x2 ANOVA. RESULTS: After 6days, both groups showed significant circadian phase advances, but morning blue light was not associated with larger phase shifts than dim-light exposure. The average DLMO advances (mean+/-SD) were 1.5+/-1.1h in the dim light group and 1.4+/-0.7h in the blue light group. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to a fixed advanced sleep/wake schedule resulted in significant circadian phase shifts in young adults with subclinical DSPD with or without morning blue light exposure. Light/dark exposures associated with fixed early sleep schedules are sufficient to advance circadian phase in young adults.
Address Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Box G-RIH, Providence, RI 02912, USA. katherine_sharkey@brown.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1389-9457 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21704557; PMCID:PMC3145013 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 303
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Author Bauer, S.E.; Wagner, S.E.; Burch, J.; Bayakly, R.; Vena, J.E.
Title A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal Int J Health Geogr
Volume (up) 12 Issue Pages 23
Keywords Human Health; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Georgia/epidemiology; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Registries; Risk Factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. METHODS: Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000-2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992-2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0-20 watts per sterradian cm(2)), medium (21-41 watts per sterradian cm(2)), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm(2)). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. RESULTS: Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15-50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.
Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. secbauer@ufl.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23594790; PMCID:PMC3651306 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 718
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Author Bullough, J.D.; Rea, M.S.; Figueiro, M.G.
Title Of mice and women: light as a circadian stimulus in breast cancer research Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume (up) 17 Issue 4 Pages 375-383
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*physiopathology; *Circadian Rhythm; *Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; *Light; Light Signal Transduction; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal/*physiopathology; Melatonin/metabolism; Mice; Muridae/metabolism
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Nocturnal rodents are frequently used as models in human breast cancer research, but these species have very different visual and circadian systems and, therefore, very different responses to optical radiation or, informally, light. Because of the impact of light on the circadian system and because recent evidence suggests that cancer risk might be related to circadian disruption, it is becoming increasingly clear that optical radiation must be properly characterized for both nocturnal rodents and diurnal humans to make significant progress in unraveling links between circadian disruption and breast cancer. In this paper, we propose a quantitative framework for comparing radiometric and photometric quantities in human and rodent studies. METHODS: We reviewed published research on light as a circadian stimulus for humans and rodents. Both suppression of nocturnal melatonin and phase shifting were examined as outcome measures for the circadian system. RESULTS: The data were used to develop quantitative comparisons regarding the absolute and spectral sensitivity for the circadian systems of humans and nocturnal rodents. CONCLUSIONS: Two models of circadian phototransduction, for mouse and humans, have been published providing spectral sensitivities for these two species. Despite some methodological variations among the studies reviewed, the circadian systems of nocturnal rodents are approximately 10,000 times more sensitive to optical radiation than that of humans. Circadian effectiveness of different sources for both humans and nocturnal rodents are offered together with a scale relating their absolute sensitivities. Instruments calibrated in terms of conventional photometric units (e.g., lux) will not accurately characterize the circadian stimulus for either humans or rodents.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 21 Union Street, Troy, NY 12180, USA. bulloj@rpi.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16596289 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 726
Permanent link to this record