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Author Taillard, J.; Capelli, A.; Sagaspe, P.; Anund, A.; Akerstedt, T.; Philip, P.
Title In-car nocturnal blue light exposure improves motorway driving: a randomized controlled trial Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2012 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 7 Issue 10 Pages e46750
Keywords Adult; *Automobile Driving; Caffeine/pharmacology; Coffee/chemistry; Cross-Over Studies; Double-Blind Method; Fatigue/*prevention & control; Humans; Light; Male; Middle Aged; *Photic Stimulation; Placebos; Psychomotor Performance/drug effects/radiation effects; Reproducibility of Results; Sleep Deprivation; Sleep Stages/radiation effects; Wakefulness/drug effects/physiology/*radiation effects; blue light
Abstract Prolonged wakefulness greatly decreases nocturnal driving performance. The development of in-car countermeasures is a future challenge to prevent sleep-related accidents. The aim of this study is to determine whether continuous exposure to monochromatic light in the short wavelengths (blue light), placed on the dashboard, improves night-time driving performance. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 48 healthy male participants (aged 20-50 years) drove 400 km (250 miles) on motorway during night-time. They randomly and consecutively received either continuous blue light exposure (GOLite, Philips, 468 nm) during driving or 2*200 mg of caffeine or placebo of caffeine before and during the break. Treatments were separated by at least 1 week. The outcomes were number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) and mean standard deviation of the lateral position (SDLP). Eight participants (17%) complained about dazzle during blue light exposure and were removed from the analysis. Results from the 40 remaining participants (mean age +/- SD: 32.9+/-11.1) showed that countermeasures reduced the number of inappropriate line crossings (ILC) (F(2,91.11) = 6.64; p<0.05). Indeed, ILC were lower with coffee (12.51 [95% CI, 5.86 to 19.66], p = 0.001) and blue light (14.58 [CI, 8.75 to 22.58], p = 0.003) than with placebo (26.42 [CI, 19.90 to 33.71]). Similar results were found for SDLP. Treatments did not modify the quality, quantity and timing of 3 subsequent nocturnal sleep episodes. Despite a lesser tolerance, a non-inferior efficacy of continuous nocturnal blue light exposure compared with caffeine suggests that this in-car countermeasure, used occasionally, could be used to fight nocturnal sleepiness at the wheel in blue light-tolerant drivers, whatever their age. More studies are needed to determine the reproducibility of data and to verify if it can be generalized to women. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01070004.
Address University of Bordeaux, Sommeil, Attention et Neuropsychiatrie, USR 3413, Bordeaux, France. jack.taillard@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23094031; PMCID:PMC3477137 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 347
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Author Bhatti, P.; Mirick, D.K.; Davis, S.
Title Invited commentary: Shift work and cancer Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2012 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal Am J Epidemiol
Volume 176 Issue 9 Pages 760-3; discussion 764-5
Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Male; *Men's Health; Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Occupations/*statistics & numerical data; Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/*statistics & numerical data
Abstract In this issue of the Journal, Parent et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(9):751-759) report significant associations between night-shift work and risk of cancer at several sites among men. These findings not only address the need for shift-work studies that evaluate cancers other than breast and prostate cancer but also support the increasing concern that the negative effects of shift work may be broadly applicable to risk of many cancers via the direct oncostatic properties of melatonin. Studies of shift work have been limited by a lack of detailed data for determining which aspects of this multifaceted exposure may be associated with increased cancer risk. Additionally, the influence of individual-level characteristics, such as preference for daytime activity versus nighttime activity or chronotype, has not been considered. In moving forward, launching new cohort studies of shift work and cancer risk is the most tenable approach, though it will be limited by the years of follow-up required in order to accrue adequate numbers of cancer cases. Studies incorporating biomarkers of effect are useful for providing immediate information that can aid not only in identifying the underlying mechanisms of the shift-work-cancer association but also in interpreting existing epidemiologic data and informing the design of future epidemiologic studies of cancer risk.
Address Program in Epidemiology, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. pbhatti@fhcrc.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:23035018 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 507
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Author Boivin, D.B.; Boudreau, P.; Tremblay, G.M.
Title Phototherapy and orange-tinted goggles for night-shift adaptation of police officers on patrol Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 629-640
Keywords Human Health; Adaptation, Physiological/*physiology; Adult; Attention/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Color; Darkness; *Eye Protective Devices/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Light; Male; Melatonin/analogs & derivatives/metabolism/urine; Phototherapy/*adverse effects; *Police; Psychomotor Performance/*physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/physiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology
Abstract The aim of the present combined field and laboratory study was to assess circadian entrainment in two groups of police officers working seven consecutive 8/8.5-h night shifts as part of a rotating schedule. Eight full-time police officers on patrol (mean age +/- SD: 29.8 +/- 6.5 yrs) were provided an intervention consisting of intermittent exposure to wide-spectrum bright light at night, orange-tinted goggles at sunrise, and maintenance of a regular sleep/darkness episode in the day. Orange-tinted goggles have been shown to block the melatonin-suppressing effect of light significantly more than neutral gray density goggles. Nine control group police officers (mean age +/- SD: 30.3 +/- 4.1 yrs) working the same schedule were enrolled. Police officers were studied before, after (in the laboratory), and during (ambulatory) a series of seven consecutive nights. Urine samples were collected at wake time and bedtime throughout the week of night work and during laboratory visits (1 x /3 h) preceding and following the work week to measure urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (UaMT6s) excretion rate. Subjective alertness was assessed at the start, middle, and end of night shifts. A 10-min psychomotor vigilance task was performed at the start and end of each shift. Both laboratory visits consisted of two 8-h sleep episodes based on the prior schedule. Saliva samples were collected 2 x /h during waking episodes to assay their melatonin content. Subjective alertness (3 x /h) and performance (1 x /2 h) were assessed during wake periods in the laboratory. A mixed linear model was used to analyze the progression of UaMt6s excreted during daytime sleep episodes at home, as well as psychomotor performance and subjective alertness during night shifts. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (factors: laboratory visit and group) were used to compare peak salivary melatonin and UaMT6s excretion rate in the laboratory. In both groups of police officers, the excretion rate of UaMT6s at home was higher during daytime sleep episodes at the end compared to the start of the work week (p < .001). This rate increased significantly more in the intervention than control group (p = .032). A significant phase delay of salivary melatonin was observed in both groups at the end of study (p = .009), although no significant between-group difference was reached. Reaction speed dropped, and subjective alertness decreased throughout the night shift in both groups (p < .001). Reaction speed decreased throughout the work week in the control group (p </= .021), whereas no difference was observed in the intervention group. Median reaction time was increased as of the 5th and 6th nights compared to the 2nd night in controls (p </= .003), whereas it remained stable in the intervention group. These observations indicate better physiological adaptation in the intervention group compared to the controls.
Address Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms , Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. diane.boivin@douglas.mcgill.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22621360 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 509
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Author Dickerman, B.; Liu, J.
Title Does current scientific evidence support a link between light at night and breast cancer among female night-shift nurses? Review of evidence and implications for occupational and environmental health nurses Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2012 Publication Workplace Health & Safety Abbreviated Journal Workplace Health Saf
Volume 60 Issue 6 Pages 273-81; quiz 282
Keywords Human Health; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/nursing; Chronobiology Disorders/*epidemiology/nursing; Education, Nursing, Continuing; Environmental Health; Evidence-Based Nursing; Female; Humans; Light; Night Care/*statistics & numerical data; *Occupational Health Nursing; Risk Factors; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract Breast cancer is increasingly prevalent in industrialized regions of the world, and exposure to light at night (LAN) has been proposed as a potential risk factor. Epidemiological observations have documented an increased breast cancer risk among female night-shift workers, and strong experimental evidence for this relationship has also been found in rodent models. Indirect support for the LAN hypothesis comes from studies involving blind women, sleep duration, bedroom light levels, and community nighttime light levels. This article reviews the literature, discusses possible mechanisms of action, and provides recommendations for occupational health nursing research, practice, and education. Research is needed to further explore the relationship between exposure to LAN and breast cancer risk and elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship before interventions can be designed for prevention and mitigation of breast cancer.
Address MultiCare Good Samaritan Hospital, Puyallup, WA, USA. barbra.dickerman@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2165-0799 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22658734 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 512
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Author Sigurdardottir, L.G.; Valdimarsdottir, U.A.; Fall, K.; Rider, J.R.; Lockley, S.W.; Schernhammer, E.; Mucci, L.A.
Title Circadian disruption, sleep loss, and prostate cancer risk: a systematic review of epidemiologic studies Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2012 Publication Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology Abbreviated Journal Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
Volume 21 Issue 7 Pages 1002-1011
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Humans; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/*epidemiology/*etiology; Risk Factors; *Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm; *Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract Disruption of the circadian system has been hypothesized to increase cancer risk, either because of direct disruption of the molecular machinery generating circadian rhythms or because of disruption of parameters controlled by the clock such as melatonin levels or sleep duration. This hypothesis has been studied in hormone-dependent cancers among women, but data are sparse about potential effects of circadian disruption on the risk of prostate cancer. This review systematically examines available data evaluating the effects of light at night, sleep patterns, and night shift work on prostate cancer risk.
Address Centre of Public Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. lara@sessionimpossible.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1055-9965 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:22564869; PMCID:PMC3392423 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 516
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