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Author (up) Ayalon, I.; de Barros Marangoni, L.F.; Benichou, J.I.C.; Avisar, D.; Levy, O.
Title Red Sea corals under Artificial Light Pollution at Night (ALAN) undergo oxidative stress and photosynthetic impairment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 25 Issue 12 Pages 4194-4207
Keywords Animals; *Anthozoa; Coral Reefs; Ecosystem; Indian Ocean; Oxidative Stress; Photosynthesis; Alan; Ros; corals; light pollution; photosynthesis; physiology
Abstract Coral reefs represent the most diverse marine ecosystem on the planet, yet they are undergoing an unprecedented decline due to a combination of increasing global and local stressors. Despite the wealth of research investigating these stressors, Artificial Light Pollution at Night (ALAN) or “ecological light pollution” represents an emerging threat that has received little attention in the context of coral reefs, despite the potential of disrupting the chronobiology, physiology, behavior, and other biological processes of coral reef organisms. Scleractinian corals, the framework builders of coral reefs, depend on lunar illumination cues to synchronize their biological rhythms such as behavior, reproduction and physiology. While, light pollution (POL) may mask and lead de-synchronization of these biological rhythms process. To reveal if ALAN impacts coral physiology, we have studied two coral species, Acropora eurystoma and Pocillopora damicornis, from the Gulf of Eilat/Aqaba, Red Sea, which is undergoing urban development that has led to severe POL at night. Our two experimental design data revealed that corals exposed to ALAN face an oxidative stress condition, show lower photosynthesis performances measured by electron transport rate (ETR), as well as changes in chlorophyll and algae density parameters. Testing different lights such as Blue LED and White LED spectrum showed more extreme impact in comparison to Yellow LEDs on coral physiology. The finding of this work sheds light on the emerging threat of POL and the impacts on the biology and ecology of Scleractinian corals, and will help to formulate specific management implementations to mitigate its potentially harmful impacts.
Address Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31512309; PMCID:PMC6900201 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2809
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Author (up) Bautista-Covarrubias, J.C.; Zamora-Ibarra, P.A.; Apreza-Burgos, E.; Rodriguez-Ocampo, A.N.; Peraza-Gomez, V.; Lopez-Sanchez, J.A.; Pacheco-Vega, J.M.; Gonzalez-Hermoso, J.P.; Frias-Espericueta, M.G.
Title Immune response and oxidative stress of shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei at different moon phases Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Fish & Shellfish Immunology Abbreviated Journal Fish Shellfish Immunol
Volume 106 Issue Pages 591-595
Keywords Moonlight; Animals; Moon phase; Oxidative stress; Sod; Shrimp; Vibrio
Abstract Moon phases influence the molting process of shrimp, which affect other physiological processes as immune response. This study analyzed some parameters of immune response: total hemocytes counts (THC), hemolymph clotting time and superoxide anion (O2(-)) production, total protein concentration, superoxide dismutase activity, and the presence of Vibrio spp. in Litopenaeus vannamei at different moon phases. The highest percentage of organisms in intermolt stage was observed in the first quarter moon phase (95%). The highest THC was observed at new moon phase, which was significantly different (p < 0.05) than that observed at the third quarter phase. Hemolymph clotting time and CFU values of Vibrio spp. showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) between different moon phases. The higher (p < 0.05) mean O2(-) production value (0.400 +/- 0.168 nmol min(-1) mL(-1)) was determined in hepatopancreas at new moon phase. No relationship was observed between O2(-) and SOD activity, indicating that this antioxidant response was enough to counteract the influence of oxidative stress in L. vannamei at different moon phases.
Address Laboratorio de Estudios Ambientales, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Paseo Claussen s/n, Mazatlan, Sinaloa, C.P. 82000, Mexico
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1050-4648 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32846243 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3100
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Author (up) Navara, K.J.; Nelson, R.J.
Title The dark side of light at night: physiological, epidemiological, and ecological consequences Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 215-224
Keywords Animals; Biological Clocks; *Darkness; Disease; Ecology; Humans; Oxidative Stress; Work
Abstract Organisms must adapt to the temporal characteristics of their surroundings to successfully survive and reproduce. Variation in the daily light cycle, for example, acts through endocrine and neurobiological mechanisms to control several downstream physiological and behavioral processes. Interruptions in normal circadian light cycles and the resulting disruption of normal melatonin rhythms cause widespread disruptive effects involving multiple body systems, the results of which can have serious medical consequences for individuals, as well as large-scale ecological implications for populations. With the invention of electrical lights about a century ago, the temporal organization of the environment has been drastically altered for many species, including humans. In addition to the incidental exposure to light at night through light pollution, humans also engage in increasing amounts of shift-work, resulting in repeated and often long-term circadian disruption. The increasing prevalence of exposure to light at night has significant social, ecological, behavioral, and health consequences that are only now becoming apparent. This review addresses the complicated web of potential behavioral and physiological consequences resulting from exposure to light at night, as well as the large-scale medical and ecological implications that may result.
Address Department of Psychology, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA. knavara@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:17803517 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 17
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Author (up) Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.X.; Korkmaz, A.; Rosales-Corral, S.A.
Title Melatonin and stable circadian rhythms optimize maternal, placental and fetal physiology Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Human Reproduction Update Abbreviated Journal Hum Reprod Update
Volume 20 Issue 2 Pages 293-307
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Antioxidants/physiology; Biological Clocks/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Fetus/*physiology; Humans; Mammals; Melatonin/biosynthesis/*physiology; Mice; Oxidative Stress/physiology; Parturition/physiology; Placenta/metabolism/*physiology; Pre-Eclampsia/etiology/metabolism; Pregnancy; Uterus/metabolism; circadian rhythms; fetus; melatonin; placenta; pre-eclampsia
Abstract BACKGROUND: Research within the last decade has shown melatonin to have previously-unsuspected beneficial actions on the peripheral reproductive organs. Likewise, numerous investigations have documented that stable circadian rhythms are also helpful in maintaining reproductive health. The relationship of melatonin and circadian rhythmicity to maternal and fetal health is summarized in this review. METHODS: Databases were searched for the related published English literature up to 15 May 2013. The search terms used in various combinations included melatonin, circadian rhythms, biological clock, suprachiasmatic nucleus, ovary, pregnancy, uterus, placenta, fetus, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, ischemia-reperfusion, chronodisruption, antioxidants, oxidative stress and free radicals. The results of the studies uncovered are summarized herein. RESULTS: Both melatonin and circadian rhythms impact reproduction, especially during pregnancy. Melatonin is a multifaceted molecule with direct free radical scavenging and indirect antioxidant activities. Melatonin is produced in both the ovary and in the placenta where it protects against molecular mutilation and cellular dysfunction arising from oxidative/nitrosative stress. The placenta, in particular, is often a site of excessive free radical generation due to less than optimal adhesion to the uterine wall, which leads to either persistent hypoxia or intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation, processes that cause massive free radical generation and organ dysfunction. This may contribute to pre-eclampsia and other disorders which often complicate pregnancy. Melatonin has ameliorated free radical damage to the placenta and to the fetus in experiments using non-human mammals. Likewise, the maintenance of a regular maternal light/dark and sleep/wake cycle is important to stabilize circadian rhythms generated by the maternal central circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Optimal circadian rhythmicity in the mother is important since her circadian clock, either directly or indirectly via the melatonin rhythm, programs the developing master oscillator of the fetus. Experimental studies have shown that disturbed maternal circadian rhythms, referred to as chronodisruption, and perturbed melatonin cycles have negative consequences for the maturing fetal oscillators, which may lead to psychological and behavioral problems in the newborn. To optimize regular circadian rhythms and prevent disturbances of the melatonin cycle during pregnancy, shift work and bright light exposure at night should be avoided, especially during the last trimester of pregnancy. Finally, melatonin synergizes with oxytocin to promote delivery of the fetus. Since blood melatonin levels are normally highest during the dark period, the propensity of childbirth to occur at night may relate to the high levels of melatonin at this time which work in concert with oxytocin to enhance the strength of uterine contractions. CONCLUSIONS: A number of conclusions naturally evolve from the data summarized in this review: (i) melatonin, of both pineal and placental origin, has essential functions in fetal maturation and placenta/uterine homeostasis; (ii) circadian clock genes, which are components of all cells including those in the peripheral reproductive organs, have important roles in reproductive and organismal (fetal and maternal) physiology; (iii) due to the potent antioxidant actions of melatonin, coupled with its virtual absence of toxicity, this indoleamine may have utility in the treatment of pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, placental and fetal ischemia/reperfusion, etc. (iv) the propensity for parturition to occur at night may relate to the synergism between the nocturnal increase in melatonin and oxytocin.
Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1355-4786 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24132226 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 504
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Author (up) Sharma, A.; Goyal, R.
Title Long-term exposure to constant light induces dementia, oxidative stress and promotes aggregation of sub-pathological Abeta42 in Wistar rats Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior Abbreviated Journal Pharmacol Biochem Behav
Volume in press Issue Pages 172892
Keywords Animals; Amyloid beta; Behavior, fluoxetine, rifampicin; Oxidative stress
Abstract Constant exposure to light is prevalent in modern society where light noise, shift work, and jet lag is common. Constant light exposure disrupts circadian rhythm, induces stress and thus influences memory performance. We subjected adult male Wistar rats to a two-month exposure to constant light (LL), constant dark or normal light-dark cycles. Significant cognitive impairment and oxidative stress were observed in LL rats without a significant elevation in soluble Abeta1-42 levels. Next, we examined whether long-term exposure to constant light may accelerate dementia in a sub-pathological Abeta model of rats. Normal control rats received ACSF, AD rats received 440pmol, and sub-pathological Abeta rats (Abeta(s)) received 220pmol of human Abeta42 peptide in a single unilateral ICV administration. Sub-pathological Abeta rats exposed to constant light (LL+Abeta(s)) show significant memory deficits and oxidative damage, although not significantly different from LL rats. Additionally, constant light promoted aggregation of exogenous Abeta42 in LL+Abeta(s) rats shown by the presence of congophilic plaques. Furthermore, chronic fluoxetine treatment (5mg/kg/day) rescued rats from the behavioral deficits, oxidative damage and amyloid aggregation. Whereas, rifampicin treatment (20mg/kg/day) did not reverse the behavioral deficits or oxidative stress but rescued rats from amyloid plaque formation. It was concluded that constant light for two months induces behavioral deficits, oxidative stress, and accelerates aggregation of sub-pathological concentrations of human-Abeta42 peptides in Wistar rats, which is reversed by daily fluoxetine administration.
Address Neuropharmacology Laboratory, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shoolini University, Solan 173 212, Himachal Pradesh, India. Electronic address: rohitgoyal@shooliniuniversity.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-3057 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32142744 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2841
Permanent link to this record