toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Cajochen, C.; Jud, C.; Munch, M.; Kobialka, S.; Wirz-Justice, A.; Albrecht, U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evening exposure to blue light stimulates the expression of the clock gene PER2 in humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci  
  Volume 23 Issue 4 Pages 1082-1086  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Color; Darkness; Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation; Female; Gene Expression/*radiation effects; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Mucous Membrane/metabolism/radiation effects; Nuclear Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Period Circadian Proteins; Transcription Factors/genetics/*metabolism  
  Abstract We developed a non-invasive method to measure and quantify human circadian PER2 gene expression in oral mucosa samples and show that this gene oscillates in a circadian (= about a day) fashion. We also have the first evidence that induction of human PER2 expression is stimulated by exposing subjects to 2 h of light in the evening. This increase in PER2 expression was statistically significant in comparison to a non-light control condition only after light at 460 nm (blue) but not after light exposure at 550 nm (green). Our results indicate that the non-image-forming visual system is involved in human circadian gene expression. The demonstration of a functional circadian machinery in human buccal samples and its response to light opens the door for investigation of human circadian rhythms at the gene level and their associated disorders.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric University Clinics, University of Basel, CH-4025 Basel, Switzerland. christian.cajochen@unibas.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16519674 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 727  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chellappa, S.L.; Viola, A.U.; Schmidt, C.; Bachmann, V.; Gabel, V.; Maire, M.; Reichert, C.F.; Valomon, A.; Gotz, T.; Landolt, H.-P.; Cajochen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human melatonin and alerting response to blue-enriched light depend on a polymorphism in the clock gene PER3 Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Abbreviated Journal J Clin Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume 97 Issue 3 Pages E433-7  
  Keywords Adult; Alleles; Cross-Over Studies; Female; Genotype; Homozygote; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/*blood/genetics; *Minisatellite Repeats; Period Circadian Proteins/*genetics; *Polymorphism, Genetic; Questionnaires; Sleep/genetics; Wakefulness/*genetics  
  Abstract CONTEXT: Light exposure, particularly at the short-wavelength range, triggers several nonvisual responses in humans. However, the extent to which the melatonin-suppressing and alerting effect of light differs among individuals remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: Here we investigated whether blue-enriched polychromatic light impacts differentially on melatonin and subjective and objective alertness in healthy participants genotyped for the PERIOD3 (PER3) variable-number, tandem-repeat polymorphism. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen healthy young men homozygous for the PER3 polymorphism (PER3(5/5)and PER3(4/4)) underwent a balanced crossover design during the winter season, with light exposure to compact fluorescent lamps of 40 lux at 6500 K and at 2500 K during 2 h in the evening. RESULTS: In comparison to light at 2500 K, blue-enriched light at 6500 K induced a significant suppression of the evening rise in endogenous melatonin levels in PER3(5/5) individuals but not in PER3(4/4). Likewise, PER3(5/5) individuals exhibited a more pronounced alerting response to light at 6500 K than PER3(4/4) volunteers. Waking electroencephalographic activity in the theta range (5-7 Hz), a putative correlate of sleepiness, was drastically attenuated during light exposure at 6500 K in PER3(5/5) individuals as compared with PER3(4/4). CONCLUSIONS: We provide first evidence that humans homozygous for the PER3 5/5 allele are particularly sensitive to blue-enriched light, as indexed by the suppression of endogenous melatonin and waking theta activity. Light sensitivity in humans may be modulated by a clock gene polymorphism implicated in the sleep-wake regulation.  
  Address Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel, Wilhelm Kleinstrasse 27, CH-4012 Basel, Switzerland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-972X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22188742 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 301  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Filipski, E.; Li, X.M.; Levi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disruption of circadian coordination and malignant growth Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 509-514  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Biological Clocks; Body Temperature; Cell Cycle Proteins; Cell Line, Tumor; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm; Corticosterone/blood; DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism; Jet Lag Syndrome/complications/physiopathology; Lymphocyte Count; Mice; Neoplasm Transplantation; Nuclear Proteins/metabolism; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group D, Member 1; Osteosarcoma/*pathology/physiopathology; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*pathology/physiopathology; Period Circadian Proteins; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/metabolism; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiopathology; Transcription Factors/metabolism  
  Abstract Altered circadian rhythms predicted for poor survival in patients with metastatic colorectal or breast cancer. An increased incidence of cancers has been reported in flying attendants and in women working predominantly at night. To explore the contribution of circadian structure to tumor growth we ablated the 24-h rest-activity cycle and markedly altered the rhythms in body temperature, serum corticosterone and lymphocyte count in mice by complete stereotaxic destruction of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) or by subjecting the mice to experimental chronic jet-lag. Such disruption of circadian coordination significantly accelerated malignant growth in two transplantable tumor models, Glasgow osteosarcoma and Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The mRNA expression of clock genes per2 and reverb-alpha in controls displayed significant circadian rhythms in the liver (Cosinor, p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively) and in the tumor (p=0.04 and p<0.001, respectively). Both rhythms were suppressed in the liver and in the tumor of jet lagged mice. This functional disturbance of molecular clock resulted in down regulation of p53 and overexpression of c-Myc, two effects which may favor cancer growth. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that circadian system could play an important role in malignant growth control. This should be taken into consideration in cancer prevention and therapy.  
  Address INSERM E 354 Cancer Chronotherapeutics, Hopital Paul Brousse, Villejuif, France. filipski@vjf.inserm.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596304 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 748  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Froy, O.; Gotter, A.L.; Casselman, A.L.; Reppert, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating the circadian clock in monarch butterfly migration Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science  
  Volume 300 Issue 5623 Pages 1303-1305  
  Keywords Animals; *Animal Migration; Biological Clocks/*physiology; Butterflies/genetics/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cloning, Molecular; Darkness; Flight, Animal; Light; Nuclear Proteins/genetics/physiology; Period Circadian Proteins; Solar System; Ultraviolet Rays; butterflies; monarch  
  Abstract Migratory monarch butterflies use a time-compensated Sun compass to navigate to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Here, we report that constant light, which disrupts circadian clock function at both the behavioral and molecular levels in monarchs, also disrupts the time-compensated component of flight navigation. We further show that ultraviolet light is important for flight navigation but is not required for photic entrainment of circadian rhythms. Tracing these distinct light-input pathways into the brain should aid our understanding of the clock-compass mechanisms necessary for successful migration.  
  Address Department of Neurobiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, LRB-728, 364 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA 01605, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:12764200 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1072  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kempinger, L.; Dittmann, R.; Rieger, D.; Helfrich-Forster, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The nocturnal activity of fruit flies exposed to artificial moonlight is partly caused by direct light effects on the activity level that bypass the endogenous clock Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 26 Issue 2 Pages 151-166  
  Keywords ARNTL Transcription Factors; Animals; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Biological Clocks/*physiology; CLOCK Proteins; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Darkness; Drosophila Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Drosophila melanogaster/*physiology; *Light; *Moon; Motor Activity/*physiology; Nuclear Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Period Circadian Proteins; Photoperiod; Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism  
  Abstract Artificial moonlight was recently shown to shift the endogenous clock of fruit flies and make them nocturnal. To test whether this nocturnal activity is partly due to masking effects of light, we exposed the clock-mutants per(01), tim(01), per(01);tim(01), cyc(01), and Clk(JRK) to light/dark and light/dim-light cycles and determined the activity level during the day and night. We found that under moonlit nights, all clock mutants shifted their activity significantly into the night, suggesting that this effect is independent of the clock. We also recorded the flies under continuous artificial moonlight and darkness to judge the effect of dim constant light on the activity level. All mutants, except Clk(JRK) flies, were significantly more active under artificial moonlight conditions than under complete darkness. Unexpectedly, we found residual rhythmicity of per(01) and especially tim(01) mutants under these conditions, suggesting that TIM and especially PER retained some activity in the absence of its respective partner. Nevertheless, as even the double mutants and the cyc(01) and Clk(JRK) mutants shifted their activity into the night, we conclude that dim light stimulates the activity of fruit flies in a clock-independent manner. Thus, nocturnal light has a twofold influence on flies: it shifts the circadian clock, and it increases nocturnal activity independently of the clock. The latter was also observed in some primates by others and might therefore be of a more general validity.  
  Address Institute of Zoology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19212834 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 113  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: