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Author (down) Rodrí­guez, A.; Rodrí­guez, B.; Lucas, M.P.
Title Trends in numbers of petrels attracted to artificial lights suggest population declines in Tenerife, Canary Islands Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Ibis Abbreviated Journal
Volume 154 Issue 1 Pages 167-172
Keywords Animals; birds; petrels; Cory's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; Bulwer's Petrel; Bulweria bulwerii; Macaronesian Shearwater; Puffinus baroli; reproductive strategies
Abstract The secretive breeding behaviour of petrels makes monitoring their breeding populations challenging. To assess population trends of Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea, Bulwer's Petrel Bulweria bulwerii and Macaronesian Shearwater Puffinus baroli in Tenerife from 1990 to 2010, we used data from rescue campaigns that aim to reduce the mortality of fledgling petrels attracted to artificial lights as proxies for trends in breeding population size. Despite increases in human population size and light pollution, the number of rescued fledglings of Cory's Shearwater and Bulwer's Petrel increased and remained stable, respectively, whereas numbers of rescued Macaronesian Shearwaters sharply declined. In the absence of more accurate population estimates, these results suggest a worrying decline in the Macaronesian Shearwater's breeding population.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 38
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Author (down) Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, B.; Curbelo, Á.J.; Pérez, A.; Marrero, S.; Negro, J.J.; Katzner, T.
Title Factors affecting mortality of shearwaters stranded by light pollution: Mortality of shearwaters attracted by light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal Anim Conserv
Volume 15 Issue 5 Pages 519-526
Keywords Cory's shearwater; Calonectris diomedea; birds; petrels; collisions; animals
Abstract Every year and across the world, thousands of fledglings of different petrel species crash into human structures because they are disorientated by artificial lights during their first flights. As this phenomenon is rather predictable, rescue campaigns are organized to help birds to reach the ocean, but unfortunately, a low proportion gets hurt or dies. Despite the huge number of affected individuals, and the fact that the problem was detected a long time ago, little is known on this source of mortality. We have studied the factors (i.e. body condition, plumage development, fledging date and sex) influencing the mortality of Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea fledglings stranded inland due to light pollution in Tenerife (Canary Islands) during two consecutive breeding seasons (2009 and 2010). Late fledglings showed lower values of a body condition index than early ones. No sex biases were detected, neither considering stranded birds overall, nor for recovery dates or in the body condition of rescued fledglings. Our results indicate that late birds stranded by lights showing abundant down are more susceptible to fatal collisions and that the lights do not selectively kill birds with lower body condition indices. An enhancement of veterinary care should be done during the last part of the fledging period when more fatal collisions occur, especially focused on fledglings with abundant down. More research to determine why some individuals end up disoriented around artificial lights and others do not is urgently needed to minimize or prevent fallouts.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1367-9430 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 55
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Author (down) Rodríguez, A.; Arcos, J.M.; Bretagnolle, V.; Dias, M.P.; Holmes, N.D.; Louzao, M.; Provencher, J.; Raine, A.F.; Ramírez, F.; Rodríguez, B.; Ronconi, R.A.; Taylor, R.S.; Bonnaud, E.; Borrelle, S.B.; Cortés, V.; Descamps, S.; Friesen, V.L.; Genovart, M.; Hedd, A.; Hodum, P.; Humphries, G.R.W.; Le Corre, M.; Lebarbenchon, C.; Martin, R.; Melvin, E.F.; Montevecchi, W.A.; Pinet, P.; Pollet, I.L.; Ramos, R.; Russell, J.C.; Ryan, P.G.; Sanz-Aguilar, A.; Spatz, D.R.; Travers, M.; Votier, S.C.; Wanless, R.M.; Woehler, E.; Chiaradia, A.
Title Future Directions in Conservation Research on Petrels and Shearwaters Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Issue Pages 94
Keywords Animals; Birds; Seabirds; Petrels; Shearwaters; Review
Abstract Shearwaters and petrels (hereafter petrels) are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world’s oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 124 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity and are thus vulnerable to change. Anthropogenic alterations on land and at sea have led to a poor conservation status of many petrels with 52 (42%) threatened species based on IUCN criteria and 65 (52%) suffering population declines. Some species are well-studied, even being used as bioindicators of ocean health, yet for others there are major knowledge gaps regarding their breeding grounds, migratory areas or other key aspects of their biology and ecology. We assembled 38 petrel conservation researchers to summarize information regarding the most important threats according to the IUCN Red List of threatened species to identify knowledge gaps that must be filled to improve conservation and management of petrels. We highlight research advances on the main threats for petrels (invasive species at breeding grounds, bycatch, overfishing, light pollution, climate change, and pollution). We propose an ambitious goal to reverse at least some of these six main threats, through active efforts such as restoring island habitats (e.g., invasive species removal, control and prevention), improving policies and regulations at global and regional levels, and engaging local communities in conservation efforts.
Address Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD) Seville, Spain
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ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2283
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Author (down) Glass, J.; Ryan, P.
Title Reduced seabird night strikes and mortality in the Tristan rock lobster fishery Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication African Journal of Marine Science Abbreviated Journal African Journal of Marine Science
Volume 35 Issue 4 Pages 589-592
Keywords storm petrels; Pelagodroma marina; Fregetta grallaria; Fregetta tropica; common diving petrel; Pelecanoides urinatrix; broad-billed prion; Pachyptila vittata; Tristan rock lobster; Jasus tristani; seabirds; birds; collision; Gough Island; Tristan
Abstract The main impact of the fishery for Tristan rock lobster Jasus tristani on seabirds at the Tristan archipelago and Gough Island is through night strikes, when petrels collide with a ship after being disorientated by its lights. Tristan fishery observers have kept records of night strikes on the MV Edinburgh since the 2010/2011 fishing season. Over the last three years, 723 seabirds from nine species were recorded coming aboard the fishing vessel, with at least 39 (5.4%) birds dying as a result. Birds killed were broad-billed prions Pachyptila vittata (41%), common diving petrels Pelecanoides urinatrix (23%), and storm petrels (Pelagodroma marina and Fregetta grallaria/tropica 36%). All these species are listed as Least Concern globally, and the numbers killed per year are <0.1% of the island populations. The captain and crew of the Edinburgh are aware of the problem posed by deck lights at night, and attempt to keep external lighting to a minimum. As a result, the numbers of birds coming aboard vessels in this fishery have decreased from an average of 130 birds per night in 1989 to less than two birds per night in 2010–2013. Currently, most incidents occur during exceptional events when circumstances require deck lights to be lit at night. Consideration should be given to banning fishing operations at night, at least on misty nights.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1814-232X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 53
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