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Author (up) Grunsven van, Roy H.A.; Creemers, Raymond; Joosten, Kris; Donners Maurice; Veenendaal, Elmar M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Behaviour of migrating toads under artificial lights differs from other phases of their life cycle Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Amphibia-Reptilia Abbreviated Journal AMRE  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords animal, amphibia, Anura, fragmentation, light pollution, mitigation, phototaxis, spectra  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1568  
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Author (up) Hauptfleisch, M.; Dalton, C. openurl 
  Title Arthropod phototaxis and its possible effect on bird strike risk at two Namibian airports Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Applied Ecology and Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Appl. Ecol. & Environ. Res.  
  Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 957-965  
  Keywords Animals; airport; arthropods; birds; bird strike; phototaxis; Lepidoptera; Namibia  
  Abstract Aircraft wildlife collisions are a global safety and financial problem for the aviation industry, with birds being the main concern. In Namibia, 97% of collisions at Namibia’s two main airports are reported to be with insectivorous birds. Phototaxis was identified as a major attractant to insectivorous

birds, which feed on the arthropods attracted to airport apron and terminal lights. This study considered the effect of light as an attraction at the rurally situated Hosea Kutako International and urban Eros airports. It further investigated the attractiveness of light colour (or wavelength) on arthropod abundance, biomass and diversity. The study found that phototaxis was a significant factor at Hosea Kutako only, and that white light was the main attractant for arthropods, specifically for large moths (Order Lepidoptera),

while yellow and orange light attracted significantly less arthropods. The study indicates a high likelihood that the Hosea Kutako apron lights (white) are an important attractant for arthropods, and therefore indirectly insectivorous birds, which can be reduced by replacing them with orange or yellow filters.
 
  Address Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences, Polytechnic of Namibia, Private Bag 13388, Windhoek, Namibia; mhauptfleisch@polytechnic.edu.na  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Aloki Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1160  
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Author (up) Kim, K.-N.; Huang, Q.-Y.; Lei, C.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Advances in insect phototaxis and application to pest management: A review Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Pest Management Science Abbreviated Journal Pest Manag Sci  
  Volume 75 Issue 12 Pages 3135-3143  
  Keywords Animals; review; Insects; Phototaxis; Integrated pest management  
  Abstract Many insects, especially nocturnal insects, exhibit positive phototaxis to artificial lights. Many light traps are currently used to monitor and manage insect pest populations, with light traps playing a crucial role in physical pest control. Efficient use of light traps to attract target insect pests becomes an important topic in application of integrated pest management (IPM). Phototactic responses of insects vary among species, light characteristics and the physiological status of the insects. In addition, light can cause several biological responses, including biochemical, physiological, molecular and fitness changes in insects. In this review, we discuss several hypotheses on insect phototaxis, affecting factors on insect phototaxis, insect sensitive wavelengths, biological responses of insects to light and countermeasures for conserving beneficial insects and increasing trapping effect. Additionally, we provide information on the different sensitivities to wavelengths causing positive phototactic behavior on more than 70 insect pest and beneficial insect species. The use of advanced light traps equipped with superior light sources, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), will make physical pest control in IPM more efficient. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Hubei Insect Resources Utilization and Sustainable Pest Management Key Laboratory, College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei 430070, China  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 1526-498X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31251458 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2574  
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Author (up) Longcore, T.; Aldern, H.L.; Eggers, J.F.; Flores, S.; Franco, L.; Hirshfield-Yamanishi, E.; Petrinec, L.N.; Yan, W.A.; Barroso, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Tuning the white light spectrum of light emitting diode lamps to reduce attraction of nocturnal arthropods Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci  
  Volume 370 Issue Pages 20140125  
  Keywords Lighting; Animals; insects; light emitting diodes; LEDs; arthropods; Phototaxis; indoor lighting; vector-borne disease  
  Abstract Artificial lighting allows humans to be active at night, but has many unintended consequences, including interference with ecological processes, disruption of circadian rhythms and increased exposure to insect vectors of diseases. Although ultraviolet and blue light are usually most attractive to arthropods, degree of attraction varies among orders. With a focus on future indoor lighting applications, we manipulated the spectrum of white lamps to investigate the influence of spectral composition on number of arthropods attracted. We compared numbers of arthropods captured at three customizable light-emitting diode (LED) lamps (3510, 2704 and 2728 K), two commercial LED lamps (2700 K), two commercial compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs; 2700 K) and a control. We configured the three custom LEDs to minimize invertebrate attraction based on published attraction curves for honeybees and moths. Lamps were placed with pan traps at an urban and two rural study sites in Los Angeles, California. For all invertebrate orders combined, our custom LED configurations were less attractive than the commercial LED lamps or CFLs of similar colour temperatures. Thus, adjusting spectral composition of white light to minimize attracting nocturnal arthropods is feasible; not all lights with the same colour temperature are equally attractive to arthropods.  
  Address Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; longcore@usc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1122  
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Author (up) Shimoda, M.; Honda, K.-ichiro url  doi
openurl 
  Title Insect reactions to light and its applications to pest management Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Applied Entomology and Zoology Abbreviated Journal Appl Entomol Zool  
  Volume 48 Issue 4 Pages 413-421  
  Keywords ultraviolet; light; Integrated pest management; Artificial lighting; Photoreception; Phototaxis; Light-emitting diode; *Lighting  
  Abstract Insects are able to see ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Nocturnal insects are often attracted to light sources that emit large amounts of UV radiation, and devices that exploit this behavior, such as light traps for forecasting pest outbreaks, and electric insect killers, have been developed. Some diurnal species are attracted to yellow; yellow pan traps are used for conducting surveys for pest outbreaks and yellow sticky plates are used for pest control. Lamps that give off yellow illumination have been used effectively to control the activity of nocturnal moths and thus reduce damage to fruit, vegetables, and flowers. Covering cultivation facilities with film that filters out near-UV radiation reduces the invasion of pests such as whiteflies and thrips into the facilities, thus reducing damage. Reflective material placed on cultivated land can control the approach of flying insects such as aphids. Future development and use of new light sources such as light-emitting diodes is anticipated for promoting integrated pest management.  
  Address  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-6862 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 110  
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