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Author Borges, R.M. openurl 
  Title Dark Matters: Challenges of Nocturnal Communication Between Plants and Animals in Delivery of Pollination Services Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 91 Issue 1 Pages 33-42  
  Keywords Plants; Animals  
  Abstract The night is a special niche characterized by dim light, lower temperatures, and higher humidity compared to the day. Several animals have made the transition from the day into the night and have acquired unique adaptations to cope with the challenges of performing nocturnal activities. Several plant species have opted to bloom at night, possibly as a response to aridity to prevent excessive water loss through evapotranspiration since flowering is often a water-demanding process, or to protect pollen from heat stress. Nocturnal pollinators have visual adaptations to function under dim light conditions but may also trade off vision against olfaction when they are dependent on nectar-rewarding and scented flowers. Nocturnal pollinators may use CO2 and humidity cues emanating from freshly-opened flowers as indicators of nectar-rich resources. Some endothermic nocturnal insect pollinators are attracted to thermogenic flowers within which they remain to obtain heat as a reward to increase their energy budget. This review focuses on mechanisms that pollinators use to find flowers at night, and the signals that nocturnally blooming flowers may employ to attract pollinators under dim light conditions. It also indicates gaps in our knowledge. While millions of years of evolutionary time have given pollinators and plants solutions to the delivery of pollination services and to the offering of appropriate rewards, this history of successful evolution is being threatened by artificial light at night. Excessive and inappropriate illumination associated with anthropogenic activities has resulted in significant light pollution which serves to undermine life processes governed by dim light.  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1832  
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Author Brelsford, CC; Robson, TM url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue light advances bud burst in branches of three deciduous tree species under short-day conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Trees Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 1157-1164  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract During spring, utilising multiple cues allow tree species from temperate and boreal regions to coordinate their bud burst and leaf out, at the right moment to capitalise on favourable conditions for photosynthesis. Whilst the effect of blue light (400–500 nm) has been shown to increase percentage bud burst of axillary shoots of Rosa sp., the effects of blue light on spring-time bud burst of deciduous tree species have not previously been reported. We tested the hypotheses that blue light would advance spring bud burst in tree species, and that late-successional species would respond more than early-successional species, whose bud burst is primarily determined by temperature. The bud development of Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula, and Quercus robur branches, cut from dormant trees, was monitored under two light treatments of equal photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400–700 nm) and temperature, either with or without blue light, under controlled environmental conditions. In the presence of blue light, the mean time required to reach 50% bud burst was reduced by 3.3 days in Betula pendula, 6 days in Alnus glutinosa, and 6.3 days in Quercus robur. This result highlights the potential of the blue region of the solar spectrum to be used as an extra cue that could help plants to regulate their spring phenology, alongside photoperiod and temperature. Understanding how plants combine photoreceptor-mediated cues with other environmental cues such as temperature to control phenology is essential if we are to accurately predict how tree species might respond to climate change.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1847  
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Author Palmer M; Gibbons R; Bhagavathula R; Holshouser D; Davidson D openurl 
  Title Roadway lighting's impact on altering soybean growth: Volume 1 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Illinois Center for Transportation Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Research Report No. FHWA - ICT - 17 - 010 Issue Pages  
  Keywords plants; Lighting  
  Abstract The impact of roadway lighting on soybean plant growth and development was measured in situ at seven locations in the state of Illinois. The plant data collection included periodic height, reproductive stage, and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), as well as plant moisture content and dried seed weight after harvest. The periodic measurements were made at the same locations over time to determine delays in plant development. The impact of roadway lighting trespass was significant and measurable above thresholds of both horizontal and vertical illuminance as well as a combination of the two. A specification was drafted to minimize the impact of roadway lighting trespass on the soybean, and countermeasures were recommended to control the impact of lighting on the soybean.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1943  
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Author Palmer, M.; Gibbons, R.; Bhagavathula, R.; Holshouser, D. url  openurl
  Title Roadway Lighting’s Impact on Altering Soybean Growth – Volume 2: LED versus HPS Color Spectral Impact Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Technical Report Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume FHWA-ICT-18-009 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract The impact of roadway lighting on soybean plant growth and development, was measured in situ at three locations in the state of Illinois. These locations were situated in close proximity of each other for the purpose of evaluating whether there was a difference in the soy response to HPS roadway lighting, versus soy lit by a specific model of 4,000K LED roadway lighting. The plant data collection included the reproductive-stage, the plant moisture content, and the dried seed weight after harvest. The impact of the type of roadway lighting on the reproduction stage and normalized yield was within the modeling confidence limits at a level of 90%. Modifications are recommended to the specification for roadway lighting trespass. This will minimize the impact on soybean plants based on the two roadway luminaire designs included in this study.  
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  Publisher Illinois Center for Transportation/Illinois Department of Transportation Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0197-9191 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2264  
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Author Owen, W. G., & Lopez, R. G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparison of Sole-source and Supplemental Lighting on Callus Formation and Initial Rhizogenesis of Gaura and Salvia Cuttings Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 684-691  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Variability in outdoor daily temperatures and photosynthetic daily light integrals (DLIs) from early spring to late fall limits the ability of propagators to accurately control propagation environments to consistently callus, root, and yield compact herbaceous perennial rooted liners. We evaluated and compared the effects of sole-source lighting (SSL) delivered from red (R) and blue (B) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to supplemental lighting (SL) provided by high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on herbaceous perennial cutting morphology, physiology, and growth during callusing and initial rhizogenesis. Cuttings of perennial sage (Salvia nemorosa L. ‘Lyrical Blues’) and wand flower (Gaura lindheimeri Engelm. and A. Gray ‘Siskiyou Pink’) were propagated in a walk-in growth chamber under multilayer SSL provided by LEDs with [R (660 nm)]:[B (460 nm)] light ratios (%) of 100:0 (R100:B0), 75:25 (R75:B25), 50:50 (R50:B50), or 0:100 (R0:B100) delivering 60 µmol·m−2·s–1 for 16 hours (total DLI of 3.4 mol·m−2·d−1). In a glass-glazed greenhouse (GH control), cuttings were propagated under ambient solar light and day-extension SL provided by HPS lamps delivering 40 µmol·m−2·s–1 to provide a 16-hour photoperiod (total DLI of 3.3 mol·m−2·d−1). At 10 days after sticking cuttings, callus diameter and rooting percentage were similar among all light-quality treatments. For instance, callus diameter, a measure of growth, of wand flower cuttings increased from an average 1.7 mm at stick (0 day) to a range of 2.7 to 2.9 mm at 10 days after sticking, regardless of lighting treatment. Relative leaf chlorophyll content was generally greater under SSL R75:B25 or R50:B50 than all other light-quality treatments. However, stem length of perennial sage and wand flower cuttings propagated under SSL R50:B50 at 10 days were 21% and 30% shorter and resulted in 50% and 8% greater root biomass, respectively, compared with those under SL. The herbaceous perennial cuttings propagated in this study under SSL R50:B50 were of similar quality or more compact compared with those under SL, indicating that callus induction and initial rooting can occur under LEDs in a multilayer SSL propagation system.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2346  
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