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Author Viera-Perez, M.; Hernandez-Calvento, L.; Hesp, P.A.; Santana-Del Pino, A.
Title Effects of artificial light on flowering of foredune vegetation Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal (up) Ecology
Volume 100 Issue 5 Pages e02678
Keywords Plants; Coastal management; coastal dunes; Canary Islands; Spain; Europe
Abstract The impact of ecological light pollution involves alteration of periods of natural light, a fact that has proven effects on ecosystems. Few studies have focused on the impact of this pollution on wild plant species, and none on coastal dune plants. Many coastal dunes and their plants are adjacent to tourist areas, and these might be affected by light pollution. Such is the case of the Natural Reserve Dunas de Maspalomas (Gran Canaria), where some individuals of the plant species Traganum moquinii, located in the El Ingles beach foredune zone, are affected by light pollution. This study examines the effect of light pollution on the flowering process, and by extension the reproductive cycle of these plants. Plants located closer to high artificial illumination sources receive ~2120 hours per year of intense light more than plants located furthest from those artificial lighting sources. Parts of the plants of Traganum moquinii exposed directly to the artificial light show a significant decrease in the production of flowers, compared to the parts in plants in shade, and to the plants more distant from artificial lights. In consequence, plants exposed more directly to artificial light have a lower potential for seed reproduction. The spectrum of artificial light also affects the plants, and light between 600 and 700 nm primarily affects the reproductive cycle of the Traganum moquinii species. The implications for the ecological and geomorphological functioning of the dune system are discussed, because this species plays a decisive role in the formation of foredune zones and nebkhas in arid dune systems.
Address Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35017, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Ecological Society of America Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30825328 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2244
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Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Effects of street lighting technologies on the success and quality of pollination in a nocturnally pollinated plant Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal (up) Ecosphere
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages e02550
Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly important driver of global change. Lighting directly affects plants, but few studies have investigated indirect effects mediated by interacting organisms. Nocturnal Lepidoptera are globally important pollinators, and pollen transport by moths is disrupted by lighting. Many street lighting systems are being replaced with novel, energy‐efficient lighting, with unknown ecological consequences. Using the wildflower Silene latifolia, we compared pollination success and quality at experimentally lit and unlit plots, testing two major changes to street lighting technology: in lamp type, from high‐pressure sodium lamps to light‐emitting diodes, and in lighting regime, from full‐night (FN) to part‐night (PN) lighting. We predicted that lighting would reduce pollination. S. latifolia was pollinated both diurnally and nocturnally. Contrary to our predictions, flowers under FN lighting had higher pollination success than flowers under either PN lighting or unlit controls, which did not significantly differ from each other. Lamp type, lighting regime, and distance from the light all significantly affected aspects of pollination quality. These results confirm that street lighting could affect plant reproduction through indirect effects mediated by nocturnal insects, and further highlight the possibility for novel lighting technologies to mitigate the effects of ALAN on ecosystems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2174
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Author Ebisawa, M.; Shoji, K.; Kato, M.; Shimomura, K.; Goto, F.; Yoshihara, T.
Title Supplementary Ultraviolet Radiation B Together with Blue Light at Night Increased Quercetin Content and Flavonol Synthase Gene Expression in Leaf Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Environment Control in Biology Abbreviated Journal (up) Environ. Control Biol.
Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 1-11
Keywords Plants
Abstract Establishment of an effective supplementary lighting procedure is necessary to increase the value of leaf lettuce grown using a hydroponic method involving a low production cost. In leaf lettuce extracts, quercetin, one of the flavonoids, was isolated and identified. It was investigated that quercetin has important functions that can be used as a dietary supplement. Flavonol synthase (FLS) is a key enzyme involved in quercetin biosynthesis, catalyzes the conversion of dihydroquercetin to quercetin. Therefore, we determined the sequence of the flavonol synthase gene (FLS) in red leaf lettuce. We harvested leaf lettuce grown using supplementary light sources, such as ultraviolet radiation B (UV-B), ultraviolet radiation A, blue, and red lamps during the night. It is noteworthy that FLS expression and the quercetin content were particularly increased to a greater extent in young leaves than in mature leaves when UV-B and blue light were used simultaneously at night. We suggest that UV-B with blue light is used simultaneously at night for producing leaf lettuce with high quercetin content.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1880-554X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2799
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Author Bian, Z.; Cheng, R.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Lu, C.
Title Effect of green light on nitrate reduction and edible quality of hydroponically grown lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) under short-term continuous light from red and blue light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental and Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal (up) Environmental and Experimental Botany
Volume 153 Issue Pages 63-71
Keywords Plants
Abstract Most leafy vegetables can accumulate large amounts of nitrate, which are often associated with harmful effects on human health. Nitrate assimilation in plants is determined by various growth conditions, especially light conditions including light intensity, light duration and light spectral composition. Red and blue light are the most important since both drive photosynthesis. Increasingly, recent evidence demonstrates a role for green light in the regulation of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of some specific genes. However, the effect of green light on nitrate assimilation has been underestimated. In this study, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Butterhead) was treated with continuous light (CL) for 48 h by combined red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) supplemented with or without green LED in an environment-controlled growth chamber. The results showed that nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR) related-gene expression and nitrate assimilation enzyme activities were affected by light spectral composition and light duration of CL. Adding green light to red and blue light promoted NR and NiR expressions at 24 h, subsequently, it reduced expression of these genes during CL. Compared with red and blue LEDs, green light supplementation significantly increased NR, NiR, glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. Green-light supplementation under red and blue light was more efficient in promoting nutritional values by maintaining high net photosynthetic rates (Pn) and maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0098-8472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1915
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Author Kong, Y.; Stasiak, M.; Dixon, M.A.; Zheng, Y.
Title Blue light associated with low phytochrome activity can promote elongation growth as shade-avoidance response: A comparison with red light in four bedding plant species Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental and Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal (up) Environmental and Experimental Botany
Volume 155 Issue Pages 345-359
Keywords Plants
Abstract o explore the action mode of blue light on elongation growth of bedding plants, the plant growth and morphology traits of petunia (Petunia × hybrida, ‘Duvet Red’), calibrachoa (Calibrachoa × hybrida, ‘Kabloom Deep Blue’), geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum, ‘Pinto Premium Salmon’), and marigold (Tagetes erecta, ‘Antigua Orange’) were compared under four light quality treatments: (1) R, “pure” red light (660 nm); (2) B, “pure” blue light (450 nm); (3) BR, “unpure” blue light created by mixing B with a low level of R to provide B/R ≈ 9; (4) BRF, “unpure” blue light created by adding a low level of far red light to BR with red/far red ≈ 1. Continuous (24-h) light-emitting diode lighting with either 100 or 50 μmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetic photon flux density at ≈ 23℃ was used with the above treatments. After 14–20 day of lighting treatment, B promoted elongation growth compared to R, as demonstrated by a greater canopy height, main stem length, internode length, and daily main stem extension rate. However, BR showed similar or inhibitory effects on these traits relative to R, while BRF exhibited similar promotion effects as B. The calculated phytochrome photoequilibrium, an indication of phytochrome activity, was higher for R (0.89) and BR (0.74) than for B (0.49) and BRF (0.63). Adding red (or far red) light reversed the effects of B (or BR) on elongation growth and the phytochrome photoequilibrium, suggesting that blue light promotion of elongation growth is related to the lower phytochrome activity. Also, B and BRF, when compared to R or BR, promoted elongation growth to a greater degree at 50 than 100 μmol m−2 s−1 for petunia and calibrachoa. In addition to the promoted elongation growth, B and BRF reduced side branch number, biomass allocation to side branches, leaf epinasty, leaf angle, and/or leaf chlorophyll content relative to R or BR, but increased individual leaf area, petiole length, and/or biomass allocation to main stem, which varied with different species. It suggests that the promoted elongation growth by blue light associated with lower phytochrome activity is one of shade-avoidance responses with varying sensitivity among species.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0098-8472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1973
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