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Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Cruse, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.; Lewis, O.
Title Artificial light at night causes top-down and bottom-up trophic effects on invertebrate populations Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal (up) J Appl Ecol
Volume 55 Issue 6 Pages 2698-2706
Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants
Abstract Globally, many ecosystems are exposed to artificial light at night. Nighttime lighting has direct biological impacts on species at all trophic levels. However, the effects of artificial light on biotic interactions remain, for the most part, to be determined.

We exposed experimental mesocosms containing combinations of grassland plants and invertebrate herbivores and predators to illumination at night over a 3‐year period to simulate conditions under different common forms of street lighting.

We demonstrate both top‐down (predation‐controlled) and bottom‐up (resource‐controlled) impacts of artificial light at night in grassland communities. The impacts on invertebrate herbivore abundance were wavelength‐dependent and mediated via other trophic levels.

White LED lighting decreased the abundance of a generalist herbivore mollusc by 55% in the presence of a visual predator, but not in its absence, while monochromatic amber light (with a peak wavelength similar to low‐pressure sodium lighting) decreased abundance of a specialist herbivore aphid (by 17%) by reducing the cover and flower abundance of its main food plant in the system. Artificial white light also significantly increased the food plant's foliar carbon to nitrogen ratio.

We conclude that exposure to artificial light at night can trigger ecological effects spanning trophic levels, and that the nature of such impacts depends on the wavelengths emitted by the lighting technology employed.

Policy implications. Our results confirm that artificial light at night, at illuminance levels similar to roadside vegetation, can have population effects mediated by both top‐down and bottom‐up effects on ecosystems. Given the increasing ubiquity of light pollution at night, these impacts may be widespread in the environment. These results underline the importance of minimizing ecosystem disruption by reducing light pollution in natural and seminatural ecosystems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2086
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Author Margot, J.-L.
Title Insufficient Evidence of Purported Lunar Effect on Pollination in Ephedra Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal (up) J Biol Rhythms
Volume 30 Issue 5 Pages 454-456
Keywords Animals; Plants; Moonlight
Abstract It has been suggested that the timing of pollination in Ephedra foeminea coincides with the full moon in July. The implication is that the plant can detect the full moon through light or gravity and that this trait is an evolutionary adaptation that aids the navigation by pollinating insects. Here we show that there are insufficient data to make such a claim, and we predict that pollinations of E. foeminea do not in general coincide with the full moon.
Address Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USADepartment of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA jlm@astro.ucla.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26316347 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1557
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Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Cruse, D.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Ecological effects of artificial light at night on wild plants Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal (up) J Ecol
Volume 104 Issue 3 Pages 611-620
Keywords Plants; wild plants; photobiology; Circadian; Ecophysiology; light cycles; light pollution; photoperiodism; photopollution; physiology; sky glow; urban ecology
Abstract 1.Plants use light as a source of both energy and information. Plant physiological responses to light, and interactions between plants and animals (such as herbivory and pollination), have evolved under a more or less stable regime of 24-hour cycles of light and darkness, and, outside of the tropics, seasonal variation in daylength.

2.The rapid spread of outdoor electric lighting across the globe over the past century has caused an unprecedented disruption to these natural light cycles. Artificial light is widespread in the environment, varying in intensity by several orders of magnitude from faint skyglow reflected from distant cities to direct illumination of urban and suburban vegetation.

3.In many cases artificial light in the nighttime environment is sufficiently bright to induce a physiological response in plants, affecting their phenology, growth form and resource allocation. The physiology, behaviour and ecology of herbivores and pollinators is also likely to be impacted by artificial light. Thus, understanding the ecological consequences of artificial light at night is critical to determine the full impact of human activity on ecosystems.

4.Synthesis. Understanding the impacts of artificial nighttime light on wild plants and natural vegetation requires linking the knowledge gained from over a century of experimental research on the impacts of light on plants in the laboratory and greenhouse with knowledge of the intensity, spatial distribution, spectral composition and timing of light in the nighttime environment. To understand fully the extent of these impacts requires conceptual models that can (i) characterise the highly heterogeneous nature of the nighttime light environment at a scale relevant to plant physiology, and (ii) scale physiological responses to predict impacts at the level of the whole plant, population, community and ecosystem.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, United Kimgdom; j.j.bennie(at)exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-0477 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1350
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Author Solano-Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M.
Title Numerical research on the effects the skyglow could have in phytochromes and RQE photoreceptors of plants Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal (up) J Environ Manage
Volume 209 Issue Pages 484-494
Keywords Plants; Skyglow
Abstract The increase of artificial light at night has a terrible impact on organisms with nightlife patterns such as a migration, nutrition, reproduction and collective interaction. Plants are not free from this issue as they have life cycle events occurring not only yearly but also daily. Such events relate to daytime variations with seasons in which the flowers of deciduous trees bloom and the leaves of certain trees fall off and change color. A response of plants to artificial light at night still remains poorly quantified; but recent scientific research suggest that skyglow can disturb plants processes. For instance, low levels of light affect deciduous plants, which shed their leaves as days grow short in the fall. In this paper we model skyglow considering the features of artificial light that can affect natural processes of plants during the night. A case-study was conducted to mimic skyglow effects in real location for which experimental data exist. In our numerical simulations we found that some lighting systems can have an effect on plant photoreceptors and affect the phenology of plants. Specifically, the lamps that emit the electromagnetic energy in a wide spectral range can have greater effect on the photosensitivity of the plants. We believe the results obtained here will motivate botanists to make a targeted experiment to verify or challenge our findings. If the night light can change plant behavior under some conditions, it can have significant implications in botany, biology, or even agriculture.
Address ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska Road 9, 845 03, Bratislava, Slovak Republic; Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynska Dolina, 842 48, Bratislava, Slovakia. Electronic address: kocifaj@savba.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29316469 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1854
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Author Joo, Y.; Fragoso, V.; Yon, F.; Baldwin, I.T.; Kim, S.-G.
Title The circadian clock component, LHY, tells a plant when to respond photosynthetically to light in nature Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Integrative Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal (up) J Integr Plant Biol
Volume 59 Issue 8 Pages 572-587
Keywords plants
Abstract The circadian clock is known to increase plant growth and fitness, and thought to prepare plants for photosynthesis at dawn and dusk; whether this happens in nature was unknown. We transformed the native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata to silence two core clock components, NaLHY (irLHY) and NaTOC1 (irTOC1). We characterized growth and light-and dark-adapted photosynthetic rates (Ac ) throughout a 24 h day in empty vector-transformed (EV), irLHY, and irTOC1 plants in the field, and in NaPhyA-and NaPhyB1-silenced plants in the glasshouse. The growth rates of irLHY plants were lower than those of EV plants in the field. While irLHY plants reduced Ac earlier at dusk, no differences between irLHY and EV plants were observed at dawn in the field. irLHY, but not EV plants, responded to light in the night by rapidly increasing Ac . Under controlled conditions, EV plants rapidly increased Ac in the day compared to dark-adapted plants at night; irLHY plants lost these time-dependent responses. The role of NaLHY in gating photosynthesis is independent of the light-dependent reactions and red light perceived by NaPhyA, but not NaPhyB1. In summary, the circadian clock allows plants not to respond photosynthetically to light at night by anticipating and gating red light-mediated in native tobacco.
Address Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knoll-Str. 8, D-07745, Jena, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1672-9072 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28429400 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1657
Permanent link to this record