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Author Buschmann, C.; Lichtenthaler, H.K.
Title Principles and characteristics of multi-colour fluorescence imaging of plants Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal (up) Journal of Plant Physiology
Volume 152 Issue 2-3 Pages 297-314
Keywords Plants
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0176-1617 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 652
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Author Lang, M.; Lichtenthaler, H.K.; Sowinska, M.; Heisel, F.; Miehé, J.A.
Title Fluorescence Imaging of Water and Temperature Stress in Plant Leaves Type Journal Article
Year 1996 Publication Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal (up) Journal of Plant Physiology
Volume 148 Issue 5 Pages 613-621
Keywords Plants
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ISSN 0176-1617 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 656
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Author Pocock, T.
Title Advanced lighting technology in controlled environment agriculture Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal (up) Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 83-94
Keywords Plants; Lighting
Abstract There is a recent awareness of the importance of plants in our everyday lives. Light is a requirement for plants and serves two important roles. It provides energy for growth and provides information that elicits plant responses including, among others, plant shape, pigmentation, nutritional content and resistance to stress. Light is paradoxical to plants, it is a requirement however, in excess it is damaging. Plants sense and interpret light through many families of photoreceptors and through the energy state of the photosynthetic apparatus. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are quickly replacing traditional light sources for human applications, and currently there is effort being put into tailoring these technology platforms for the plant community. Potential plant sensing pathways and the spectral effects on pigmentation and photochemistry in red lettuce are described.
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ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1383
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Author Maggi, E.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.
Title Trophic compensation stabilizes marine primary producers exposed to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal (up) Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 606 Issue Pages 1-5
Keywords Plants; Animals; Ecology
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread phenomenon along coastal areas. Despite increasing evidence of pervasive effects of ALAN on patterns of species distribution and abundance, the potential of this emerging threat to alter ecological processes in marine ecosystems has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show how exposure to white LED lighting, comparable to that experienced along local urbanized coasts, significantly enhanced the impact of grazing gastropods on epilithic microphytobenthos (MPB). ALAN increased both the photosynthetic biomass of MPB and the grazing pressure of gastropods, such that consumers compensated for the positive effect of night lighting on primary producers. Our results indicate that trophic interactions can provide a stabilizing compensatory mechanism against ALAN effects in natural food webs.
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ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2063
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Author Knop, E.; Zoller, L.; Ryser, R.; Gerpe, C.; Hörler, M.; Fontaine, C.
Title Artificial light at night as a new threat to pollination Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal (up) Nature
Volume 548 Issue 7666 Pages 206-209
Keywords Plants; Animals
Abstract Pollinators are declining worldwide and this has raised concerns for a parallel decline in the essential pollination service they provide to both crops and wild plants. Anthropogenic drivers linked to this decline include habitat changes, intensive agriculture, pesticides, invasive alien species, spread of pathogens and climate change1. Recently, the rapid global increase in artificial light at night has been proposed to be a new threat to terrestrial ecosystems; the consequences of this increase for ecosystem function are mostly unknown. Here we show that artificial light at night disrupts nocturnal pollination networks and has negative consequences for plant reproductive success. In artificially illuminated plant–pollinator communities, nocturnal visits to plants were reduced by 62% compared to dark areas. Notably, this resulted in an overall 13% reduction in fruit set of a focal plant even though the plant also received numerous visits by diurnal pollinators. Furthermore, by merging diurnal and nocturnal pollination sub-networks, we show that the structure of these combined networks tends to facilitate the spread of the negative consequences of disrupted nocturnal pollination to daytime pollinator communities. Our findings demonstrate that artificial light at night is a threat to pollination and that the negative effects of artificial light at night on nocturnal pollination are predicted to propagate to the diurnal community, thereby aggravating the decline of the diurnal community. We provide perspectives on the functioning of plant–pollinator communities, showing that nocturnal pollinators are not redundant to diurnal communities and increasing our understanding of the human-induced decline in pollinators and their ecosystem service.
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ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1696
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