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Author Reinberg, A.; Smolensky, M.H.; Touitou, Y.
Title The full moon as a synchronizer of circa-monthly biological rhythms: Chronobiologic perspectives based on multidisciplinary naturalistic research Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages 465-479
Keywords Moonlight; Commentary; Animals; Plants; Human Health
Abstract (down) Biological rhythmicity is presumed to be an advantageous genetic adaptation of fitness and survival value resulting from evolution of life forms in an environment that varies predictably-in-time during the 24 h, month, and year. The 24 h light/dark cycle is the prime synchronizer of circadian periodicities, and its modulation over the course of the year, in terms of daytime photoperiod length, is a prime synchronizer of circannual periodicities. Circadian and circannual rhythms have been the major research focus of most scientists. Circa-monthly rhythms triggered or synchronized by the 29.5 day lunar cycle of nighttime light intensity, or specifically the light of the full moon, although explored in waterborne and certain other species, have received far less study, perhaps because of associations with ancient mythology and/or an attitude naturalistic studies are of lesser merit than ones that entail molecular mechanisms. In this editorial, we cite our recent discovery through multidisciplinary naturalistic investigation of a highly integrated circadian, circa-monthly, and circannual time structure, synchronized by the natural ambient nyctohemeral, lunar, and annual light cycles, of the Peruvian apple cactus (C. peruvianus) flowering and reproductive processes that occur in close temporal coordination with like rhythms of the honey bee as its pollinator. This finding led us to explore the preservation of this integrated biological time structure, synchronized and/or triggered by environmental light cues and cycles, in the reproduction of other species, including Homo sapiens, and how the artificial light environment of today in which humans reside may be negatively affecting human reproduction efficiency.
Address a Unite de Chronobiologie , Fondation A de Rothschild , Paris cedex 19 , France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27019304 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1460
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Author Liu, J.D.; Goodspeed, D.; Sheng, Z.; Li, B.; Yang, Y.; Kliebenstein, D.J.; Braam, J.
Title Keeping the rhythm: light/dark cycles during postharvest storage preserve the tissue integrity and nutritional content of leafy plants Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol
Volume 15 Issue Pages 92
Keywords Plants
Abstract (down) BACKGROUND: The modular body structure of plants enables detached plant organs, such as postharvest fruits and vegetables, to maintain active responsiveness to environmental stimuli, including daily cycles of light and darkness. Twenty-four hour light/darkness cycles entrain plant circadian clock rhythms, which provide advantage to plants. Here, we tested whether green leafy vegetables gain longevity advantage by being stored under light/dark cycles designed to maintain biological rhythms. RESULTS: Light/dark cycles during postharvest storage improved several aspects of plant tissue performance comparable to that provided by refrigeration. Tissue integrity, green coloration, and chlorophyll content were generally enhanced by cycling of light and darkness compared to constant light or darkness during storage. In addition, the levels of the phytonutrient glucosinolates in kale and cabbage remained at higher levels over time when the leaf tissue was stored under light/dark cycles. CONCLUSIONS: Maintenance of the daily cycling of light and dark periods during postharvest storage may slow the decline of plant tissues, such as green leafy vegetables, improving not only appearance but also the health value of the crops through the maintenance of chlorophyll and phytochemical content after harvest.
Address Department of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, TX, 77005, USA. braam@rice.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25879637; PMCID:PMC4396971 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1458
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Author Breitler, J.-C.; Djerrab, D.; Leran, S.; Toniutti, L.; Guittin, C.; Severac, D.; Pratlong, M.; Dereeper, A.; Etienne, H.; Bertrand, B.
Title Full moonlight-induced circadian clock entrainment in Coffea arabica Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 24
Keywords Moonlight; Plants
Abstract (down) BACKGROUND: It is now well documented that moonlight affects the life cycle of invertebrates, birds, reptiles, and mammals. The lunisolar tide is also well-known to alter plant growth and development. However, although plants are known to be very photosensitive, few studies have been undertaken to explore the effect of moonlight on plant physiology. RESULTS: Here for the first time we report a massive transcriptional modification in Coffea arabica genes under full moonlight conditions, particularly at full moon zenith and 3 h later. Among the 3387 deregulated genes found in our study, the main core clock genes were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Moonlight also negatively influenced many genes involved in photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast machinery at the end of the night, suggesting that the full moon has a negative effect on primary photosynthetic machinery at dawn. Moreover, full moonlight promotes the transcription of major rhythmic redox genes and many heat shock proteins, suggesting that moonlight is perceived as stress. We confirmed this huge impact of weak light (less than 6 lx) on the transcription of circadian clock genes in controlled conditions mimicking full moonlight.
Address UMR IPME, Univ. Montpellier, CIRAD, IRD, F-34394, Montpellier, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31941456 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2817
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Author Massetti, L.
Title Assessing the impact of street lighting on Platanus x acerifolia phenology Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Urban Forestry & Urban Greening Abbreviated Journal Urban Forestry & Urban Greening
Volume 34 Issue Pages 71-77
Keywords Plants
Abstract (down) Autumn phenology is an important part of the tree growing season that is still poorly understood. In addition to the environmental factors that might affect its timing, there are artificial effects introduced by modern society that could interfere with it, such as the increasing use of artificial light to illuminate urban nights. This study investigates the relationship between outdoor public lighting and leaf senescence of Platanus x acerifolia that constitutes with more than 4000 individuals, and 6% of public greening in Florence, Italy. The difference in autumn phenology under two lighting conditions was assessed by analysing data collected in a real context, using a presence-absence protocol of green leaves on 283 trees during leaf fall season from 2014 to 2017. Trees were classified in two groups of different light exposure. In 2016-2017, data were also collected at Cascine park, the main green area within the city and darker than the monitored sites. According to the analysis, the percentage of trees with green leaves under luminaires was significantly higher than trees far from the luminaires, for all sites from mid-December to the end of January, and this effect was enhanced during 2016-2017 which was characterised by a colder winter. In the same year, the period of absence of green leaves at Cascine started at least 20 days earlier than the other sites. These findings should be taken into consideration by scientists because artificial light could affect autumn phenology and therefore the length of the vegetative season, and by urban greening and light managers during the design and management of public green spaces. Moreover, the presence-absence protocol proved to be suitable for collecting observations because it was easy to perform in a real context.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1618-8667 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1932
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Author Flowers, N.D.; Gibson, D.J.
Title Quantified effects of artificial versus natural nighttime lighting on the Eurasian grassesBothriochloa bladhii(Poaceae) andBothriochloa ischaemum(Poaceae) and the North American grassesPanicum virgatum(Poaceae) andSorghastrum nutans(Poaceae) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society Abbreviated Journal The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society
Volume 145 Issue 2 Pages 147-155
Keywords Plants
Abstract (down) Artificial nighttime lighting (light pollution) is increasing worldwide and may have undocumented consequences. In this study, we asked if artificial nighttime lighting affects the performance in monoculture of four grass species: the Eurasian Bothriochloa bladhii (Retz.) S.T. Blake (Poaceae), and Bothriochloa ischaemum (L.) Keng (Poaceae); and the North American Panicum virgatum (L.) (Poaceae), and Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash (Poaceae). We conducted a field pot experiment to test for the effects of artificial nighttime lighting and plant density on height, biomass, and leaf number. Height of the tallest individual per population was affected by separate interactions between species and density, light, and time. Final total biomass per individual biomass was increased under nighttime lighting, but more so at low density. Leaf number was increased by artificial nighttime lighting irrespective of species. These results suggest that artificial nighttime lighting may have previously undocumented influences on plant height, biomass, and leaf number within certain species. These findings warrant more in-depth studies into the role that artificial nighttime lighting can have on various plant species.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1095-5674 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1902
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