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Author Dzakovich, M.; Gómez, C.; Mitchell, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Tomatoes Grown with Light-emitting Diodes or High-pressure Sodium Supplemental Lights have Similar Fruit-quality Attributes Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal HortScience  
  Volume 50 Issue 10 Pages 1498-1502  
  Keywords Plants; greenhouse tomato production; HPS; LED; physicochemical testing; sensory panels; Solanum lycopersium; tomato; high-pressure sodium; agriculture; horticulture; light-emitting diode  
  Abstract (down) Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an attractive alternative to high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps for plant growth because of their energy-saving potential. However, the effects of supplementing broad-waveband solar light with narrow-waveband LED light on the sensory attributes of greenhouse-grown tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) are largely unknown. Three separate studies investigating the effect of supplemental light quantity and quality on physicochemical and organoleptic properties of greenhouse-grown tomato fruit were conducted over 4- or 5-month intervals during 2012 and 2013. Tomato cultivars Success, Komeett, and Rebelski were grown hydroponically within a high-wire trellising system in a glass-glazed greenhouse. Chromacity, Brix, titratable acidity, electrical conductivity (EC), and pH measurements of fruit extracts indicated plant response differences between lighting treatments. In sensory panels, tasters ranked tomatoes for color, acidity, and sweetness using an objective scale, whereas color, aroma, texture, sweetness, acidity, aftertaste, and overall approval were ranked using hedonic scales. By collecting both physicochemical as well as sensory data, this study was able to determine whether statistically significant physicochemical parameters of tomato fruit also reflected consumer perception of fruit quality. Sensory panels indicated that statistically significant physicochemical differences were not noticeable to tasters and that tasters engaged in blind testing could not discern between tomatoes from different supplemental lighting treatments or unsupplemented controls. Growers interested in reducing supplemental lighting energy consumption by using intracanopy LED (IC-LED) supplemental lighting need not be concerned that the quality of their tomato fruits will be negatively affected by narrow-band supplemental radiation at the intensities and wavelengths used in this study.  
  Address Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher American Society for Horticultural Science Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0018-5345 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1301  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Apostol, K.; Dumroese, R.K.; Pinto, J.R.; Davis, A.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Response of conifer species from three latitudinal populations to light spectra generated by light-emitting diodes and high-pressure sodium lamps Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Canadian Journal of Forest Research Abbreviated Journal Can. J. For. Res.  
  Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 1711-1719  
  Keywords plants  
  Abstract (down) Light-emitting diode (LED) technology shows promise for supplementing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in forest nurseries because of the potential reduction in energy consumption and an ability to supply discrete wavelengths to optimize seedling growth. Our objective was to examine the effects of light spectra supplied by LED and traditional high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on growth and physiology of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) and Picea engelmannii (Engelmann spruce) seedlings. We used three latitudinal sources for each species: British Columbia (BC), Idaho (ID), and New Mexico (NM). Container seedlings were grown for 17 weeks in the greenhouse under an 18-h photoperiod of ambient solar light supplemented with light delivered from HPS or LED. In general, seedlings grown under LED had significantly greater growth, gas exchange rates, and chlorophyll contents than those seedlings grown under HPS. The growth and physiological responses to supplemental lighting varied greatly among species and seed sources. Generally, LED-grown seedlings from BC had the greatest growth and tissue dry matter followed by ID and NM populations. Compared with HPS, the significant increase in seedling growth and concomitant energy savings with LED (29% energy consumption relative to HPS) demonstrates the promise of using LED as PAR supplemental lighting for container seedling production.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0045-5067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1250  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grenis, K.; Murphy, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Direct and indirect effects of light pollution on the performance of an herbivorous insect Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Insect Sci  
  Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 770-776  
  Keywords Animals; Plants  
  Abstract (down) Light pollution is a global disturbance with resounding impacts on a wide variety of organisms, but our understanding of these impacts is restricted to relatively few higher vertebrate species. We tested the direct effects of light pollution on herbivore performance as well as indirect effects mediated by host plant quality. We found that artificial light from streetlights alters plant toughness. Additionally, we found evidence of both direct and indirect effects of light pollution on the performance of an herbivorous insect, which indicates that streetlights can have cascading impacts on multiple trophic levels. Our novel findings suggest that light pollution can alter plant-insect interactions and thus may have important community-wide consequences.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1672-9609 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29425403 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1865  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kadman-Zahavi, A., & Ephrat, E. url  openurl
  Title The efficiency of different light sources in inducing spray carnation flowering Type Journal Article
  Year 1982 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 18 Issue Pages 159--167  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract (down) Light from Gro-lux fluorescent lamps, as a 4-h night break, was found to be more effective than incandescent light in promoting spray carnation flowering under natural daylight conditions. When the illuminations were applied for 4 h in the middle of the night, the effectiveness of a certain amount of radiant energy from incandescent light was found to be the same whether applied as intermittent or as continuous illumination.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2371  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Taylor, G.; Davies, W.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Control Of Leaf Growth Of Betula And Acer By Photoenvironment Type Journal Article
  Year 1985 Publication New Phytologist Abbreviated Journal New Phytol  
  Volume 101 Issue 2 Pages 259-268  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract (down) Leaf extension of one‐year‐old seedlings of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.), was measured using linear variable transducers (LVDTs) interfaced to a microcomputer. Birch and sycamore seedlings exhibited contrasting patterns of leaf extension during a diurnal cycle with a 16 h photoperiod. Birch leaves grew more rapidly when illuminated; growth during the photoperiod was approximately doubled when compared with growth in the dark. Mean relative growth rates ±SE at ‘lights‐on + 3 h’ and ‘lights‐off + 5 h’ were 0.0136 ± 0.0016 and 0.0066 ± 0.0005 h−1 respectively. In direct contrast, growth of sycamore leaves was increased when leaves were darkened; mean relative growth rates + SE at ‘lights‐on+3 h’ and ‘lights‐off + 5 h’ were 0.0056 ± 0.0005 and 0.0094 ± 0.0008 h‐1 respectively.

When leaves of birch and sycamore were darkened, increased leaf turgor was measured in both species, but only in sycamore was this higher night‐time turgor associated with a higher rate of leaf growth.

Cell wall extensibility (WEX), an indication of the ability of cell walls to loosen and extend irreversibly, and cell surface pH were assessed in darkened and illuminated leaves of both species. An increase in WEX was measured when birch leaves were illuminated (P≤ 0.001) and this was accompanied by a decline in cell surface pH (P≤ 0.001). However, when leaves of sycamore were illuminated, WEX declined (P≤ 005) and cell surface pH increased (P≤ 0.001).

The ability of these species to survive beneath a woodland canopy is discussed in relation to the cellular factors controlling their leaf growth.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-646X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1992  
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