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Author Myers, L.; Christian, K.; Kirchner, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Flowering responses of 48 lines of oilseed rape (Brassica spp.) to vernalization and daylength Type Journal Article
  Year 1982 Publication Australian Journal of Agricultural Research Abbreviated Journal Aust. J. Agric. Res.  
  Volume 33 Issue 6 Pages 927  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract (up) Forty-eight lines of Brassica spp, of diverse origins were grown in the glasshouse either under natural daylengths or daylengths extended to 16 h by artificial illumination. Plants were either unvernalized or had been subjected to 6 weeks at 8¦C day and 6¦C night temperatures as seedlings. Lines could be classified into two major groups, according to whether or not vernalization or long photoperiods were essential for 50% flowering within 21 weeks. In six lines, both vernalization and long days were essential for prompt flowering, while only five lines did not respond to either treatment. Strong interactions between lines and treatments were found in the number of leaves and subtended buds at flowering. The results show that a wide range of responses is obtainable from material currently available, offering considerabk, scope for adaptation to different environments.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-9409 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2369  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Arnott, J. T. url  openurl
  Title Growth Response of White and Englemann Spruce Seedlings to Extended Photoperiod Using Three Light Intensities Type Report
  Year 1982 Publication Technical Report: Pacific Forestry Centre Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract (up) Four seedlots of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and three of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry), covering a range of 10 degrees of latitude and a range of altitudes, were sown in BC/ CFS Styroblocks and grown in a heated greenhouse and an unheated shadehouse, using incandescent light to provide a 19-h photoperiod. Four intensities of lighting were used: 0, 100,200, and 400 Ix. A second experiment with the same seedlots was conducted in growth rooms that were programmed to evaluate the effect of low night temperature on seedling shoot growth when the photoperiod was extended to 19 h, using a light intensity of 200 Ix.

Shoot length of white and Engelmann spruce seedlings grown under an extended daylength of 100 Ix were significantly taller than the control (0 Ix). There were no significant differences in shoot length or weight among the three intensities of light used to extend the photoperiod for all seedlots except the southern latitude-low elevation population of Engelmann spruce. The more northern populations of white spruce and the high altitude populations of Engelmann spruce did not require light intensities higher than 100 Ix to maintain apical growth. Low night temperature (7°C) did produce significantly smaller seedlings than the warm night (1SoC) regime. However, terminal resting buds of seedlings grown under the cool night regime did not form any sooner than on those seedlings grown under warm nights.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2372  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tinus, R. W. url  openurl
  Title Effects of Extended Photoperiod on Southern Rocky Mountain Engelmann Spruce and Douglas-fir Type Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication Tree Planters' Notes Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract (up) Four sources of Engelmann spruce and two of Douglas-fir were grown under eight different extended photoperiod regimes. Incandescent light 1 minute of every 15 at night at 270 lux was more effective than continuous incandescent at 1200 lux or intermittent fluorescent at 950 lux at preventing bud dormancy and maintaining continuous height growth.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2368  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grubisic, M.; Singer, G.; Bruno, M.C.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Manfrin, A.; Monaghan, M.T.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A pigment composition analysis reveals community changes in pre-established stream periphyton under low-level artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Limnologica Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 69 Issue Pages 55-58  
  Keywords Plants; Ecology  
  Abstract (up) Freshwaters are increasingly exposed to artificial light at night (ALAN), yet the consequences for aquatic primary producers remain largely unknown. We used stream-side flumes to expose three-week-old periphyton to LED light. Pigment composition was used to infer community changes in LED-lit and control periphyton before and after three weeks of treatment. The proportion of diatoms/chrysophytes decreased (14%) and cyanobacteria increased (17%) in lit periphyton in spring. This may reduce periphyton nutritional quality in artificially-lit waters.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0075-9511 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1791  
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Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Cruse, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.; Lewis, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night causes top-down and bottom-up trophic effects on invertebrate populations Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol  
  Volume 55 Issue 6 Pages 2698-2706  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants  
  Abstract (up) Globally, many ecosystems are exposed to artificial light at night. Nighttime lighting has direct biological impacts on species at all trophic levels. However, the effects of artificial light on biotic interactions remain, for the most part, to be determined.

We exposed experimental mesocosms containing combinations of grassland plants and invertebrate herbivores and predators to illumination at night over a 3‐year period to simulate conditions under different common forms of street lighting.

We demonstrate both top‐down (predation‐controlled) and bottom‐up (resource‐controlled) impacts of artificial light at night in grassland communities. The impacts on invertebrate herbivore abundance were wavelength‐dependent and mediated via other trophic levels.

White LED lighting decreased the abundance of a generalist herbivore mollusc by 55% in the presence of a visual predator, but not in its absence, while monochromatic amber light (with a peak wavelength similar to low‐pressure sodium lighting) decreased abundance of a specialist herbivore aphid (by 17%) by reducing the cover and flower abundance of its main food plant in the system. Artificial white light also significantly increased the food plant's foliar carbon to nitrogen ratio.

We conclude that exposure to artificial light at night can trigger ecological effects spanning trophic levels, and that the nature of such impacts depends on the wavelengths emitted by the lighting technology employed.

Policy implications. Our results confirm that artificial light at night, at illuminance levels similar to roadside vegetation, can have population effects mediated by both top‐down and bottom‐up effects on ecosystems. Given the increasing ubiquity of light pollution at night, these impacts may be widespread in the environment. These results underline the importance of minimizing ecosystem disruption by reducing light pollution in natural and seminatural ecosystems.
 
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2086  
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