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Author Caffarra, A.; Donnelly, A.
Title The ecological significance of phenology in four different tree species: effects of light and temperature on bud burst Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol
Volume 55 Issue 5 Pages 711-721
Keywords Plants
Abstract The process of adaptation is the result of stabilising selection caused by two opposite forces: protection against an unfavourable season (survival adaptation), and effective use of growing resources (capacity adaptation). As plant species have evolved different life strategies based on different trade offs between survival and capacity adaptations, different phenological responses are also expected among species. The aim of this study was to compare budburst responses of two opportunistic species (Betula pubescens, and Salix x smithiana) with that of two long-lived, late successional species (Fagus sylvatica and Tilia cordata) and consider their ecological significance. Thus, we performed a series of experiments whereby temperature and photoperiod were manipulated during dormancy. T. cordata and F. sylvatica showed low rates of budburst, high chilling requirements and responsiveness to light intensity, while B. pubescens and S. x smithiana had high rates of budburst, low chilling requirements and were not affected by light intensity. In addition, budburst in B. pubescens and S. x smithiana was more responsive to high forcing temperatures than in T. cordata and F. sylvatica. These results suggest that the timing of growth onset in B. pubescens and S. x smithiana (opportunistic) is regulated through a less conservative mechanism than in T. cordata and F. sylvatica (long-lived, late successional), and that these species trade a higher risk of frost damage for the opportunity of vigorous growth at the beginning of spring, before canopy closure. This information should be considered when assessing the impacts of climate change on vegetation or developing phenological models.
Address (up) Department of Botany, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. amelia.caffarra@gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21113629 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1675
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Author Margot, J.-L.
Title Insufficient Evidence of Purported Lunar Effect on Pollination in Ephedra Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 30 Issue 5 Pages 454-456
Keywords Animals; Plants; Moonlight
Abstract It has been suggested that the timing of pollination in Ephedra foeminea coincides with the full moon in July. The implication is that the plant can detect the full moon through light or gravity and that this trait is an evolutionary adaptation that aids the navigation by pollinating insects. Here we show that there are insufficient data to make such a claim, and we predict that pollinations of E. foeminea do not in general coincide with the full moon.
Address (up) Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USADepartment of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA jlm@astro.ucla.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26316347 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1557
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Author Rydin, C; Bolinder, K
Title Moonlight pollination in the gymnosperm Ephedra (Gnetales) Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol. Lett.
Volume 11 Issue 4 Pages 20140993
Keywords Plants; anemophily; entomophily; lunar phases; nocturnal insects; lunar cycle; light at night; Ephedra; Ephedra distachya; pollination
Abstract Most gymnosperms are wind-pollinated, but some are insect-pollinated, and in Ephedra (Gnetales), both wind pollination and insect pollination occur. Little is, however, known about mechanisms and evolution of pollination syndromes in gymnosperms. Based on four seasons of field studies, we show an unexpected correlation between pollination and the phases of the moon in one of our studied species, Ephedra foeminea. It is pollinated by dipterans and lepidopterans, most of them nocturnal, and its pollination coincides with the full moon of July. This may be adaptive in two ways. Many nocturnal insects navigate using the moon. Further, the spectacular reflection of the full-moonlight in the pollination drops is the only apparent means of nocturnal attraction of insects in these plants. In the sympatric but wind-pollinated Ephedra distachya, pollination is not correlated to the full moon but occurs at approximately the same dates every year. The lunar correlation has probably been lost in most species of Ephedra subsequent an evolutionary shift to wind pollination in the clade. When the services of insects are no longer needed for successful pollination, the adaptive value of correlating pollination with the full moon is lost, and conceivably also the trait.
Address (up) Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm 106 91, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1143
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Author Chaves, I.; Pokorny, R.; Byrdin, M.; Hoang, N.; Ritz, T.; Brettel, K.; Essen, L.-O.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Batschauer, A.; Ahmad, M.
Title The cryptochromes: blue light photoreceptors in plants and animals Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Annual Review of Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Plant Biol
Volume 62 Issue Pages 335-364
Keywords Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism; Animals; Cryptochromes/chemistry/classification/*physiology; DNA Repair; Deoxyribodipyrimidine Photo-Lyase/chemistry/classification/physiology; Homing Behavior; Insects/physiology; *Light Signal Transduction; Magnetics; Mice; Oxidation-Reduction; Phosphorylation/physiology; Plants/*metabolism; blue light
Abstract Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, where they play key roles in growth and development. Subsequently identified in prokaryotes, archaea, and many eukaryotes, cryptochromes function in the animal circadian clock and are proposed as magnetoreceptors in migratory birds. Cryptochromes are closely structurally related to photolyases, evolutionarily ancient flavoproteins that catalyze light-dependent DNA repair. Here, we review the structural, photochemical, and molecular properties of cry-DASH, plant, and animal cryptochromes in relation to biological signaling mechanisms and uncover common features that may contribute to better understanding the function of cryptochromes in diverse systems including in man.
Address (up) Department of Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. i.chaves@erasmusmc.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1543-5008 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:21526969 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 341
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Author Dzakovich, M.; Gómez, C.; Mitchell, C.
Title Tomatoes Grown with Light-emitting Diodes or High-pressure Sodium Supplemental Lights have Similar Fruit-quality Attributes Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal HortScience
Volume 50 Issue 10 Pages 1498-1502
Keywords Plants; greenhouse tomato production; HPS; LED; physicochemical testing; sensory panels; Solanum lycopersium; tomato; high-pressure sodium; agriculture; horticulture; light-emitting diode
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an attractive alternative to high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps for plant growth because of their energy-saving potential. However, the effects of supplementing broad-waveband solar light with narrow-waveband LED light on the sensory attributes of greenhouse-grown tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) are largely unknown. Three separate studies investigating the effect of supplemental light quantity and quality on physicochemical and organoleptic properties of greenhouse-grown tomato fruit were conducted over 4- or 5-month intervals during 2012 and 2013. Tomato cultivars Success, Komeett, and Rebelski were grown hydroponically within a high-wire trellising system in a glass-glazed greenhouse. Chromacity, Brix, titratable acidity, electrical conductivity (EC), and pH measurements of fruit extracts indicated plant response differences between lighting treatments. In sensory panels, tasters ranked tomatoes for color, acidity, and sweetness using an objective scale, whereas color, aroma, texture, sweetness, acidity, aftertaste, and overall approval were ranked using hedonic scales. By collecting both physicochemical as well as sensory data, this study was able to determine whether statistically significant physicochemical parameters of tomato fruit also reflected consumer perception of fruit quality. Sensory panels indicated that statistically significant physicochemical differences were not noticeable to tasters and that tasters engaged in blind testing could not discern between tomatoes from different supplemental lighting treatments or unsupplemented controls. Growers interested in reducing supplemental lighting energy consumption by using intracanopy LED (IC-LED) supplemental lighting need not be concerned that the quality of their tomato fruits will be negatively affected by narrow-band supplemental radiation at the intensities and wavelengths used in this study.
Address (up) Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Society for Horticultural Science Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0018-5345 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1301
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