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Author Liu, Z.; Lv, Y.; Ding, R.; Chen, X.; Pu, G.
Title Light Pollution Changes the Toxicological Effects of Cadmium on Microbial Community Structure and Function Associated with Leaf Litter Decomposition Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci
Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Plants; Illumina Sequencing; artificial light at night; cadmium pollution; extracellular enzyme activities; litter decomposition; microbial biodiversity
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN/A) can not only alter the behavior and communication of biological organisms, it can also interact with other stressors. Despite its widespread use and the numerous potential ecological effects, little is known about the impact of ALAN on plant litter decomposition under cadmium (Cd) pollution in aquatic ecosystems. In an indoor microcosm experiment, we tested single and combined effects of ALAN and Cd on the activities and community structure of fungi associated with plant litter. The results showed that ALAN and/or Cd can change both water and leaf litter characteristics. ALAN exposure not only altered fungal community structure and their correlations, but also increased the activities of alkaline phosphatase, beta-glucosidase, and cellobiohydrolase. The leaf litter decomposition rate was 71% higher in the A-Cd treatment than that in the N-Cd treatment, indicating that the presence of ALAN weakened the negative impact of Cd on leaf litter decomposition. These results suggested that ALAN exposure mitigated the negative effect of Cd on leaf litter decomposition, contributing to the duel effect of ALAN on leaf litter decomposition. Overall, the results expand our understanding of ALAN on the environment and highlight the contribution of ALAN to Cd toxicity in aquatic ecosystems.
Address (up) Guangxi Key Laboratory of Plant Conservation and Restoration Ecology in Karst Terrain, Guangxi Institute of Botany, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guilin 541006, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31936535 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2818
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Author Solano-Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M.
Title Numerical research on the effects the skyglow could have in phytochromes and RQE photoreceptors of plants Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage
Volume 209 Issue Pages 484-494
Keywords Plants; Skyglow
Abstract The increase of artificial light at night has a terrible impact on organisms with nightlife patterns such as a migration, nutrition, reproduction and collective interaction. Plants are not free from this issue as they have life cycle events occurring not only yearly but also daily. Such events relate to daytime variations with seasons in which the flowers of deciduous trees bloom and the leaves of certain trees fall off and change color. A response of plants to artificial light at night still remains poorly quantified; but recent scientific research suggest that skyglow can disturb plants processes. For instance, low levels of light affect deciduous plants, which shed their leaves as days grow short in the fall. In this paper we model skyglow considering the features of artificial light that can affect natural processes of plants during the night. A case-study was conducted to mimic skyglow effects in real location for which experimental data exist. In our numerical simulations we found that some lighting systems can have an effect on plant photoreceptors and affect the phenology of plants. Specifically, the lamps that emit the electromagnetic energy in a wide spectral range can have greater effect on the photosensitivity of the plants. We believe the results obtained here will motivate botanists to make a targeted experiment to verify or challenge our findings. If the night light can change plant behavior under some conditions, it can have significant implications in botany, biology, or even agriculture.
Address (up) ICA, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska Road 9, 845 03, Bratislava, Slovak Republic; Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynska Dolina, 842 48, Bratislava, Slovakia. Electronic address: kocifaj@savba.sk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29316469 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1854
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Author Bunning, E.; Moser, I.
Title Interference of moonlight with the photoperiodic measurement of time by plants, and their adaptive reaction Type Journal Article
Year 1969 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 62 Issue 4 Pages 1018-1022
Keywords Plants; Moonlight
Abstract Threshold values of photoperiodic time-measurements correspond approximately to moonlight intensities. Experiments with Glycine and Euglena reveal that this is also the threshold value for synchronization of the circadian cycle. Saturation of this reaction is reached with 10 lx in 12:12 hr light-dark cycles. Thus, moonlight might disturb time measurement.In Glycine, Arachis, and Trifolium the intensity of the light coming from the moon to the upper surface of the leaf is reduced by circadian leaf movement to values between 5 and 20 per cent (or even less than 5 per cent) of full-moon light intensity. Such a reduction eliminates the disturbing effects of moonlight. This finding indicates that leaf movements have an adaptive value of the kind that Darwin sought to identify. It also indicates that the behavior of the upper leaf epidermis as a “sense organ for light”(13) has an adaptive value.In the short-day plants Perilla ocymoides and Chenopodium amaranticolor, a specific photoperiodic phenomenon was found that counteracts the disturbing effect of moonlight. Here light intensities similar to those of moonlight, introduced during the night, promote flowering instead of inhibiting it.
Address (up) Institute Of Biology, University Of Tubingen, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16591742; PMCID:PMC223607 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3035
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Author Ehlert, K.; Piepenbring, M.; Kollar, A.
Title Ascospore release in apple scab underlies infrared sensation Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Fungal Biology Abbreviated Journal Fungal Biol
Volume 121 Issue 12 Pages 1054-1062
Keywords Plants
Abstract The agent of apple scab disease (Venturia inaequalis) is the most common pathogen in apple cultivation. Its ascospores are released in spring, mainly during daylight hours and triggered by rain events. To investigate the causes of diurnal rhythm of ascospore dissemination of the apple scab fungus ascospore releases were examined continuously with spore traps in the orchard and with laboratory assays. One of the spore traps was illuminated at night with different light sources in each year during 2011-2015. The laboratory assays were performed with different light sources with varying wavelengths and intensities. In field and laboratory conditions only light including infrared radiation stimulated ascospore release, but not with light in the visible spectrum only. Artificial illumination during night was correlated with an increase of up to 46 % of ascospores released overnight in the field. We proved that infrared radiation induces V. inaequalis to release its spores. This is the first report in which spore discharge could be stimulated during night under field conditions.
Address (up) Julius Kuehn-Institut, Federal Research Center for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Plant Protection in Fruit Crops and Viticulture, Schwabenheimer Strasse 101, 69221 Dossenheim, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1878-6146 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29122177 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2454
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Author Schroer, S.; Hölker, F.
Title Impact of Lighting on Flora and Fauna Type Book Chapter
Year 2016 Publication Handbook of Advanced Lighting Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-33
Keywords Ecology; Lighting; Artificial light at night; ALAN; Plants; Animals; review
Abstract Technology, especially artificial light at night (ALAN), often has unexpected impacts on the environment. This chapter addresses both the perception of light by various organisms and the impact of ALAN on flora and fauna. The responses to ALAN are subdivided into the effects of light intensity, color spectra, and duration and timing of illumination. The ways organisms perceive light can be as variable as the habitats they live in. ALAN often interferes with natural light information. It is rarely neutral and has significant impacts beyond human perception. For example, UV light reflection of generative plant parts or the direction of light is used by many organisms as information for foraging, finding spawning sites, or communication. Contemporary outdoor lighting often lacks sustainable planning, even though the protection of species, habitat, and human well-being could be improved by adopting simple technical measures. The increasing use of ALAN with high intensities in the blue part of the spectrum, e.g., fluorescent light and LEDs, is discussed as a critical trend. Blue light is a major circadian signal in higher vertebrates and can substantially impact the orientation of organisms such as numerous insect species. A better understanding of how various types and sources of artificial light, and how organisms perceive ALAN, will be an important step towards more sustainable lighting. Such knowledge is the basis for sustainable lighting planning and the development of solutions to protect biodiversity from the effects of outdoor lighting. Maps that describe the rapid changes in ALAN are urgently needed. In addition, measures are required to reduce the increasing use and intensity of ALAN in more remote areas as signaling thresholds in flora and fauna at night are often close to moonlight intensity and far below streetlight levels.
Address (up) Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany; schroer(at)igb-berlin.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-3-319-00295-8 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1470
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