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Author (down) Myers, L.; Christian, K.; Kirchner, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Flowering responses of 48 lines of oilseed rape (Brassica spp.) to vernalization and daylength Type Journal Article
  Year 1982 Publication Australian Journal of Agricultural Research Abbreviated Journal Aust. J. Agric. Res.  
  Volume 33 Issue 6 Pages 927  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Forty-eight lines of Brassica spp, of diverse origins were grown in the glasshouse either under natural daylengths or daylengths extended to 16 h by artificial illumination. Plants were either unvernalized or had been subjected to 6 weeks at 8¦C day and 6¦C night temperatures as seedlings. Lines could be classified into two major groups, according to whether or not vernalization or long photoperiods were essential for 50% flowering within 21 weeks. In six lines, both vernalization and long days were essential for prompt flowering, while only five lines did not respond to either treatment. Strong interactions between lines and treatments were found in the number of leaves and subtended buds at flowering. The results show that a wide range of responses is obtainable from material currently available, offering considerabk, scope for adaptation to different environments.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-9409 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2369  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Moore, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Relative Length of Day and Night Type Journal Article
  Year 1920 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 234-237  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2407  
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Author (down) Matzke, E. B. url  openurl
  Title The Effect of Street Lights in Delaying Leaf-Fall in Certain Trees Type Journal Article
  Year 1936 Publication American Journal of Botany Abbreviated Journal Amer. J. of Botany  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 446-452  
  Keywords Plants; trees; Carolina poplar; Populus canadensis; London plane; Platanus acerifolia; sycamore; Platanus occidentalis; crack willow; Salix fragilis; New York; New York City  
  Abstract Street lights in the City of New York cause a retention of the leaves of certain trees: Carolina poplar (Populus canadensis), London plane (Platanus acerifolia), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), and crack willow (Salix fragilis). Illuminated portions of a tree retain their leaves; shaded portions of the same tree do not. One side of a tree, or the lower part, may thus have numerous leaves, while the other side, and the upper part, may be entirely devoid of foliage. A relatively weak light, at a distance of as much as 45 feet from the tip of the nearest branch, may cause retention of numerous leaves. Light intensity as low as 1 foot candle, or less, may be effective. Some leaves may be retained at least a month, others more than that, beyond the normal season. The orientation of the light with respect to the tree – i.e., north, east, south, and west – is not significant. In Populus canadensis all of the leaves ultimately fall, abscission apparently taking place at the base of the petiole. In Platanus acerifolia and Platanus occidentalis some of the leaves are retained until killed by low temperature; then some of them break off above the base of the petiole. Leaves of the Populus and Platanus species discussed remain green unusually long when receiving additional illumination. Leaves of these same trees do not emerge from the buds earlier in the spring as a result of the additional illumination.  
  Address n/a  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher JSTOR Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9122 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1394  
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Author (down) Matsuda, R.; Yamano, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of spectral distribution and photosynthetic photon flux density for overnight LED light irradiation on tomato seedling growth and leaf injury Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae  
  Volume 198 Issue Pages 363-369  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1387  
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Author (down) Massetti, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessing the impact of street lighting on Platanus x acerifolia phenology Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Urban Forestry & Urban Greening Abbreviated Journal Urban Forestry & Urban Greening  
  Volume 34 Issue Pages 71-77  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Autumn phenology is an important part of the tree growing season that is still poorly understood. In addition to the environmental factors that might affect its timing, there are artificial effects introduced by modern society that could interfere with it, such as the increasing use of artificial light to illuminate urban nights. This study investigates the relationship between outdoor public lighting and leaf senescence of Platanus x acerifolia that constitutes with more than 4000 individuals, and 6% of public greening in Florence, Italy. The difference in autumn phenology under two lighting conditions was assessed by analysing data collected in a real context, using a presence-absence protocol of green leaves on 283 trees during leaf fall season from 2014 to 2017. Trees were classified in two groups of different light exposure. In 2016-2017, data were also collected at Cascine park, the main green area within the city and darker than the monitored sites. According to the analysis, the percentage of trees with green leaves under luminaires was significantly higher than trees far from the luminaires, for all sites from mid-December to the end of January, and this effect was enhanced during 2016-2017 which was characterised by a colder winter. In the same year, the period of absence of green leaves at Cascine started at least 20 days earlier than the other sites. These findings should be taken into consideration by scientists because artificial light could affect autumn phenology and therefore the length of the vegetative season, and by urban greening and light managers during the design and management of public green spaces. Moreover, the presence-absence protocol proved to be suitable for collecting observations because it was easy to perform in a real context.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1618-8667 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1932  
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