|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up) Woolsey, S.; Capelli, F.; Gonser, T.; Hoehn, E.; Hostmann, M.; Junker, B.; Paetzold, A.; Roulier, C.; Schweizer, S.; Tiegs, S.D.; Tockner, K.; Weber, C.; Peter, A.
Title A strategy to assess river restoration success Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal Freshwater Biol
Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 752-769
Keywords Plants; evaluation guidelines; socio-economics; indicators; floodplain; decision making; bioassessment; sustainability; biodiversity
Abstract 1. Elaborate restoration attempts are underway worldwide to return human-impacted rivers to more natural conditions. Assessing the outcome of river restoration projects is vital for adaptive management, evaluating project efficiency, optimising future programmes and gaining public acceptance. An important reason why assessment is often omitted is lack of appropriate guidelines.

2. Here we present guidelines for assessing river restoration success. They are based on a total of 49 indicators and 13 specific objectives elaborated for the restoration of low- to mid-order rivers in Switzerland. Most of these objectives relate to ecological attributes of rivers, but socio-economic aspects are also considered.

3. A strategy is proposed according to which a set of indicators is selected from the total of 49 indicators to ensure that indicators match restoration objectives and measures, and that the required effort for survey and analysis of indicators is appropriate to the project budget.

4. Indicator values are determined according to methods described in detailed method sheets. Restoration success is evaluated by comparing indicator values before and after restoration measures have been undertaken. To this end, values are first standardised on a dimensionless scale ranging from 0 to 1, then averaged across different indicators for a given project objective, and finally assigned to one of five overall success categories.

5. To illustrate the application of this scheme, a case study on the Thur River, Switzerland, is presented. Seven indicators were selected to meet a total of five project objectives. The project was successful in achieving ‘provision of high recreational value’, ‘lateral connectivity’ and ‘vertical connectivity’ but failed to meet the objectives ‘morphological and hydraulic variability’ and ‘near natural abundance and diversity of fauna’. Results from this assessment allowed us to identify potential deficits and gaps in the restoration project. To gain information on the sensitivity of the assessment scheme would require a set of complementary indicators for each restoration objective.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 662
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Xu, C.; Wang, H.-J.; Yu, Q.; Wang, H.-Z.; Liang, X.-M.; Liu, M.; Jeppesen, E.
Title Effects of Artificial LED Light on the Growth of Three Submerged Macrophyte Species during the Low-Growth Winter Season: Implications for Macrophyte Restoration in Small Eutrophic Lakes Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Water Abbreviated Journal Water
Volume 11 Issue 7 Pages 1512
Keywords Plants
Abstract Eutrophication of lakes is becoming a global environmental problem, leading to, among other things, rapid reproduction of phytoplankton, increased turbidity, loss of submerged macrophytes, and the recovery of these plants following nutrient loading reduction is often delayed. Artificial light supplement could potentially be a useful method to help speeding up recovery. In this study, three common species of submerged macrophytes, Vallisneria natans, Myriophyllum spicatum and Ceratophyllum demersum, were exposed to three LED light treatments (blue, red and white) and shaded (control) for 100 days (from 10 November 2016 to 18 January 2017) in 12 tanks holding 800 L of water. All the three LED light treatments promoted growth of the three macrophyte species in terms of shoot number, length and dry mass. The three light treatments differed in their effects on the growth of the plants; generally, the red light had the strongest promoting effects, followed by blue and white. The differences in light effects may be caused by the different photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of the lights, as indicated by an observed relationship of PPFD with the growth variables. The three species also responded differently to the light treatments, V. natans and C. demersum showing higher growth than M. spicatum. Our findings demonstrate that artificial light supplement in the low-growth winter season can promote growth and recovery of submerged macrophytes and hence potentially enhance their competitiveness against phytoplankton in the following spring. More studies, however, are needed to elucidate if LED light treatment is a potential restoration method in small lakes, when the growth of submerged macrophytes are delayed following a sufficiently large external nutrient loading reduction for a shift to a clear macrophyte state to have a potential to occur. Our results may also be of relevance when elucidating the role of artificial light from cities on the ecosystem functioning of lakes in urban areas.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2073-4441 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2606
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Zhang, B.; Zhang, H.; Jing, Q.; Wang, J.
Title Light pollution on the growth, physiology and chlorophyll fluorescence response of landscape plant perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators
Volume 115 Issue Pages 106448
Keywords Plants
Abstract Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was commonly used for urban green planting such as lawns, which was not only affected by sunlight, but also by light pollution caused by night artificial lighting. In order to see the ryegrass growth, physiological characters and chlorophyll fluorescence response to light pollution and provide the suitable lighting time, 6 different artificial lighting times (24/0 h, 22/2 h, 20/4 h, 18/6 h, 16/8 h and 14/10 h) were conducted in growth chambers. There were significant systematic differences in perennial ryegrass growth characters in seed germination rate, leaf length (LL) and leaf weight (LW) (F = 47.99, 28.34, 13.47, respectively; P < 0.01) while under 16/8h lighting time treatment which had the highest values and the increasing lighting time decreased the growth. It had the best effect under 16/8h lighting time treatment on leaf physiological reactions and also significant. The maximum curvature point temperature (TCC) was significant different (F = 28.08, P < 0.01). The relative variable fluorescence differences at 2 ms (VJ) was increased with the lighting time increased (F = 20.25, P < 0.01). The results of reaction center (RC) of PSII under 6 lighting times also had significant differences. For the result of the yield and efficiency of electron transport chain (ETC), Fv/Fm (φP0), ψ0 and φE0 showed the significantly increased trend with the lighting time decreased while the φD0 was decreased. The shape of the OJIP curves was sensitive to the lighting times which showed that with the increasing lighting times the chlorophyll fluorescence intensity changed and shifted the fluorescence curve lower. Leaf light-response curves (LC) were also significant under 6 lighting times. Significant positive correlations were found between leaf physiological characters (SP, SC, Chl a, Chl b, Chl a + b, WP and TCC) and J-I-P test chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (PIABS, ABS/RC and TR0/RC) except ET0/RC while the correlation with DI0/RC was significant negative. There were significant positive correlations between leaf physiological characters (SP, SC, Chl a, Chl b, Chl a + b, WP and TCC) and φP0, φE0, ψ0 while the relationships with φD0 were significantly negative. Nighttime artificial lighting acted as a depressor of the fitness of photosynthesis and growth characters, via the changing of the photosynthetic apparatus.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2905
Permanent link to this record