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Author (up) Brelsford, CC; Robson, TM url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blue light advances bud burst in branches of three deciduous tree species under short-day conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Trees Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 1157-1164  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract During spring, utilising multiple cues allow tree species from temperate and boreal regions to coordinate their bud burst and leaf out, at the right moment to capitalise on favourable conditions for photosynthesis. Whilst the effect of blue light (400–500 nm) has been shown to increase percentage bud burst of axillary shoots of Rosa sp., the effects of blue light on spring-time bud burst of deciduous tree species have not previously been reported. We tested the hypotheses that blue light would advance spring bud burst in tree species, and that late-successional species would respond more than early-successional species, whose bud burst is primarily determined by temperature. The bud development of Alnus glutinosa, Betula pendula, and Quercus robur branches, cut from dormant trees, was monitored under two light treatments of equal photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400–700 nm) and temperature, either with or without blue light, under controlled environmental conditions. In the presence of blue light, the mean time required to reach 50% bud burst was reduced by 3.3 days in Betula pendula, 6 days in Alnus glutinosa, and 6.3 days in Quercus robur. This result highlights the potential of the blue region of the solar spectrum to be used as an extra cue that could help plants to regulate their spring phenology, alongside photoperiod and temperature. Understanding how plants combine photoreceptor-mediated cues with other environmental cues such as temperature to control phenology is essential if we are to accurately predict how tree species might respond to climate change.  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1847  
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Author (up) Buchar, J.; Thaler, K. openurl 
  Title Ãœber Pardosa atomaria (C .L. KOCH) und andere Pardosa-Arten an Geröllüfern in Süd- und Mitteleuropa. Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Linzer Biologischer Beitrag Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 445–465  
  Keywords Plants  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 659  
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Author (up) Bunning, E.; Moser, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Interference of moonlight with the photoperiodic measurement of time by plants, and their adaptive reaction Type Journal Article
  Year 1969 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 62 Issue 4 Pages 1018-1022  
  Keywords Plants; Moonlight  
  Abstract Threshold values of photoperiodic time-measurements correspond approximately to moonlight intensities. Experiments with Glycine and Euglena reveal that this is also the threshold value for synchronization of the circadian cycle. Saturation of this reaction is reached with 10 lx in 12:12 hr light-dark cycles. Thus, moonlight might disturb time measurement.In Glycine, Arachis, and Trifolium the intensity of the light coming from the moon to the upper surface of the leaf is reduced by circadian leaf movement to values between 5 and 20 per cent (or even less than 5 per cent) of full-moon light intensity. Such a reduction eliminates the disturbing effects of moonlight. This finding indicates that leaf movements have an adaptive value of the kind that Darwin sought to identify. It also indicates that the behavior of the upper leaf epidermis as a “sense organ for light”(13) has an adaptive value.In the short-day plants Perilla ocymoides and Chenopodium amaranticolor, a specific photoperiodic phenomenon was found that counteracts the disturbing effect of moonlight. Here light intensities similar to those of moonlight, introduced during the night, promote flowering instead of inhibiting it.  
  Address Institute Of Biology, University Of Tubingen, Germany  
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  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:16591742; PMCID:PMC223607 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3035  
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Author (up) Buschmann, C.; Lichtenthaler, H.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Principles and characteristics of multi-colour fluorescence imaging of plants Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Plant Physiology  
  Volume 152 Issue 2-3 Pages 297-314  
  Keywords Plants  
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  ISSN 0176-1617 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 652  
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Author (up) Caffarra, A.; Donnelly, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The ecological significance of phenology in four different tree species: effects of light and temperature on bud burst Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol  
  Volume 55 Issue 5 Pages 711-721  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract The process of adaptation is the result of stabilising selection caused by two opposite forces: protection against an unfavourable season (survival adaptation), and effective use of growing resources (capacity adaptation). As plant species have evolved different life strategies based on different trade offs between survival and capacity adaptations, different phenological responses are also expected among species. The aim of this study was to compare budburst responses of two opportunistic species (Betula pubescens, and Salix x smithiana) with that of two long-lived, late successional species (Fagus sylvatica and Tilia cordata) and consider their ecological significance. Thus, we performed a series of experiments whereby temperature and photoperiod were manipulated during dormancy. T. cordata and F. sylvatica showed low rates of budburst, high chilling requirements and responsiveness to light intensity, while B. pubescens and S. x smithiana had high rates of budburst, low chilling requirements and were not affected by light intensity. In addition, budburst in B. pubescens and S. x smithiana was more responsive to high forcing temperatures than in T. cordata and F. sylvatica. These results suggest that the timing of growth onset in B. pubescens and S. x smithiana (opportunistic) is regulated through a less conservative mechanism than in T. cordata and F. sylvatica (long-lived, late successional), and that these species trade a higher risk of frost damage for the opportunity of vigorous growth at the beginning of spring, before canopy closure. This information should be considered when assessing the impacts of climate change on vegetation or developing phenological models.  
  Address Department of Botany, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. amelia.caffarra@gmail.com  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21113629 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1675  
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