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Author (up) Dzakovich, M.; Gómez, C.; Mitchell, C.
Title Tomatoes Grown with Light-emitting Diodes or High-pressure Sodium Supplemental Lights have Similar Fruit-quality Attributes Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal HortScience
Volume 50 Issue 10 Pages 1498-1502
Keywords Plants; greenhouse tomato production; HPS; LED; physicochemical testing; sensory panels; Solanum lycopersium; tomato; high-pressure sodium; agriculture; horticulture; light-emitting diode
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an attractive alternative to high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps for plant growth because of their energy-saving potential. However, the effects of supplementing broad-waveband solar light with narrow-waveband LED light on the sensory attributes of greenhouse-grown tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) are largely unknown. Three separate studies investigating the effect of supplemental light quantity and quality on physicochemical and organoleptic properties of greenhouse-grown tomato fruit were conducted over 4- or 5-month intervals during 2012 and 2013. Tomato cultivars Success, Komeett, and Rebelski were grown hydroponically within a high-wire trellising system in a glass-glazed greenhouse. Chromacity, Brix, titratable acidity, electrical conductivity (EC), and pH measurements of fruit extracts indicated plant response differences between lighting treatments. In sensory panels, tasters ranked tomatoes for color, acidity, and sweetness using an objective scale, whereas color, aroma, texture, sweetness, acidity, aftertaste, and overall approval were ranked using hedonic scales. By collecting both physicochemical as well as sensory data, this study was able to determine whether statistically significant physicochemical parameters of tomato fruit also reflected consumer perception of fruit quality. Sensory panels indicated that statistically significant physicochemical differences were not noticeable to tasters and that tasters engaged in blind testing could not discern between tomatoes from different supplemental lighting treatments or unsupplemented controls. Growers interested in reducing supplemental lighting energy consumption by using intracanopy LED (IC-LED) supplemental lighting need not be concerned that the quality of their tomato fruits will be negatively affected by narrow-band supplemental radiation at the intensities and wavelengths used in this study.
Address Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Society for Horticultural Science Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0018-5345 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1301
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Author (up) Ebisawa, M.; Shoji, K.; Kato, M.; Shimomura, K.; Goto, F.; Yoshihara, T.
Title Supplementary Ultraviolet Radiation B Together with Blue Light at Night Increased Quercetin Content and Flavonol Synthase Gene Expression in Leaf Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Environment Control in Biology Abbreviated Journal Environ. Control Biol.
Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 1-11
Keywords Plants
Abstract Establishment of an effective supplementary lighting procedure is necessary to increase the value of leaf lettuce grown using a hydroponic method involving a low production cost. In leaf lettuce extracts, quercetin, one of the flavonoids, was isolated and identified. It was investigated that quercetin has important functions that can be used as a dietary supplement. Flavonol synthase (FLS) is a key enzyme involved in quercetin biosynthesis, catalyzes the conversion of dihydroquercetin to quercetin. Therefore, we determined the sequence of the flavonol synthase gene (FLS) in red leaf lettuce. We harvested leaf lettuce grown using supplementary light sources, such as ultraviolet radiation B (UV-B), ultraviolet radiation A, blue, and red lamps during the night. It is noteworthy that FLS expression and the quercetin content were particularly increased to a greater extent in young leaves than in mature leaves when UV-B and blue light were used simultaneously at night. We suggest that UV-B with blue light is used simultaneously at night for producing leaf lettuce with high quercetin content.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1880-554X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2799
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Author (up) Ehlert, K.; Piepenbring, M.; Kollar, A.
Title Ascospore release in apple scab underlies infrared sensation Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Fungal Biology Abbreviated Journal Fungal Biol
Volume 121 Issue 12 Pages 1054-1062
Keywords Plants
Abstract The agent of apple scab disease (Venturia inaequalis) is the most common pathogen in apple cultivation. Its ascospores are released in spring, mainly during daylight hours and triggered by rain events. To investigate the causes of diurnal rhythm of ascospore dissemination of the apple scab fungus ascospore releases were examined continuously with spore traps in the orchard and with laboratory assays. One of the spore traps was illuminated at night with different light sources in each year during 2011-2015. The laboratory assays were performed with different light sources with varying wavelengths and intensities. In field and laboratory conditions only light including infrared radiation stimulated ascospore release, but not with light in the visible spectrum only. Artificial illumination during night was correlated with an increase of up to 46 % of ascospores released overnight in the field. We proved that infrared radiation induces V. inaequalis to release its spores. This is the first report in which spore discharge could be stimulated during night under field conditions.
Address Julius Kuehn-Institut, Federal Research Center for Cultivated Plants, Institute for Plant Protection in Fruit Crops and Viticulture, Schwabenheimer Strasse 101, 69221 Dossenheim, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1878-6146 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29122177 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2454
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Author (up) Eng, R.Y.N.; Tsujita, M.J.; Grodzinski, B.
Title The effects of supplementary HPS lighting and carbon dioxide enrichment on the vegetative growth, nutritional status and flowering characteristics ofChrysanthemum morifoliumRamat Type Journal Article
Year 1985 Publication Journal of Horticultural Science Abbreviated Journal Journal of Horticultural Science
Volume 60 Issue 3 Pages 389-395
Keywords Plants
Abstract Supplementary high pressure sodium (HPS) lighting (140 µmol m−2s−1) and CO2 enrichment (1375 µl l−1) improved the vegetative growth of Chrysanthemum morifolium cv Dramatic by increases in stem length, stem diameter, root weight ratio, dry weight, relative growth and net assimilation rates. Three-week-old chrysanthemums grown under CO2 enrichment and HPS lighting had lower leaf weight and stem weight ratios as well as lower foliar nutrient content than those grown under ambient CO2 and natural light. Plants grown on to maturity under CO2 enrichment and supplementary HPS lighting had the longest stem lengths, the most flowers and greatest increase in dry weight. The combination of both additional light and CO2 was superior to either factor used alone. With 24 h HPS supplementary lighting CO2 enrichment was most effective in improving vegetative growth and flower quality when applied during the daytime. Night CO2 enrichment was not commercially beneficial at the light levels employed in this study.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0022-1589 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2373
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Author (up) ffrench-Constant, R.; Somers-Yeates, R.; Bennie, J.; Economou, T.; Hodgson, D.; Spalding, A.; McGregor, P.
Title Light pollution is associated with earlier tree budburst across the United Kingdom Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Roy Soc B Biol Sci
Volume 283 Issue 1833 Pages 1-9
Keywords Plants; light pollution, phenology, species interactions, tree budburst, temperature, urban heat islands; United Kingdom
Abstract The ecological impact of night-time lighting is of concern because of its well-demonstrated effects on animal behaviour. However, the potential of light pollution to change plant phenology and its corresponding knock-on effects on associated herbivores are less clear. Here, we test if artificial lighting can advance the timing of budburst in trees. We took a UK-wide 13 year dataset of spatially referenced budburst data from four deciduous tree species and matched it with both satellite imagery of night-time lighting and average spring temperature. We find that budburst occurs up to 7.5 days earlier in brighter areas, with the relationship being more pronounced for later-budding species. Excluding large urban areas from the analysis showed an even more pronounced advance of budburst, confirming that the urban ‘heat-island’ effect is not the sole cause of earlier urban budburst. Similarly, the advance in budburst across all sites is too large to be explained by increases in temperature alone. This dramatic advance of budburst illustrates the need for further experimental investigation into the impact of artificial night-time lighting on plant phenology and subsequent species interactions. As light pollution is a growing global phenomenon, the findings of this study are likely to be applicable to a wide range of species interactions across the world.
Address Centre for Ecology and Conservation, and 2 Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9EZ, UK; rf222(at)exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1472
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