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Author (up) Liu, J.D.; Goodspeed, D.; Sheng, Z.; Li, B.; Yang, Y.; Kliebenstein, D.J.; Braam, J.
Title Keeping the rhythm: light/dark cycles during postharvest storage preserve the tissue integrity and nutritional content of leafy plants Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol
Volume 15 Issue Pages 92
Keywords Plants
Abstract BACKGROUND: The modular body structure of plants enables detached plant organs, such as postharvest fruits and vegetables, to maintain active responsiveness to environmental stimuli, including daily cycles of light and darkness. Twenty-four hour light/darkness cycles entrain plant circadian clock rhythms, which provide advantage to plants. Here, we tested whether green leafy vegetables gain longevity advantage by being stored under light/dark cycles designed to maintain biological rhythms. RESULTS: Light/dark cycles during postharvest storage improved several aspects of plant tissue performance comparable to that provided by refrigeration. Tissue integrity, green coloration, and chlorophyll content were generally enhanced by cycling of light and darkness compared to constant light or darkness during storage. In addition, the levels of the phytonutrient glucosinolates in kale and cabbage remained at higher levels over time when the leaf tissue was stored under light/dark cycles. CONCLUSIONS: Maintenance of the daily cycling of light and dark periods during postharvest storage may slow the decline of plant tissues, such as green leafy vegetables, improving not only appearance but also the health value of the crops through the maintenance of chlorophyll and phytochemical content after harvest.
Address Department of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, TX, 77005, USA. braam@rice.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25879637; PMCID:PMC4396971 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1458
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Author (up) Liu, Z.; Lv, Y.; Ding, R.; Chen, X.; Pu, G.
Title Light Pollution Changes the Toxicological Effects of Cadmium on Microbial Community Structure and Function Associated with Leaf Litter Decomposition Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci
Volume 21 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Plants; Illumina Sequencing; artificial light at night; cadmium pollution; extracellular enzyme activities; litter decomposition; microbial biodiversity
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN/A) can not only alter the behavior and communication of biological organisms, it can also interact with other stressors. Despite its widespread use and the numerous potential ecological effects, little is known about the impact of ALAN on plant litter decomposition under cadmium (Cd) pollution in aquatic ecosystems. In an indoor microcosm experiment, we tested single and combined effects of ALAN and Cd on the activities and community structure of fungi associated with plant litter. The results showed that ALAN and/or Cd can change both water and leaf litter characteristics. ALAN exposure not only altered fungal community structure and their correlations, but also increased the activities of alkaline phosphatase, beta-glucosidase, and cellobiohydrolase. The leaf litter decomposition rate was 71% higher in the A-Cd treatment than that in the N-Cd treatment, indicating that the presence of ALAN weakened the negative impact of Cd on leaf litter decomposition. These results suggested that ALAN exposure mitigated the negative effect of Cd on leaf litter decomposition, contributing to the duel effect of ALAN on leaf litter decomposition. Overall, the results expand our understanding of ALAN on the environment and highlight the contribution of ALAN to Cd toxicity in aquatic ecosystems.
Address Guangxi Key Laboratory of Plant Conservation and Restoration Ecology in Karst Terrain, Guangxi Institute of Botany, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guilin 541006, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31936535 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2818
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Author (up) Lumsden, P. J., & Furuya, M.
Title Evidence for Two Actions of Light in the Photoperiodic Induction of Flowering in <italic>Pharbitis nil</italic> Type Journal Article
Year 1986 Publication Plant and Cell Physiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Using one-day-old light-grown seedlings of Pharbitis nil we have shown that there are two distinct responses to light during the inductive dark period. The first is the classic night-break, which inhibits flowering at a specific stage of the circadian rhythm (assumed to be the basis of dark time measurement). The second action is to control the phase of this rhythm. The two responses were compared at the 6th and 8th hour of darkness. They differed in their dose responses, and by using very short exposures it was possible to achieve one response without the other. The response of the rhythm to light displayed characteristics of other circadian rhythms; the direction and sensitivity of the phase shift changed between the 6th and 8th h, the rhythm was reset by longer exposures to light, and with one critical light treatment at the appropriate phase, the rhythm was apparently abolished. These results offer direct support for an external coincidence model in the photoperiodic control of floral induction.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-9053 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2375
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Author (up) Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review: Moth pollination and light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Ecological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Ecol Entomol
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 187–198
Keywords Ecology; Agro-ecosystems; artificial night lighting; ecological networks; ecosystem services; flowering plants; food-webs; moths; population declines; plants; insects; pollination
Abstract 1. Moths (Lepidoptera) are the major nocturnal pollinators of flowers. However, their importance and contribution to the provision of pollination ecosystem services may have been under-appreciated. Evidence was identified that moths are important pollinators of a diverse range of plant species in diverse ecosystems across the world.

2. Moth populations are known to be undergoing significant declines in several European countries. Among the potential drivers of this decline is increasing light pollution. The known and possible effects of artificial night lighting upon moths were reviewed, and suggest how artificial night lighting might in turn affect the provision of pollination by moths. The need for studies of the effects of artificial night lighting upon whole communities of moths was highlighted.

3. An ecological network approach is one valuable method to consider the effects of artificial night lighting upon the provision of pollination by moths, as it provides useful insights into ecosystem functioning and stability, and may help elucidate the indirect effects of artificial light upon communities of moths and the plants they pollinate.

4. It was concluded that nocturnal pollination is an ecosystem process that may potentially be disrupted by increasing light pollution, although the nature of this disruption remains to be tested.
Address School of Biological, Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, U.K.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6946 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1084
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Author (up) Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Effects of street lighting technologies on the success and quality of pollination in a nocturnally pollinated plant Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages e02550
Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly important driver of global change. Lighting directly affects plants, but few studies have investigated indirect effects mediated by interacting organisms. Nocturnal Lepidoptera are globally important pollinators, and pollen transport by moths is disrupted by lighting. Many street lighting systems are being replaced with novel, energy‐efficient lighting, with unknown ecological consequences. Using the wildflower Silene latifolia, we compared pollination success and quality at experimentally lit and unlit plots, testing two major changes to street lighting technology: in lamp type, from high‐pressure sodium lamps to light‐emitting diodes, and in lighting regime, from full‐night (FN) to part‐night (PN) lighting. We predicted that lighting would reduce pollination. S. latifolia was pollinated both diurnally and nocturnally. Contrary to our predictions, flowers under FN lighting had higher pollination success than flowers under either PN lighting or unlit controls, which did not significantly differ from each other. Lamp type, lighting regime, and distance from the light all significantly affected aspects of pollination quality. These results confirm that street lighting could affect plant reproduction through indirect effects mediated by nocturnal insects, and further highlight the possibility for novel lighting technologies to mitigate the effects of ALAN on ecosystems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2174
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