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Author (up) Schroer, S.; Hölker, F. url  doi
isbn  openurl
  Title Impact of Lighting on Flora and Fauna Type Book Chapter
  Year 2016 Publication Handbook of Advanced Lighting Technology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-33  
  Keywords Ecology; Lighting; Artificial light at night; ALAN; Plants; Animals; review  
  Abstract Technology, especially artificial light at night (ALAN), often has unexpected impacts on the environment. This chapter addresses both the perception of light by various organisms and the impact of ALAN on flora and fauna. The responses to ALAN are subdivided into the effects of light intensity, color spectra, and duration and timing of illumination. The ways organisms perceive light can be as variable as the habitats they live in. ALAN often interferes with natural light information. It is rarely neutral and has significant impacts beyond human perception. For example, UV light reflection of generative plant parts or the direction of light is used by many organisms as information for foraging, finding spawning sites, or communication. Contemporary outdoor lighting often lacks sustainable planning, even though the protection of species, habitat, and human well-being could be improved by adopting simple technical measures. The increasing use of ALAN with high intensities in the blue part of the spectrum, e.g., fluorescent light and LEDs, is discussed as a critical trend. Blue light is a major circadian signal in higher vertebrates and can substantially impact the orientation of organisms such as numerous insect species. A better understanding of how various types and sources of artificial light, and how organisms perceive ALAN, will be an important step towards more sustainable lighting. Such knowledge is the basis for sustainable lighting planning and the development of solutions to protect biodiversity from the effects of outdoor lighting. Maps that describe the rapid changes in ALAN are urgently needed. In addition, measures are required to reduce the increasing use and intensity of ALAN in more remote areas as signaling thresholds in flora and fauna at night are often close to moonlight intensity and far below streetlight levels.  
  Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany; schroer(at)igb-berlin.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-3-319-00295-8 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1470  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Shillo, R., & Halevy, A. H. url  openurl
  Title Interaction of photoperiod and temperature in flowering-control of Gypsophila paniculata L Type Journal Article
  Year 1982 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 385-393  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Long day promotes flowering of Gysophila paniculata L cultivar ‘Bristol Fairy’. Repeated treatments with GA3 or GA4 + 7 in short days did not promote flowering. The long photoperiod is effective only at relatively high temperatures. At night temperatures below 12°C, the plants remain vegetative even in long days. Efficient artificial lighting is from incandescent lamps at 60–100 lux. Fluorescent lighting (Cool-White) is not effective. Lighting of 4 hours as a night-break or at the end of the night were equally effective, but 4 hours lighting as a day-extension was less effective. Whole-night lighting promoted flowering more than any of the 4-hour lighting regimes. Cyclic lighting of one third light in each cycle promoted flowering to the same extent as continuous lighting. Light intensity during the day has a decisive effect on flower production.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2370  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Shor, E.; Potavskaya, R.; Kurtz, A.; Paik, I.; Huq, E.; Green, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title PIF-mediated sucrose regulation of the circadian oscillator is light quality and temperature dependent Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Genes Abbreviated Journal Genes (Basel)  
  Volume 9 Issue 12 Pages  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Studies are increasingly showing that metabolic and circadian (~24 h) pathways are strongly interconnected, with the circadian system regulating the metabolic state of the cell, and metabolic products feeding back to entrain the oscillator. In plants, probably the most significant impact of the circadian system on metabolism is in its reciprocal regulation of photosynthesis; however, the pathways by which this occurs are still poorly understood. We have previously shown that members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) family are involved in the photosynthate entrainment of the circadian oscillator. In this paper, using Arabidopsis mutants and overexpression lines, we examine how temperature and light quality affect PIF-mediated sucrose signaling to the oscillator and examine the contributions of individual PIF members. Our results also show that the quality of light is important for PIF signaling, with red and blue lights having the opposite effects, and that temperature affects PIF-mediated sucrose signaling. We propose the light sensitivity of PIF-mediated sucrose entrainment of the oscillator may be important in enabling plants to distinguish between sucrose produced de novo from photosynthesis during the day and the sucrose products of starch degradation at the end of the night.  
  Address Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Institute for Life Sciences, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel. rgreen@mail.huji.ac.il  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2073-4425 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30551669; PMCID:PMC6316277 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2155  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Siemens, C.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title III. On the influence of electric light upon vegetation, and on certain physical principles involved Type Journal Article
  Year 1880 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Abbreviated Journal Abstr. Pap. Printed Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond.  
  Volume 30 Issue 200-205 Pages 210-219  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0370-1662 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2376  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Singhal, R. K., Kumar, M., & Bose, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ecophysiological Responses of Artificial Night Light Pollution in Plants Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Early in the 20th century, disparate human developmental processes culminate excess artificial light during night time and distort the phenological, physiological and ecological responses, which are sustained in the plants, animals and microorganism from millions of years. Earlier studies regarding artificial light (AL) during the night predominantly covered the drastic effects on animal systems. Although, drastic effects of AL during night time are enormous; therefore, the present topic is focused on the physiological and ecological consequences of artificial night light pollution (ANLP) on plant systems. In these consequences, most of the plant processes under ANLP are affected intensely and cause compelling changes in plant life cycle from germination to maturity. However, severe effects were observed in the case of pollination, photoreceptor signalling, flowering and microhabitats of plants. Along with drastic effects on ecology and environments, its relevance to human developmental processes cannot be avoided. Therefore, we need to equipoise between sustainable environment and steadily human development processes. Further, selection of plant/crop species, which are more responsive to ANLP, can minimize the ecological consequences of night light pollution. Likewise, changing artificial nightscape with the implication of new LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) lightening policies like UJALA (www.ujala.gov.in), which are low cost, more durable, eco-friendly and less emitter of CO2, have potential to overcome the biodiversity threats, which arise due to old artificial lightening technology from decades. Hence, adopting new advance artificial lightening technology and understanding its impact on plant ecosystem will be a future challenge for plant biologist.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2352  
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