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Author Haag, C.R.; Riek, M.; Hottinger, J.W.; Pajunen, V.I.; Ebert, D.
Title Genetic diversity and genetic differentiation in Daphnia metapopulations with subpopulations of known age Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Genetics Abbreviated Journal Genetics
Volume 170 Issue 4 Pages 1809-1820
Keywords Plants; Aging; Animals; Daphnia/*genetics/*physiology; *Genetic Variation; *Genetics, Population
Abstract If colonization of empty habitat patches causes genetic bottlenecks, freshly founded, young populations should be genetically less diverse than older ones that may have experienced successive rounds of immigration. This can be studied in metapopulations with subpopulations of known age. We studied allozyme variation in metapopulations of two species of water fleas (Daphnia) in the skerry archipelago of southern Finland. These populations have been monitored since 1982. Screening 49 populations of D. longispina and 77 populations of D. magna, separated by distances of 1.5-2180 m, we found that local genetic diversity increased with population age whereas pairwise differentiation among pools decreased with population age. These patterns persisted even after controlling for several potentially confounding ecological variables, indicating that extinction and recolonization dynamics decrease local genetic diversity and increase genetic differentiation in these metapopulations by causing genetic bottlenecks during colonization. We suggest that the effect of these bottlenecks may be twofold, namely decreasing genetic diversity by random sampling and leading to population-wide inbreeding. Subsequent immigration then may not only introduce new genetic material, but also lead to the production of noninbred hybrids, selection for which may cause immigrant alleles to increase in frequency, thus leading to increased genetic diversity in older populations.
Address Unite d'Ecologie et d'Evolution, Departement de Biologie, Universite de Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. christoph.haag@ed.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0016-6731 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:15937138; PMCID:PMC1449778 Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 660
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Author Kirschey, T.; Meisel, J.
Title Augen in der Landschaft Seen und Stillgewässer Nordostdeutschlands. Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Naturmagazin Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 4-11
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 661
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Author Woolsey, S.; Capelli, F.; Gonser, T.; Hoehn, E.; Hostmann, M.; Junker, B.; Paetzold, A.; Roulier, C.; Schweizer, S.; Tiegs, S.D.; Tockner, K.; Weber, C.; Peter, A.
Title A strategy to assess river restoration success Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal Freshwater Biol
Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 752-769
Keywords Plants; evaluation guidelines; socio-economics; indicators; floodplain; decision making; bioassessment; sustainability; biodiversity
Abstract 1. Elaborate restoration attempts are underway worldwide to return human-impacted rivers to more natural conditions. Assessing the outcome of river restoration projects is vital for adaptive management, evaluating project efficiency, optimising future programmes and gaining public acceptance. An important reason why assessment is often omitted is lack of appropriate guidelines.

2. Here we present guidelines for assessing river restoration success. They are based on a total of 49 indicators and 13 specific objectives elaborated for the restoration of low- to mid-order rivers in Switzerland. Most of these objectives relate to ecological attributes of rivers, but socio-economic aspects are also considered.

3. A strategy is proposed according to which a set of indicators is selected from the total of 49 indicators to ensure that indicators match restoration objectives and measures, and that the required effort for survey and analysis of indicators is appropriate to the project budget.

4. Indicator values are determined according to methods described in detailed method sheets. Restoration success is evaluated by comparing indicator values before and after restoration measures have been undertaken. To this end, values are first standardised on a dimensionless scale ranging from 0 to 1, then averaged across different indicators for a given project objective, and finally assigned to one of five overall success categories.

5. To illustrate the application of this scheme, a case study on the Thur River, Switzerland, is presented. Seven indicators were selected to meet a total of five project objectives. The project was successful in achieving ‘provision of high recreational value’, ‘lateral connectivity’ and ‘vertical connectivity’ but failed to meet the objectives ‘morphological and hydraulic variability’ and ‘near natural abundance and diversity of fauna’. Results from this assessment allowed us to identify potential deficits and gaps in the restoration project. To gain information on the sensitivity of the assessment scheme would require a set of complementary indicators for each restoration objective.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 662
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Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review: Moth pollination and light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Ecological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Ecol Entomol
Volume 40 Issue 3 Pages 187–198
Keywords Ecology; Agro-ecosystems; artificial night lighting; ecological networks; ecosystem services; flowering plants; food-webs; moths; population declines; plants; insects; pollination
Abstract 1. Moths (Lepidoptera) are the major nocturnal pollinators of flowers. However, their importance and contribution to the provision of pollination ecosystem services may have been under-appreciated. Evidence was identified that moths are important pollinators of a diverse range of plant species in diverse ecosystems across the world.

2. Moth populations are known to be undergoing significant declines in several European countries. Among the potential drivers of this decline is increasing light pollution. The known and possible effects of artificial night lighting upon moths were reviewed, and suggest how artificial night lighting might in turn affect the provision of pollination by moths. The need for studies of the effects of artificial night lighting upon whole communities of moths was highlighted.

3. An ecological network approach is one valuable method to consider the effects of artificial night lighting upon the provision of pollination by moths, as it provides useful insights into ecosystem functioning and stability, and may help elucidate the indirect effects of artificial light upon communities of moths and the plants they pollinate.

4. It was concluded that nocturnal pollination is an ecosystem process that may potentially be disrupted by increasing light pollution, although the nature of this disruption remains to be tested.
Address School of Biological, Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, U.K.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6946 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1084
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Author Raven, J.A.; Cockell, C.S.
Title Influence on photosynthesis of starlight, moonlight, planetlight, and light pollution (reflections on photosynthetically active radiation in the universe) Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Astrobiology Abbreviated Journal Astrobiology
Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 668-675
Keywords Plants
Abstract Photosynthesis on Earth can occur in a diversity of organisms in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) range of 10 nmol of photons m(-2) s(-1) to 8 mmol of photons m(-2) s(-1). Similar considerations would probably apply to photosynthetic organisms on Earth-like planets (ELPs) in the continuously habitable zone of other stars. On Earth, starlight PAR is inadequate for photosynthetically supported growth. An increase in starlight even to reach the minimum theoretical levels to allow for photosynthesis would require a universe that was approximately ten million times older, or with a ten million times greater density of stars, than is the case for the present universe. Photosynthesis on an ELP using PAR reflected from a natural satellite with the same size as our Moon, but at the Roche limit, could support a low rate of photosynthesis at full Moon. Photosynthesis on an ELP-like satellite of a Jupiter-sized planet using light reflected from the planet could be almost 1% of the rate in full sunlight on Earth when the planet was full. These potential contributions to photosynthesis require that the contribution is compared with the rate of photosynthesis driven by direct radiation from the star. Light pollution on Earth only energizes photosynthesis by organisms that are very close to the light source. However, effects of light pollution on photosynthesis can be more widespread if the photosynthetic canopy is retained for more of the year, caused by effects on photoperiodism, with implications for the influence of civilizations on photosynthesis.
Address Plant Research Unit, University of Dundee at SCRI, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1557-8070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:16916290 Approved no
Call Number (down) LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1198
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