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Author Maksimainen, M.; Vaaja, M.T.; Kurkela, M.; Virtanen, J.-P.; Julin, A.; Jaalama, K.; Hyyppä, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime Mobile Laser Scanning and 3D Luminance Measurement: Verifying the Outcome of Roadside Tree Pruning with Mobile Measurement of the Road Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi  
  Volume 9 Issue 7 Pages 455  
  Keywords Lighting; Plants; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Roadside vegetation can affect the performance of installed road lighting. We demonstrate a workflow in which a car-mounted measurement system is used to assess the light-obstructing effect of roadside vegetation. The mobile mapping system (MMS) includes a panoramic camera system, laser scanner, inertial measurement unit, and satellite positioning system. The workflow and the measurement system were applied to a road section of Munkkiniemenranta, Helsinki, Finland, in 2015 and 2019. The relative luminance distribution on a road surface and the obstructing vegetation were measured before and after roadside vegetation pruning applying a luminance-calibrated mobile mapping system. The difference between the two measurements is presented, and the opportunities provided by the mobile 3D luminance measurement system are discussed.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3092  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jawaad Atif, M.; Amin, B.; Imran Ghani, M.; Ali, M.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Cheng, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Allium sativum L. (Garlic) bulb enlargement as influenced by differential combinations of photoperiod and temperature Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Food Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Food Chemistry  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 127991  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Photoperiod and temperature are vital environmental factors that regulate plant developmental processes. However, the roles of these factors in garlic bulb enlargement are unclear. In this report, responses of garlic bulb morphology and physiology to combinations of photoperiod (light/dark: 10/14 h, 12/12 h, 14/10 h) and temperature (light/dark: 25/18°C, 30/20°C) were investigated. For garlic cultivar G103, bulb characteristics, phytohormones (IAA, ABA, ZT, tZR, JA), allicin and phenolic acids (p-coumaric and p-hydroxybenzoic) were highest under a photoperiod of 14 h at 30°C. Maximum GA was observed under 14 h+30°C for cv. G2011-5. Maximum caffeic, ferulic and vanillic acids were detected for cv. G2011-5 at 14 h+30°C, 12 h+25°C and 14 h+25°C, respectively. Flavonoids (myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol and apigenin) were not detected in this trial. This is the first report describing the impact of long periods of light duration and higher temperatures on garlic morphology, phytohormones, phenolic acids and allicin content.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0308-8146 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3137  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boom, M.P.; Spoelstra, K.; Biere, A.; Knop, E.; Visser, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pollination and fruit infestation under artificial light at night:light colour matters Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 18389  
  Keywords Plants; Ecology  
  Abstract Rapid human population growth and associated urbanization lead to increased artificial illumination of the environment. By changing the natural light-dark cycle, artificial lighting can affect the functioning of natural ecosystems. Many plants rely on insects in order to reproduce but these insects are known to be disturbed by artificial light. Therefore, plant-insect interactions may be affected when exposed to artificial illumination. These effects can potentially be reduced by using different light spectra than white light. We studied the effect of artificial lighting on plant-insect interactions in the Silene latifolia-Hadena bicruris system using a field set-up with four different light treatments: red, green, white and a dark control. We compared the proportion of fertilized flowers and fertilized ovules as well as the infestation of fruits by Hadena bicruris, a pollinating seed predator. We found no difference in the proportion of fertilized flowers among the treatments. The proportion of fruits infested by H. bicruris was however significantly higher under green and white light and a significantly lower proportion of fertilized ovules was found under green light. We show that artificial light with different colours impacts plant-insect interactions differently, with direct consequences for plant fitness.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), P.O. Box 50, 6700 AB, Wageningen, The Netherlands. m.visser@nioo.knaw.nl  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33110135; PMCID:PMC7591485 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3189  
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Author Falcon, J.; Torriglia, A.; Attia, D.; Vienot, F.; Gronfier, C.; Behar-Cohen, F.; Martinsons, C.; Hicks, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to Artificial Light at Night and the Consequences for Flora, Fauna, and Ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front Neurosci  
  Volume 14 Issue Pages 602796  
  Keywords Review; Animals; Plants; Ecology; anthropogenic impact; artificial-light-at-night; biological clocks; ecosystems; light-emitting-diodes; photoreception  
  Abstract The present review draws together wide-ranging studies performed over the last decades that catalogue the effects of artificial-light-at-night (ALAN) upon living species and their environment. We provide an overview of the tremendous variety of light-detection strategies which have evolved in living organisms – unicellular, plants and animals, covering chloroplasts (plants), and the plethora of ocular and extra-ocular organs (animals). We describe the visual pigments which permit photo-detection, paying attention to their spectral characteristics, which extend from the ultraviolet into infrared. We discuss how organisms use light information in a way crucial for their development, growth and survival: phototropism, phototaxis, photoperiodism, and synchronization of circadian clocks. These aspects are treated in depth, as their perturbation underlies much of the disruptive effects of ALAN. The review goes into detail on circadian networks in living organisms, since these fundamental features are of critical importance in regulating the interface between environment and body. Especially, hormonal synthesis and secretion are often under circadian and circannual control, hence perturbation of the clock will lead to hormonal imbalance. The review addresses how the ubiquitous introduction of light-emitting diode technology may exacerbate, or in some cases reduce, the generalized ever-increasing light pollution. Numerous examples are given of how widespread exposure to ALAN is perturbing many aspects of plant and animal behaviour and survival: foraging, orientation, migration, seasonal reproduction, colonization and more. We examine the potential problems at the level of individual species and populations and extend the debate to the consequences for ecosystems. We stress, through a few examples, the synergistic harmful effects resulting from the impacts of ALAN combined with other anthropogenic pressures, which often impact the neuroendocrine loops in vertebrates. The article concludes by debating how these anthropogenic changes could be mitigated by more reasonable use of available technology – for example by restricting illumination to more essential areas and hours, directing lighting to avoid wasteful radiation and selecting spectral emissions, to reduce impact on circadian clocks. We end by discussing how society should take into account the potentially major consequences that ALAN has on the natural world and the repercussions for ongoing human health and welfare.  
  Address Inserm, CNRS, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Integratives, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-453X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33304237; PMCID:PMC7701298 Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3245  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zheng, Q.; Teo, H.C.; Koh, L.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night Advances Spring Phenology in the United States Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 399  
  Keywords Plants; Remote sensing  
  Abstract Plant phenology is closely related to light availability as diurnal and seasonal cycles are essential environmental cues for organizing bio-ecological processes. The natural cycles of light, however, have been dramatically disrupted by artificial light at night (ALAN) due to recent urbanization. The influence on plant phenology of ALAN and its spatial variation remain largely unknown. By analyzing satellite data on ALAN intensity across the United States, here, we showed that ALAN tended to advance the start date of the growing season (SOS), although the overall response of SOS to ALAN was relatively weak compared with other potential factors (e.g., preseason temperature). The phenological impact of ALAN showed a spatially divergent pattern, whereby ALAN mainly advanced SOS at climatically moderate regions within the United States (e.g., Virginia), while its effect was insignificant or even reversed at very cold (e.g., Minnesota) and hot regions (e.g., Florida). Such a divergent pattern was mainly attributable to its high sensitivity to chilling insufficiency, where the advancing effect on SOS was only triggered on the premise that chilling days exceeded a certain threshold. Other mechanisms may also play a part, such as the interplay among chilling, forcing and photoperiod and the difference in species life strategies. Besides, urban areas and natural ecosystems were found to suffer from similar magnitudes of influence from ALAN, albeit with a much higher baseline ALAN intensity in urban areas. Our findings shed new light on the phenological impact of ALAN and its relation to space and other environmental cues, which is beneficial to a better understanding and projection of phenology changes under a warming and urbanizing future.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number (up) GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3332  
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